On the moody “Majesty,” Minaj uses a menacing voice in her display of money and power, while guest singer Labrinth breathily introduces her highness during its chorus. Minaj wraps with a creepily weird, child-like coda, slowed for chilling effect as she hoots, “Say your prayers, 'cause you 'bout to die slow.” Then Eminem bursts in with a sneeringly clear and lightning-quick bit — even faster than the syllables-per-second of “Rap God” — that ranges from the lameness of new-fangled hip-hop to sex with strangers.
Elsewhere, Grande and The Weeknd make back-to-back appearances on the vaguely romantic, vexingly sensual “Bed” and “Thought I Knew You,” respectively; and the late-night AutoTune of “Nip Tuck,” and the dreamy, space-soul of “Sir” — featuring tourmate Future — allows Minaj a melodious shot at soft, subtone rapping in a manner not unlike a saxophone’s gentle toot.
Minaj’s fourth album is powered by more-focused-than-usual melodies (showing the influence of Trinidadian/Jamaican reggae and Middle Eastern musicality), infectious samples and her trademark mix of foul-mouthed, cocksure rap attacks and sonorous but equally ribald vocals. And while there are cameos from Eminem, The Weeknd, Ariana Grande, Future and Foxy Brown, Minaj is always the focus, working at the top of her game through exquisite space-soul ballads such as “Come See About Me” or ominously melodic hip-hop tracks like the pillow-talking “Rich Sex.” There’s less quirk than quake to the production, which has an oddly direct, elevated uniformity of tone, despite collaborators ranging from Boi-1da and Supa Dups to J. Reid and Mike Will Made It.
Dag.
It’s a rare moment of tenderness from an artist who, with "Queen," is doubling down on both her toughness and her regal status.” />
Defending her crown and rude (yet hilarious) sexuality are the main points of tracks such as the horrorcore hop “Hard White” (“I'm who they wishin' to be / These hoes is on the 'gram”), and the ragga lullaby “Miami” (“Too much money, I ain't never need a sugar daddy / I'm LaBelle of the ball, you could call me Patti”). But when it comes to the hard stuff, the album’s two best tracks come early and swiftly, threatening to front-load “Queen.”
The only track more barbed is “Barbie Dreams,” a hilarious rap attack modeled after the Notorious B.I.G.’s “Just Playing (Dreams)” and its rip on popular female R&B singers of his day — except this time, it’s the men of hip-hop who get a playful beat-down. “Drake worth a hundred milli, always buying me sh– / But I don’t know if the pussy wet or if he’s crying and sh–”; “I tried to f— 50 [Cent] for a powerful hour/ But all that n—a wanna do is talk Power for hours”; ex-boyfriend “Meek [Mill] still be in my DMs, I be having to duck him/ ‘I used to pray for times like this,’ face ass when I f— him”; and arguably best of all, “Had to cancel DJ Khaled, boy, we ain’t speaking / Ain’t no fat n—a telling me what he ain’t eating.”
Yet there’s little preparation for the righteous and surprisingly conventional “Come See About Me,” a soft, sculpted ballad that allows Minaj’s rap-singing romanticism to nestle in a richly opulent setting, not unlike an Ed Sheeran melody.
Date changes. Delays. Dick jokes. And a last-minute release-date-change announced on her new Apple Beats 1 radio show, followed by fantastically weird commentary. We’d expect nothing less from Nicki Minaj and the album she’s titled “Queen,” an epic 19-track collection that stands as her best and boldest recorded work to date. Diss tracks that she insists aren’t really diss tracks.

