https://twitter.com/kanyewest/status/987052001023279104″ />


West’s behavior during the tour had been erratic and included several pro-Donald Trump onstage comments as well as his abrupt departure from the stage during New York’s Panorama Festival when he learned that his wife, Kim Kardashian, had been robbed in Paris. The MC has kept a relatively low profile since cancelling the last 21 dates of the 2016 tour in support of his "Life of Pablo" album after he was hospitalized in Los Angeles for psychiatric evaluation.
According to his tweets, one will be a solo album containing seven songs on June 1, to be followed by an album with Kid Cudi on June 8. West's rep did not immediately respond to Variety's request for more information. West added that his new group with Cudi is called Kids See Ghost.
He’s always very focused, and our relationship with him is that we always have great respect for him and when he’s ready to do something or talk about something, we’re there for him, we totally support his vision and his focus, and that’s where we leave it. "Kanye is working, that’s been widely reported. I check in with him from time to time just to see how he’s doing. "When we talk, we don’t really get down to the granular of where he’s going and how he’s flying there, we keep it much more on a broader level," Bartels said. What’s great about our relationship is that I always know when it’s go time — because he wakes me up." Bartels has since been replaced as CEO by Eminem manager Paul Rosenberg. In June of last year, Steve Bartels, then-CEO of West's label Def Jam, told Variety that the MC doesn't necessarily keep the label apprised of what he's doing.
Various reports said he has spent several months recording near Jackson Hole, Wyo. — much of the material on his recent albums has been recorded at relatively remote locations — and while he has been photographed or reported to be in the studio with Migos, Big Sean, Lil Yachty, Vic Mensa, Mike Dean, Pete Rock, Yasiin Bey (Mos Def), Pusha T, The-Dream, Travis Scott, Dave Chappelle, and others, it's unclear who will be on the album. Not much is known about the new album, which he said in March 2016 would be called "Turbo Grafx 16" after "one of my favorite gaming systems when I was a kid," but it seems unlikely that is still the title, if it ever was.
In the middle of a long series of Tweets that will make up a philosophy "book" that Kanye West announced that he's writing on Twitter, the MC casually mentioned on Thursday that he's dropping not one, but two new albums next month.

That required most cinemas to be owned by third-party operators, requiring studios to have something of an arm's length relationship with their clients. It wasn't always this way. Decades ago, studios owned the theaters that showed their films. Paramount Pictures, Inc., a landmark 1948 Supreme Court decision that ruled that this kind of distribution system was an anti-trust violation. That changed with United States v.
Some studios, worried about domestic attendance declines, believe that they need to more closely align themselves to the theatrical experience. And there have also been mutterings that Amazon Studios could be interested in buying a theater somewhere. Byron Allen's Entertainment Studios has also said it is kicking the tires on Landmark, as a way to give the newer distributor a higher profile in Hollywood. Neon, for instance, was co-founded by Alamo Drafthouse head Tim League and the studio has used the theater-chain to engage in innovative promotions for its films, handing out merchandise and outfitting staffers with pins tied to its upcoming movies.
If Netflix owned a theater, the company would be able to sidestep this barrier. Although the streaming giant has had day-and-date releases for a handful of titles, such as "Okja" and Angelina Jolie's "First They Killed My Father," none of the major chains will carry a move if it's simultaneously available on home platforms. Netflix received four Oscar nominations this year for Dee Rees' Southern epic "Mudbound," but it has yet to crack the best-picture race with one of its movies.
But there are other perks that could appeal to unconventional owners. The names of both companies floated in the press illustrates the seismic changes happening in the movie industry. At a time when ticket sales are on the decline, owning a theater doesn't have the same profitability margins it once had.
Netflix already enjoys that kind of relationship with its users, having affixed itself in customer's minds as a one-stop shop for video consumption. Disney is starting its own streaming service, following in the footsteps of CBS, and more entertainment companies are planning to build out their own over-the-top offerings as a way of better establishing their brands.
The Landmark sale is a sign of changing business models. Studios are worried their films aren't getting enough TLC when they're screening in theaters and they may make start spending money to change things.” />
It's all part of a larger trend, where content creators are trying to forge a deeper bond with their consumers. Disney owns and operates the historic El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood, using it frequently to tout its releases and to host premieres.
Netflix, which has been flirting with getting into the theatrical exhibition space as a way to qualify its films for awards consideration and to serve as a kind of test-kitchen for corporate experimentation, looked at the chain.  (Netflix declined to comment.) However, it's not interested in the company, according to sources.
But this week, two would-be buyers emerged as potential suitors: Netflix and Byron Allen's Entertainment Studios. Landmark Theatres, a high-end chain known for its art-house offerings, has been quietly on the market for some time.

