Top holdovers include France ($1.3 million in 47 locations), Japan ($1.3 million on 367 screens), and Germany ($919,000 in 476 venues). The sixth iteration also launched in Italy with $2.7 million in 696 locations, and in Greece with $397,000 in 99 venues. That ranks as the biggest Middle Kingdom opening for both a "Mission: Impossible" installment and a Cruise movie.
Tom Cruise's latest mission is nowhere near complete.
To date, it has made $17.5 million internationally and $39.4 million domestically.” /> Elsewhere, "BlacKkKlansman" picked up $4.8 million this weekend in 18 international territories. It premiered in the Netherlands ($570,000 in 85 locations), Peru ($18,000 in 10 locations), and Trinidad and the Caribbean ($14,000).
In total, it generated $89.1 million in 65 international markets this weekend, bringing its overseas tally to $442.7 million. It crossed $200 million in North America for a global total of $649 million. "Mission: Impossible – Fallout" topped the international box office, thanks to a massive $77.3 million opening in China.
"Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again" bowed in Chile with $137,000 in 62 locations for an international weekend total of $7.6 million. Universal's musical sequel has earned $367.1 million worldwide, including $249.1 million overseas and $118 million in North America.
Fellow Warner Bros. To date, the shark thriller has earned $342.3 million internationally and $462.8 million worldwide. This weekend, "The Meg" generated $2.5 million in France, followed by $1.5 million in China, and $1.3 million in Mexico. title "The Meg" pocketed $17.7 million in 66 overseas markets this weekend.
At the domestic box office, Sony's thriller with John Cho, Debra Messing, and Michelle La generated $5.6 million this weekend. It debuted in South Korea with $4.1 million and in the United Kingdom with $1 million. Among new offerings, "Searching" took in $5.9 million in seven international marketings, taking its overseas tally to $6.5 million.
romantic comedy just crossed $100 million. That brings its overseas tally to $19.9 million. Other top markets include Singapore ($1.1 million on 47 screens), Philippines ($749,000 on 177 screens), and Malaysia ($476,000 on 155 screens). In North America, the Warner Bros. Meanwhile, "Crazy Rich Asians" launched in Australia with $5.4 million for a weekend total of $10.4 million in 24 international territories.