They give the money, but they don’t say even one word to you about how the film should be. "To criticize a film is not an easy thing. That’s not true. They would have to discuss the film with you, and nobody knows anything about cinema. People think that when you get money from the government, you are not free anymore. “They don’t say anything," he said. It doesn’t affect your independence in any way.”
Ceylan said he never employs storyboards while making his films. "It restricts my vision, storyboards. When I go to the set, I like to be free, free to change. I have some ideas beforehand, but when I go to the set, I start from zero…. You have to be open to that, and you have to trust yourself….I don’t think much about how I shoot something. When you go to the set, everything can change.
He said it was perhaps the subject matter and social situations of the setting that pushed him in that direction. Ceylan took issue with the view that “The Wild Pear Tree,” about a young college graduate considering a career as a teacher in a rural village while also seeking to publish his first book – was more openly political than his past films.
He also addressed the perceived political symbolism of his work and described the use of such accepted cinematic techniques as storyboarding as creatively stifling. In an often humorous talk, Ceylan, who accepted the Honorary Heart of Sarajevo Award for his contribution to cinema on the opening night of the festival, spoke about staying true to artistic vision while remaining open to change.
In the editing, often the much better shot is the one you didn’t like in the shooting.” He should be suspicious all the time; he should be afraid. In the shooting, what you like most is generally what you like least in the editing. “A director should never be sure of anything.
The Sarajevo Film Festival is showcasing eight of Ceylan's films as part of its retrospective, including 1997’s “The Small Town”; 2002’s “Distant”; 2011’s “Once Upon a Time in Anatolia”; and “Winter Sleep.” “The Wild Pear Tree” unspools in the separate In Focus sidebar.” />
Acclaimed Turkish director Nuri Bilge Ceylan discussed his career and the need for creative independence during a wide-ranging conversation Saturday at the Sarajevo Film Festival, where he is being honored with a retrospective.
Asked about changes to his style in his more recent films, such as 2014 Palme d'Or winner “Winter Sleep” and his latest work, “The Wild Pear Tree,” including the greater use of dialogue and shorter shots, Ceylan said: “That’s difficult to explain. These are all instinctive processes. I never plan it; I just do it – it’s a feeling. When it comes to defining it, it’s difficult for me.”
He noted that people often examine his films for symbolic meaning, like the shot of a Turkish flag or the titles of books in a particular scene in his latest work, but that there was none intended. “When you make a film people look at every detail. But it’s not your film anymore after you finish it, so what can you do?” He set out to make a film about the human condition, about loneliness, not social conditions, which is something that does not motivate him, Ceylan said.
"This fear motivates me. But it doesn’t mean that I will always make films like this one.” Using more dialogue in his newest film was a challenge. “It makes me afraid because it might not work," Ceylan said.
You cannot change anything anymore, unlike a writer, who can always go back and change everything.” Stressing that shooting is the most creative process in making a film, Ceylan said: “In the editing, what you shoot is what you have.
While discussing the fact that “The Wild Pear Tree” was his first major international co-production, Ceylan said he had never faced any forms of censorship in Turkey.