Longtime horror film director Alexandre Aja is getting ready to make his mark in virtual reality (VR) with “Campfire Creepers,” a new mini series of scary campfire stories. The series is premiering at the Tribeca film festival this week, and will also come to the Oculus Rift and Gear VR headsets this weekend.

Said Aja: “VR may be the tool we have been dreaming about for so long.”” /> As for Aja, the director professed that he had caught the VR bug while working on this project. “As a director, I’m always looking for immersion,” he said. That was true even for his traditional movies, he said, but VR had the potential of bringing immersion to a whole new level.
One of the first two episodes of “Campfire Creepers” stars Robert Englund, who is best known for playing Freddy Kruger, while the second episode plays with the dynamic between camp counselors and the children they are entrusted with — and the things that can go wrong when tensions between the two groups rise in the middle of the forest, on a full moon night.
The project also received funding from Oculus. However, Aja had to shift gears a bit when the company ran out of funding, with Dark Corner picking up the slack. “Our role is to continue to elevate the craft of VR,” said Oculus executive producer Yelena Rachitsky. The work on “Campfire Creepers” began in 2017 with Los Angeles-based cinematic VR startup Future Lighthouse, the studio that was also behind the animated VR film Melita.
“We could have made something that was really traumatizing,” he admitted. That’s in part because viewers who have a headset strapped to their face can’t cover their eyes, or hide their face behind a pillow once the full moon takes effect, summoning scary creatures. Instead, Aja decided to go for what he called “a comfortable type of awe” — a more campy approach that plays with the tropes of the genre without any explicit gore.
“All storytelling started around the campfire,” Aja told Variety this week. “It’s the perfect technology for awe,” Aja said. The director, who is best known for horror flicks like “The Hills Have Eyes,” “High Tension” and “Piranha 3D,” had never done any VR work before, but said that he quickly fell in love with the medium.

"Offering this type of game of chance to Dutch players without a license is prohibited," it said in a press release. "Moreover, the analyses that are currently available indicate that all of the loot boxes that were studied could be addictive." But, it added, there's no indication loot boxes are being opened on a large scale by problem players.
The Dutch Gaming Authority is now asking the video game industry to modify its products before the mid-June deadline.  ” /> It wants them to remove the addiction-sensitive elements ("almost winning" effects, visual effects, the ability to open multiple loot boxes quickly, etc.) and implement measures to protect minors and other vulnerable groups.
The Gaming Authority's study found some loot box prizes can also be traded outside of their games, giving them a market value. Their contents are usually random, which encourages players to spend more money as they pursue certain rewards. Loot boxes are digital treasure chests players can either earn in-game or buy with real-life cash, and they've become a common practice in the video game industry in recent years.
It's since overhauled the game's microtransaction and progression systems, but that hasn't stopped lawmakers in the U.S., the Netherlands, Australia, and elsewhere from pursuing regulations against what they consider "predatory practices" and "gambling for children." Fans were so incensed they blasted publisher Electronic Arts on Reddit, giving it the most downvoted comment in history. The Gaming Authority began investigating loot boxes in November after "Star Wars Battlefront II" caused widespread controversy over a microtransaction system many felt was unfair and exploitative. EA also reportedly lost an estimated $3.1 billion in stock value at the time.
It's now giving game publishers until June 20 to comply with the law or they could face "enforcement action." Four out of ten loot boxes found in video games recently studied by the Netherlands' Gaming Authority violated the country's Betting and Gaming Act, the organization revealed Thursday.