1 slot over "Mission: Impossible – Fallout," which picked up $20 million in its third outing for a domestic tally of $162 million. Warner Bros.' big-budget shark thriller opened well above expectations, biting off $44.5 million when it opened in 4,118 North American locations. That was easily enough to nab the No.
"It's just good popcorn entertainment that didn't take itself too seriously," he said. "It's silly, it's fun, and it lets audiences have a good time."
Jeff Goldstein, Warner Bros.' head of domestic distribution, attributes the better-than-expected opening to the studio's marketing campaign, along with a non-competitive August debut.
Bo Burnham's coming of age drama picked up another $1.6 million in its fifth frame, taking its domestic tally past $10 million. A24's "Eighth Grade" hit an achievement of its own.
Sony's "Slender Man" also bowed nationwide this weekend, landing in fourth with $11.3 million in 2,358 locations. That's a solid start given the low-budget thriller carries a $10 million price tag.
Meanwhile, Disney's "Christopher Robin" earned $12.7 million in its sophomore frame, landing the fantasy drama based on the characters from Winnie the Pooh in third place. To date, it has generated $50.3 million in North America.
"Spike has been able to bring something to the conversation of America that people haven't been able to have." "Theaters told us repeatedly over the weekend that audiences were applauding, laughing, emotional, and some in tears by the film,” Focus Features' president of distribution Lisa Bunnell said.
The best per-screen average, however, went to Oscilloscope's "Madeline's Madeline," which pocketed $20,000 from one venue. At the speciality box office, Magnolia Pictures' "Skate Kitchen" bowed with $17,000 when it opened in just one location.
"The Meg" devoured the competition at the domestic box office.
Universal's jukebox musical "Mamma Mia! The sequel has generated over $280 million worldwide. Here We Go Again" reached a major milestone this weekend, crossing $100 million at the domestic box office.
Fellow newcomer "BlacKkKlansman" debuted in fifth place with $10.8 million in 1,500 locations, earning director Spike Lee his best opening in over a decade. Lee's Cannes Grand Prix-winning crime drama, which debuted on the first anniversary of the deadly Charlottesville rally, has maintained enthusiasm with a promising 97% Rotten Tomatoes rating and an A- CinemaScore.
Horror auteurs Jason Blum and Jordan Peele co-produced the Focus Features title, which tells the true story of black detective Ron Stallworth (John David Washington), who goes undercover — with the help of Jewish cop Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver) — to infiltrate the Colorado Springs chapter of the Ku Klux Klan.
It's not quite in the black yet, but it's off to a good start given a $96.8 million international tally, including a strong $50 million in the Middle Kingdom. "The Meg," which is a co-production with China, will still have to secure big returns overseas to justify its expensive $130 million production budget. Imax screens accounted for $13.6 million of "The Meg's" $141.3 million global total.
With $44.5 million, "The Meg" secured the best opening of the year for Warner Bros., ahead of "Ready Player One" ($41.7 million) and "Ocean's 8" ($41.6 million).
The final weekend opener, "Dog Days," picked up $2.6 million when it launched in 2,442 locations.
His latest outing, “Chi-Raq,” picked up $2.5 million during its limited theatrical run ahead of an Amazon release. Prior to "BlacKkKlansman," Lee's recent biggest opening was his 2006 film, “Inside Man,” which launched with $28 million.
Thanks to a surprisingly powerful debut from "The Meg," the weekend-to-date number is up 23.7% from the same frame last year, when "Annabelle: Creation" launched with $35 million.” /> The summer box office remains strong, up a promising 11.2% from last year, according to comScore.

On Friday, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders released a statement condemning the book.
"I was complicit with this White House deceiving this nation — they continue to deceive this nation," she said.
WASHINGTON — NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday aired Omarosa Manigault Newman's recording of her firing by White House Chief of Staff John Kelly in December, and she said that she considers what Kelly said a "threat."
She also said that her conversation with Kelly took place in the White House situation room, an area that is typically off limits to personal recording devices and cell phones.
Manigault Newman appeared on the program in advance of the Tuesday publication of her new memoir "Unhinged: An Insider's Account of the Trump White House."
Manigault Newman said that she had a "blind spot" when it came to President Trump. Trump blamed the violence on "many sides," rather than condemning the white supremacists who were protesting. She said that she was "totally complicit" when she defended the president after the Charlottesville riots one year ago.
"It’s sad that a disgruntled former White House employee is trying to profit off these false attacks, and even worse that the media would now give her a platform, after not taking her seriously when she had only positive things to say about the President during her time in the administration.” On Saturday, Trump called Manigault Newman a "lowlife." “Instead of telling the truth about all the good President Trump and his administration are doing to make America safe and prosperous, this book is riddled with lies and false accusations," she said.
https://twitter.com/MeetThePress/status/1028632732421812225″ />
Kelly is heard on the recording telling Manigault Newman that she is being fired over "integrity violations." In her interview with Todd, Manigault Newman called on the White House to release her employee file so "the American people will see that I worked my butt off for this country."
"I heard his voice as clear as you and I are sitting here," she said. Manigault Newman said that Trump "never said the n-word in my presence," but in her book she cites unnamed sources who claim to know of the existence of a recording where the president uses that word on the set of "The Apprentice." She told Todd that she heard a recording of Trump using the n-word.
Ronna McDaniel, the chairwoman of the Republican National Committee, wrote in a tweet, "Who in their right mind thinks it's appropriate to secretly record the White House chief of staff in the Situation Room?"
"I think it's important to understand that if we make this a friendly departure, we can all be, you know, you can look at your time here at the White House as a year of service to the nation, and then you can go on without any difficulty in the future relative to your reputation," Kelly tells her in the recording.
Manigault Newman told Todd that she made the recordings of conversations because "this is a White House where everybody lies" and "you have to have your back."
And if I didn't have these recordings, no one in America would believe me. So I protected myself and now I am glad I did." "It is very obvious a threat. And things getting ugly for me, and damage to my reputation, that is downright criminal. He goes on to say that things can get ugly for you," Manigault told "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd. "The chief of staff of the United States, under direction of the president of the United States, threatening me on damage to my reputation.