The apartment is represented by Tyler Ferguson’s longtime friend and fellow thespian Sarah Saltzberg, co-founder and principal of the Bohemia Realty Group.
French doors connect the living room to the master bedroom, which is ever so slightly larger than the living room and includes a good-sized fitted walk-in closet, a second smaller closet, a windowed office nook behind French doors and a spacious bathroom with marble-topped double-sink vanity and a roomy closet for linens and toiletries.
The just shy of 5,000-square-foot, 4-bedroom and 4.5-bathroom house, sequestered behind gates and obscured behind trees with a swimming pool and an ocean-view pavilion perched high on the hillside behind the house, was previously owned by Gwen Stefani who sold it in the spring of 2007 for $4.795 million to “That 70s Show” creator Mark Brazill who quickly sold it at a significant loss about 1.5 years later for $3.995 million to Lärabar energy bar founder Lara Merriken who, in turn, sold it to Tyler Ferguson and Mikita. In Los Angeles, Tyler Ferguson and Mikita own an elegant yet still fantastically quirky, 1920s Spanish Colonial Revival-style residence in the Los Feliz area they bought in the fall of 2013, shortly after they were married, for $4.55 million.
The entrance hall has a convenient coat closet and a privately positioned guest bathroom that features an arched doorway and penny-tile flooring while the living room sports a mid-century modern style sectional sofa, a booze-filled bar cart and a collection of child-like black-and-white drawings over the sofa and a mismatched collection of mirrors on the opposite wall. Open to the living room over a two-stool snack bar, the efficiently compact kitchen is smartly arranged and expensively finished with thick marble countertops and designer stainless steel appliances. The room has just one, large and east-facing sash window shoved up into a corner next to French doors that open to a charming, invitingly cozy and thick-cushioned reading nook lined in dark wallpaper with a pattern that suggests a whimsically curlicued handlebar mustache.
Located on a middle floor of a 20-story, Art Deco-inspired, full-service brown brick tower built in the early 1930s on a busy corner between Union Square and Stuyvesant Square, the fully renovated pre-war apartment retains many original architectural details including beamed ceilings, glass door knobs and original hardwood floors stained a deep shade of espresso.
The ginger-haired five-time Emmy nominee, who voiced the Shangri Llama character in the 2016 blockbuster animated film “Ice Age: Collision Course,” and his prominently eye-browed attorney/bedding designer husband Justin Mikita purchased the approximately 900-square-foot one-bedroom and two-bathroom co-operative unit in early 2015 for $1,232,500. The eclectically decorated apartment, which carries maintenance charges of $1,877 per month, is also available completely furnished for an additional, undisclosed amount. Perhaps with a real estate eye toward a trade up to bigger digs more commensurate with the financial firepower of someone who rakes in an estimated $500,000 per episode for his co-starring role on the long-running hit sitcom “Modern Family,” Los Angeles-based actor Jesse Tyler Ferguson is looking to sell his New York City pied-à-terre for $1.495 million.
exterior photo: Nicholas Strini for Property Shark” />

For the full-year 2017, net sales declined 11%, to $4.88 billion, and it posted a net loss of $1.05 billion (versus net income of $318 million in 2016). The El Segundo, Calif.-based company has suffered financial declines over the last several years. Mattel's well-known brands include Barbie, American Girl, Fisher-Price, and Hot Wheels.
31, 2017, Mattel had a total of 28,000 employees — down 12.5% from 32,000 a year earlier. As of Dec.
Struggling toy-maker Mattel has appointed Ynon Kreiz, former CEO of Disney's Maker Studios, as its new chief executive officer.
Sinclair, who last year announced plans to retire, will exit the exec chairman post with Kreiz's chairman appointment. "Ynon has tremendous expertise across areas critical to our strategy, including digital, media and entertainment, and we have already benefitted from that experience and his compelling vision for the company since he became a director," said Christopher Sinclair, executive chairman and former CEO, in a statement.
He holds a bachelor’s degree in economics and management from Tel Aviv University and an MBA from the Anderson Graduate School of Management.” /> Kreiz, 53, also serves on the board of Warner Music Group and is a member of the advisory board of UCLA's Anderson Graduate School of Management.
Earlier in his career, Kreiz co-founded and was chairman/CEO of Fox Kids Europe, which distributed pay-TV channels in 50-plus countries. From 2008-11, he served as chairman and CEO of Endemol Group, one of the world's largest independent TV production companies, and before that was a general partner at venture-capital firm Balderton Capital (formerly Benchmark Capital Europe) from 2005-07.
Kreiz is the former chairman and CEO of Maker Studios, acquired by Disney in 2014, and exited the YouTube-oriented digital content network in January 2016. Disney ended up paying $675 million for Maker — below the $950 million maximum potential price tag — and Maker is now part of the media conglomerate's new Direct-to-Consumer and International business segment headed by Kevin Mayer.
He takes over as Mattel's CEO effective April 26, 2018. Kreiz replaces Margo Georgiadis, named CEO in February 2017, who will "pursue a new opportunity in the technology sector." Georgiadis will serve in an advisory role at Mattel through May 10.
Kreiz joined Mattel's board of directors in June 2017. As previously announced, he also will become chairman of the board, effective upon his election at the annual shareholders meeting May 17.
"Mattel is an iconic company with many of the world’s most beloved brands and greatest toy franchises," Kreiz said in a statement. "I am excited by the opportunity to lead the company towards its next phase of transformation and restore Mattel to a high-performing toy company."