She was one of the highest paid employees on the White House staff, given a salary of almost $180,000 a year. Manigault Newman served as special assistant to the president, and was tasked with outreach to the African American community.


https://twitter.com/idriselba/status/1028552314183999488″ />
Idris Elba has — possibly? — given his two cents on the rumors that he's been floated as a new James Bond.


Current Bond actor Daniel Craig confirmed he would be returning to the role for Bond 25, and according to sources, Broccoli and Eon are currently meeting with actresses and actors for the female lead and villain for the film — not trying to find someone to replace Craig in Bond 26.
Fuqua's representatives refuted the story, however, stating that no such conversation ever took place.


On Sunday, Elba posted a series of cryptic tweets, beginning with a heavily filtered selfie accompanied by the caption "my name's Elba, Idris Elba," a clear reference to the famous line spoken by Bond.
A few hours later, however, he posted an image of the rap group Public Enemy and followed it up with the titular lyric from one of their most famous songs, "Don't Believe The Hype." Whether or not that puts to bed the rumors circulating that Elba is being eyed as the next Bond remains to be seen.
Though Elba's name has been put forth for years by fans as a possible option for the first non-white Bond, the rumor mill was set off again after the Daily Star published a story last week that Bond producer Barbara Broccoli told director Antoine Fuqua it was time to cast a non-white actor in the role, and said Elba would be a good fit.

"Mamma Mia! In North America, the jukebox musical crossed the $100 million mark, including $5.8 million this weekend. Here We Go Again" had another strong outing abroad, picking up $21.5 million this weekend, bringing its worldwide tally to $280.8 million.
It opens next in Korea, followed by Australia, France, and Japan. "The Meg" was a co-production with the Middle Kingdom, so the studio is banking on solid returns in China to get the movie in the black. The big-budget shark thriller, which carries a hefty $130 million price tag, had the best opening in China with $50.3 million when it opened on 12,650 screens. Other top markets include Mexico ($6.2 million from 2,739 screens), Russia ($5 million from 2,622 screens), the United Kingdom ($4.4 million from 750 screens), and Spain ($2.4 million from 307 screens).
"The Meg" took a shark-sized bite out of the international box office.
The Warner Bros. popcorn season flick had a strong debut overseas, generating $97 million in 42 international territories. "The Meg" launched with $44.5 million in North America for a global start of $141.3 million.
The superhero sequel is now Pixar's highest release of all time, with $1.08 billion globally.” /> Fellow Disney title, "Incredibles 2," earned $14.6 million in 34 markets, along with $3.5 million domestically for a weekend total of $18.1 million.
In Mexico, the animated title has brought in $25.5 million to date, followed by Brazil with $18 million, Russia with $17.7 million, and the U.K. with $14.4 million. Another sequel, Sony's "Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation" amassed $17.1 million, taking its international total to $231.4 million. It has yet to launch in China. It debuted in South Korea this weekend with $3.4 million from 500 screens.
The Universal sequel opened in Korea with $6.6 million, Singapore with $258,000, and Peru with $227,000. and Ireland, picking up $4.2 million, followed by Germany ($1.6 million), and Australia ($1.2 million). Among holdovers, the movie remained strong in the U.K.
The fantasy drama, based on the characters from Winnie the Pooh, bowed in Belgium with $200,000 and the Netherlands with $300,000. Combined with $12.4 million in North America, it has made $62.1 million globally. Meanwhile, Disney's "Christopher Robin" pocketed $3.8 million in 25 international territories.