The evening afforded four scholarships to students who shared the ways in which their lives were positively transformed after being placed in independent schools by the alliance, as well as a performance by “American Idol” finalist David Hernandez.” />
“I know for sure that you won’t find two people with bigger hearts and that create more opportunities for others,” producer Charles King said in a touching introduction about his good friends and founders of The Story Company, director Tim Story and wife Vicky Mara Story.
The theater welcomed a variety of patrons of diversity and education, including Ava DuVernay,  20th Century Fox chairman and CEO Stacey Snider, and “Insecure”’ star Yvonne Orji, who served as the night’s emcee.
Established in SoCal in 1985, the org consists of 54 private, independent elementary and secondary schools aiming to increase diversity in their student body. Since its inception, the organization has assisted thousands of students from underrepresented communities with the application process for independent schools, as well as provide ongoing support for both students and their families.
“My mother had a whole book throughout the New England area for boarding and private schools, and she made sure me and my three brothers went to a boarding or private school,” she said. Raised by a Nigerian family in Maryland, Orji explained how important education was in her household.
The Storys accepted the 2018 Impact Award at the Independent School Alliance for Minority Affairs dinner at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica on Tuesday evening. Also honored with an Impact Award was director of admission at Harvard-Westlake School Elizabeth Gregory Riordan.
As native Angelenos with three children enrolled in independent schooling, Vicky Story explained there was “no other answer but yes” when attorney and alliance chair Nina Shaw approached the couple to support the cause. “What better way for us to give back to our community than to support such an amazing organization,” Vicky said.

Broken Lizard was formed at Colgate University as a comedy troupe, leading to the micro-budget 1996 comedy "Puddle Cruiser." The film attracted the attention of Harvey Weinstein at Miramax, where "Super Troopers" was originally developed.
"You're never completely sure that it's going to work until then," Pirello added. Pirello and Chandrasekhar agree that getting through the first fan screening on March 19 in Los Angeles was the major milestone.
The 2015 crowdfunding campaign  wound up raising $4.4 million — the second-most successful crowdfunding campaign ever for a movie. It was funded through  Indiegogo with over 50,000 contributors, approaching the $5.7 million record set by the “Veronica Mars” movie on Kickstarter in 2013. Fox Searchlight had agreed to release the sequel if the $2 million goal was met.
Incentives sold on the first day included a producer title for $10,000, a speaking actor role for $10,000, a trip to the ballpark with the main actors for $15,000 and even the patrol car that was used in the filming — $35,000. The 17-city tour was largely for fans who bought the incentive to attend a fan screening prior to the release.
"Harvey had really liked 'Puddle Cruiser' but the indie world was changing and the movie was perceived as a big risk on nobodies," recalled Richard Pirello, who produced both "Super Trooper" films.
"I've been on a 17-city tour for the fan screenings, and we've been going out to party and I've been performing stand-up between the screenings, so it's been a busy time," director Jay Chandrasekhar told Variety.
Seventeen years after the original "Super Troopers," the sequel is arriving in theaters with a massive assist from fans of the wacky police comedy.
"Canadians laughed louder at the insults to the United States." "What I've found is that humans do laugh at the same things everywhere," Chadrasekhar said.
The quintet play profane Vermont state troopers with a penchant for pranks and feuding with other local law enforcement officers. The film reunites all five Troopers from the original film — Chandrasekhar, Kevin Heffernan, Steve Lemme, Paul Soter and Erik Stolhanske — collectively known as Broken Lizard. “Super Troopers 2” begins opening Thursday night in North America in previews and expands to 2,040 locations Friday.
 ” />
Though its $23 million worldwide gross was not remarkable, it became a cult favorite, beloved by buzzed viewers in the same way "Animal House" was a generation before. The sequel's opening was therefore planned for 4/20. The first “Super Troopers” was made for $1.2 million — funded by a single investor — and acquired by Fox Searchlight at the 2001 Sundance Film Festival.
"At one point in Vancouver, we walked into a bar and there were 10 guys dressed like us in state trooper gear," he recalled. "There's a level of fan interest that's very gratifying."
"Once the first film was so successful, there was always this barrage of fan pressure to do the sequel," said Pirello. But then we got to the initial goal of $2 million in a little more than 24 hours." "So after years of that, we had a big debate about using crowdfunding and we were a little worried that we'd fall short.
We’d get pulled over by cops who would thank us and then would let us go." "But it did so well after that it in ancillary markets that it became impossible for us to get away from it. "'Super Troopers' did well but not crazy well theatrically," Chandrasekhar recalled.
The troopers may be back again. "We do have a 'Super Troopers 3: Winter Soldiers' script that we're working on," Chandrasekhar admitted.
The troupe performed in “Broken Lizard Stand Up” for Comedy Central in 2010. Broken Lizard also made 2004’s “Club Dread” and 2006’s “Beerfest,” which grossed $20 million.