I’m torn, y’all help. In the weeks before the album’s scheduled Aug. “Had no clue it sampled the legend #TracyChapman — do I keep my date & lose the record? Or do I lose the record & keep my date? 10 release, Minaj tweeted that legal complications over a sample by folk-rock singer Tracy Chapman was holding up the album’s release. Ugh! omg for the love of #Queen.” Tracy Chapman, can you please hit me. “So there’s a record on #Queen that features 1of the greatest rappers of all time,” she wrote in a series of tweets that have since been deleted. ‍Do we push #Queen back 1week?


 
 ” />
Apparently she got her answer, because later, in another since-deleted tweet, Minaj wrote, “Sis said no,” with a shrug emoji.
It incorporates Shelly Thunder’s song “Sorry,” which itself interpolates Chapman’s “Baby Can I Hold You” — and features Nas. And less than two days later, via Funkmaster Flex, here is “Sorry,” a Caribbean-flavored, melodic track that would have been one of “Queen's" strongest tracks — although at 19 tracks, that album is arguably long enough (and then some) as it is. Check it out below, and read Variety’s review of “Queen” right here.
17th, but instead surprise-dropped the album on the 10th after all — which seems to have ended up amplifying the buzz around it even more. While Minaj did indeed say that the album’s release would be pushed back a week to Aug.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-A5YRpLKTto
Late Saturday night, Nicki Minaj and Nas dropped “Sorry,” a song that was cut at the last minute from Minaj’s fourth album, which was surprise-released amid considerable drama on Friday — and “Sorry” was a piece of that puzzle.

— is really about. "BlacKkKlansman" is the movie of the moment because it dramatizes, in an electrifying way, the link between the cult of white supremacy and the cult of the White House. That’s what his famous declaration about what would happen if he stood in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shot someone — that none of his voters would abandon him! It’s about the level of loyalty that cult leaders, rather than mere politicians, inspire. The fascist movements of the 20th century were also cults, led by cult leaders: Hitler, Mao, Pol Pot. It’s about how our nation has come to have a heart so dark that it needs deprogramming.” /> More and more people are starting to say that Donald Trump’s presidency is a cult. The point isn’t that Trump is their equivalent, but that the cult dimension of support for him is what is becoming so dangerous.
Lee has engineered "BlacKkKlansman" to be an undercover police-procedural drama that's less about the crimes of its villains than about their ways, manners, and personalities. It emerges from the way that Lee — how can I put this? I don’t mean the humanity of their racial views; those are bereft of humanity. The movie is about getting close enough to people who say the N-word to experience the essence of who they are. — wants us to feel the humanity of these people. It is even about getting close to that word. Lee wants to know why, and he wants the audience to know why; he has never lost the driving passion of a true film artist, which is curiosity. But the very fact that they’re human beings doing something that they believe in. The extraordinary hook of "BlacKkKlansman" relates to Spike Lee’s ironic empathy as a filmmaker.
Ron, as skeptical as he is solidly middle class, sets him straight. "America," he declares, "would never elect somebody like David Duke president of the United States." He now calls himself the National Director (it sounds more presentable, with less of a ring of occult torturer, than Grand Wizard), and his plan is to make himself over into a respectable politician — to take the politics of racial hatred mainstream, a movement that could theoretically result in the rise of new kind of president. The officer replies by explaining that Duke is changing the face of the KKK. Spike Lee’s "BlacKkKlansman" is the movie that puts the new transformation of America, in all its ugliness, hate, and — yes — power, onto the big screen. At one point, Ron Stallworth (John David Washington), an African-American rookie undercover cop in Colorado Springs in the late '70s, is telling a fellow officer how he was able to make a connection over the phone to David Duke (Topher Grace), the Grand Wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.
Yet the fact that one could even have that flashing thought is a sign of how quickly this country is moving in a toxically perilous direction. Let’s hear the tape. It’s time that Donald Trump’s racism was dragged, forever, out of the dog-whistle zone." But my second thought was, "God forbid, I wonder if a tape like that might actually help him." I don’t seriously believe that. Yesterday, when I read that Omarosa Manigault Newman, the "Apprentice"-diva-turned-White-House-crony-turned-seduced-and-abandoned-Trump-heretic, claims to have knowledge of a tape from the set of "The Apprentice" in which her former snake-oil mentor is heard uttering a racial slur, my first thought was, "Good!
Anyone who now denies that we have David Duke in the White House is either lying, not seeing reality, or not minding it. The refusal to condemn, which he repeated at his recent press conference keyed to the anniversary of the Charlottesville riots, equals a wink of endorsement. Trump, of course, knows the game he’s playing. It’s that simple.
It's a line that cues us to laugh. The whole exchange is a trifle gimmicky; that line about the presidency is one of those 20-20-hindsight screenwriter’s gambits designed to get a rise out of you. In this case, though, the rise happens because the parallel it forces us to confront is so startling. One of the messages of "BlacKkKlansman" is that maybe he does. And that’s not a screenwriter’s invention. That’s a fearless filmmaker slicing open the skin of America in 2018 to reveal which way our blood is flowing. But when he said it during the packed afternoon show of "BlacKkKlansman" that I attended, it was striking to hear the chortles trail off into an ominous murmur. Does Donald Trump = David Duke?
The word, in recent years, has become more taboo than ever, and that’s part of the power of hearing it in "BlacKkKlansman." The film’s most electrifying scenes are those in which Ron Stallworth’s fellow cop, Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver), becomes his partner on the case by infiltrating the Colorado Springs chapter of the Klan. He hangs out with them during their living-room confabs (which are like Rotary Club meetings with Confederate flags), cooing over their firearms, becoming an eager participant in their conversations about how to squelch the rise of black people in America and — their paranoid catechism — the conspiracy of Jews that's helped to make it possible. That draws the audience into a creepy intimacy with those thoughts. To fit in, Driver’s character, who is himself Jewish, can’t just mouth the hate. He’s got to say it like he means it.
And, most significantly, it’s there in the devout refusal of the President of the United States to distance himself from those forces and to declare them the intolerable menace they are. But when you watch "BlacKkKlansman," with its lacerating scenes of KKK house-party meetings led by Middle American rubes in Colorado Springs, it’s with a disturbing awareness that the thoughts, the feelings, and the words being expressed have been infused, over the last few years, with a newly aggressive and open presence. It’s there on social media, and in the rise of the alt-right as a "legitimate" participant in the national discourse. It's there in the acts of domestic terrorism that the whole word witnessed at Charlottesville.
That’s why it can get away with its slightly goofy mistaken-identity police plot, and with the fake-looking wig that John David Washington wears (why on earth did Lee approve a 'fro that sits on his hero’s head like a Frisbee?). Yet make no mistake: "BlacKkKlansman" is every inch a movie about what’s happening to our society today. "BlacKkKlansman" is based on a true story that took place in 1978 and 1979, when "All in the Family," blaxploitation films, and "Too Late to Turn Back Now" still lingered in the atmosphere, even as the antic communality of the '70s was crumbling into something colder.
The theme of "BlacKkKlansman" is that white supremacy is a cult: a religion of intolerance you can't argue with. It trivializes nothing to say that the film’s key Klan members, like the mild-on-the-surface Walter (Ryan Eggold) or the seething redneck Felix (Jasper Pääkkönen), are men living inside a comic book of hate. The N-word becomes a piece of horrific music in "BlacKkKlansman." It is used so relentlessly that the audience begins to hear it not just as the most hideous and violent epithet in the American language but as the cornerstone of a belief system.
Twenty years ago, or even 10 (or five), if somebody had made a period drama about a cop infiltrating the Ku Klux Klan, we could have talked about the racial hatred he was out to uncover as an American virus, a disease that won’t die; we could have talked about the importance of never pretending that it’s gone away. Yet we could still have claimed that "white supremacy," as an organized movement, was an underground force in America — a movement on the hate-fueled fringes.