The film also stars Casey Affleck, Sissy Spacek, Danny Glover, Tom Waits, and Tika Sumpter. Stern, Condé Nast Entertainment’s Dawn Ostroff and Jeremy Steckler, Wildwood Enterprises, Identity Films' Anthony Mastromauro, Sailor Bear’s Toby Halbrooks and James M. Johnston, and Bill Holderman. Producers are Endgame Entertainment’s James D.
5 to Robert Redford’s heist thriller "Old Man and the Gun." Fox Searchlight has given an awards-season launch date of Oct.
Over a career that spanned more than six decades, he had also become perhaps the greatest escape artist of his generation, a human contortionist who had broken out of nearly every prison he was confined in."” /> "The police were stunned when they realized that the man they had apprehended was not only seventy-eight years old — he looked, according to [Captain James] Chinn, 'as if he had just come from an Early Bird Special’ — but one of the most notorious stickup men of the twentieth century.
Redford portrays Forrest Tucker, who escaped from San Quentin State Prison at the age of 70 and pulled off an unprecedented string of heists that confounded authorities. Affleck plays a detective who becomes captivated with Tucker’s commitment to his craft and Spacek plays his romantic interest.
Executive producers on the film are Julie Goldstein, Lucas Smith, Patrick Newall, and Tango Entertainment’s Tim Headington.
Part of Grann’s story includes this passage about Tucker’s arrest in 1999:
The film is written and directed by David Lowery ("Pete’s Dragon") based on a short story by David Grann for the New Yorker, published in 2003. The Endgame Entertainment production was shot last year in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Freshman CBS multi-cam comedy "Living Biblically" has been pulled of the network's primetime schedule, Variety has confirmed.
"Living Biblically" follows a modern-day man who, at a crossroads in his life, decides to live according to the Bible. It is produced by Alcide Bava Productions in association with Warner Bros. Jacobs, “The Year of Living Biblically." It stars Jay R. The show is based on the bestselling book by A.J. Writer Patrick Walsh serves as executive producer with "Big Bang Theory" star Johnny Galecki, Andrew Haas, and Spencer Medof. Ferguson, Lindsey Kraft, Ian Gomez, David Krumholtz, Tony Rock, and Camryn Manheim. Television and CBS Television Studios.
More to come…” />
"Big Bang Theory" repeats will air in the show's Monday timeslot for the next two weeks. CBS has thus far renewed 17 of their current series, but none of their Monday comedies. “Kevin Can Wait,” “Man With a Plan,” and “Superior Donuts” are all awaiting words on potential third seasons. No return date has been set, which does not bode well for a potential second season. Fellow Monday series "Scorpion" is also currently in limbo.