Listen below:
It is based on a true story and is set in the 1970s, but the movie refers to the 2017 Charlottesville riots to show the similarities to today. The movie tells the story of Ron Stallworth, the first African-American officer on the Colorado Springs police force, who infiltrates the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan and even becomes one of its members.
— politics, we were around it." And I mean that politically," he says. "It starts at the top. "I think that culture of just insensitivity, it starts at the top. And I grew up in D.C.
It is so easy to forget women, they are fighting for their rights and equality. "It is so easy to forget Charlottesville was only a year ago. It is so easy to forget people are being shot in their backs like dogs in the streets by white racist cops. It is so easy to forget the border. "For me it is just frustrating all of the distractions that are going on," he tells Variety's "PopPolitics" on SiriusXM. A woman lost her life, and people were injured. It is so easy to forget these things, things that are echoed in this film, literally."
Listen below:
He said he doesn't know what the message of the white nationalists will be. "Everybody has a right to say what they want to say, but repercussions are real," he says.
Nikki Schwab of The New York Post and David Cohen of Variety talk about the effectiveness of protests at the White House, as Rosie O'Donnell joined demonstrators on Monday with a short speech and a handful of Broadway songs.
Hawkins, who grew up in Washington, said that the white nationalist protests happening this weekend near the White House are of concern to him because people "aren't coming to actually talk. I'm sure there are people who are coming to have a dialog, but we are not actually talking to each other. We're talking at each other.
Listen below:
Moretz portrays a teen grappling with her same-sex attraction who is sent to a religious based conversion therapy camp, whose leaders use questionable psychological practices in an effort to make their students straight. Chloe Grace Moretz and director Desiree Akhavan talk about "The Miseducation of Cameron Post," along with Mathew Shurka. Shurka went through conversion therapy and is now an activist urging an end to such practices.
He said that Lee did not make the movie to "demonize, or whatever his personal beliefs are. He wanted all of us, not just me, but Klan members, to be full dimensional characters. He was not just interested in making a mockery of them, because that is not the dialog."
ET/11 a.m.-noon PT on SiriusXM's political channel POTUS. It also is available on demand.” /> "PopPolitics," hosted by Variety's Ted Johnson, airs from 2-3 p.m.
Protests in D.C.
WASHINGTON — Corey Hawkins, who plays Kwame Ture (Stokley Carmichael) in key scenes in Spike Lee's "BlacKkKlansman," says that he thinks that the director wanted to "remind people."
'The Miseducation of Cameron Post' and Conversion Therapy

In fact, Lee asked her to walk around Brooklyn for an afternoon while wearing the wig and dressed in her film wardrobe.
Laura Harrier really want to keep the afro wig that she wore in Spike Lee’s new real-life drama "BlackKklansman."
In the movie, Harrier plays the college student activist girlfriend of Ron Stallworth, a black cop in Colorado Springs who infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan in 1978 by pretending to be white on phone calls with members of the hate group, including David Duke.
“But Spike was like, ‘No, you can’t take that.’ We’ll see if I can get my hands on it one day.” “I tried to steal it,” Harrier joked with Variety on Thursday at the Hollywood Foreign Press Association's Grants Banquet.
John David Washington, who stars as Stallworth, said music was the key to his preparation.
“I was listening to The Beatles and I was listening to Marvin Gaye obviously. “I rid myself of all R&B and hip hop for almost three months, listening to nothing but War and Jimi Hendrix, ‘Live at Woodstock,’” he said. I was watching ‘Soul Train’ every night.”” />
I just felt powerful and badass.” “All of that was actually from the ‘70s. It was just so cool to put on the clothes. I had the fro and I had the black leather jacket. “The incredible costume designer Marci Rodgers sourced all original vintage,” Harrier said.
“People were like, ‘Yes, soul sister!’…I felt really empowered.” “People were giving me black power fists,” Harrier said.