The brothers are his hitmen, trouble-shooting fixers, and thugs of all trades. Eli Sisters (Reilly) is the older and more responsible of the two, and also the more fretful, while Charlie Sisters (Phoenix) is a drunk who carries an attitude of jovial recklessness. The two take the piss out of each other on a daily basis but also work together like a well-oiled six-gun. They’re heartlessly efficient killers who can drop into any situation, and after firing away — the gun shots on the soundtrack are notably blasty and intense — will always leave a trail of corpses.
A man named Hermann Warm (Riz Ahmed) has run out on a debt; he's being pursued by a detective (Jake Gyllenhaal) who's contracted to deliver him to the brothers. But along the way, the detective, played by Gyllenhaal as a friendly dandy who speaks in a ridiculously cultivated accent, winds up bonding with Hermann, and the two decide to become business partners. The movie traces the gradual unraveling of Eli and Charlie’s sibling-killer act after the Commodore gives them a routine assignment. Hermann, a would-be prospector with a background in chemistry, has invented a formula that’s pure gold: an acidic liquid that, when poured into a river, will light up any gold rocks in it. The brothers are supposed to retrieve Hermann, torture him until he gives up the formula, then kill him.
In a festival line-up, it’s not just a matter of what’s “better” — it’s a matter of what’s better because it's different. Yet there’s another issue that's every bit as urgent. Quality is a subjective thing, but let's say, for the sake of argument, that you had two films of comparable quality, one directed by a man, the other directed by a woman. Isn’t it likely that the more diversifying choice might also be, in terms of what’s up on-screen, the fresher choice?
The movie, which is one of the 21 competition films, stars Joaquin Phoenix and John C. I thought of this, in light of the competition line-up, when I saw "The Sisters Brothers," a violent Western picaresque that rambles and rough-rides like some quirky horse opera from the '70s — but since it no longer is the '70s, it plays a lot slower. Reilly as the Sisters brothers, notorious sibling outlaws who work for an Oregon City mobster known as the Commodore (Rutger Hauer, who is seen only from a distance and has no lines).
When they finally catch up to Hermann and Gyllenhaal’s John Morris, they’ve beaten down enough to join forces with them — which seems like it might be a slightly lazy sentimental turn, and is, until you see what happens when too much of Hermann’s chemical formula gets poured into a river. It is not pretty. A large spider crawls into Eli’s gullet while he’s sleeping, causing him to get sick, and the brothers take major punches at each other (Charlie compares Eli’s left hook to being whacked with a shovel). Yet "The Sisters Brothers" has a rough-and-tumble absurdist cynicism about it. It keeps dragging its characters down, sort of the way the Coen brothers might, though with more ferocity and less style. There’s a lot of grueling hardship on display. Riz Ahmed plays Hermann with his usual commanding snap, and we want to see him succeed.
But it does get you wondering if there's another film that might have brought the Venice competition more adventure.” /> "The Sisters Brothers" is too light to be a true drama and too heavy to be a comedy. It’s that timeless movie thing, a lark, and on that level it works just fine. It’s a movie that makes even its own glimmer of originality feel slightly musty. But it’s a lark that plods on more than it takes wing. Nothing wrong with that.
The staggering lack of gender parity in this year’s Venice Film Festival competition slate — a grand total of 21 films, only one of which was directed by a woman — has produced a pledge, on the part of the festival, to correct that situation in the future. The most obvious question to ask is: Could every film that wound up in the competition really have been "better" than every last film, directed by a woman, that was submitted and rejected? Like many observers, I overwhelmingly suspect that the answer is no. That’s a good start, yet it’s worth pondering why the numbers were so egregiously off in the first place.
The overly aggressive archness of the thing? I kept wondering: Is it the pace? There’s room in the world for a movie like "The Sisters Brothers," but it’s serving a reheated version of worn-to-the-bone male obsessions. "The Sisters Brothers" is the first English-language feature made by the French director Jacques Audiard ("A Prophet," "Dheepan"), and it’s a highly companionable Western, structured as a journey of discovery, full of salty dialogue that the actors chew on like beef jerky. Reilly’s straight-shooter performance, yet I also found myself, at certain points, growing impatient with it. I enjoyed the film as far is it goes, especially John C. "The Sisters Brothers" isn’t a bad film, but a woman, if I can say this, would never have bothered to make it. Then I realized that what struck me as a touch wearying about "The Sisters Brothers" is that every last element of it — the brotherly bluster, the hostile japery, the killings, the plot that keeps bending around corners that don’t necessarily take it anywhere more interesting — is just so damn familiar. And it made me wish, frankly, that I was seeing something bolder and newer.

Argento, who was dating the show's host Anthony Bourdain at the time of his death, appeared in two episodes of the series and directed a third.
Argento had reportedly paid off actor Jimmy Bennett, who claims Argento assaulted him when he was 17 and she was 37. As a child actor, Bennett played the son of Argento's character in the movie "The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things," which Argento also directed. The New York Times published an expose claiming Argento reached a $380,000 settlement with Bennett last year, months after Argento came forward with rape allegations against Harvey Weinstein.
Following news of the scandal, Argento was also axed as a judge on "X Factor Italy."” />
A CNN spokesperson confirmed to BuzzFeed News that all three episodes were removed from CNN's streaming service, CNN Go, due to the allegations against Argento.
CNN has pulled episodes of "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown" that feature Asia Argento in wake of sexual harassment allegations against the actress.
"In light of the recent news reports about Asia Argento, CNN will discontinue airing past episodes of Parts Unknown that included her, until further notice," the spokesperson told BuzzFeed.
After allegations surfaced, Argento denied having "any sexual relationship" with Bennett, and said Bourdain urged her to reach a financial settlement to end Bennett's "long-standing persecution" of her.

Listen below:
"PopPolitics," hosted by Variety's Ted Johnson, airs from 2-3 p.m. ET/11 a.m.-noon PT on SiriusXM's political channel POTUS. It also is available on demand.” />
Weitz and Isaac attended a recent screening of "Operation Finale" at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington.
Malkin's sister died in the Holocaust along with other relatives, and some of the key scenes are conversations between Eichmann and Malkin. Oscar Isaac plays Peter Malkin, the secret agent who physically nabbed Eichmann, portrayed by Ben Kingsley, and later is assigned to guard him in a hideout as they wait for a transport back to Israel.
We have to build a nation, move on." He wasn't supposed to talk to the guy… Move forward. His natural curiosity and his unresolved issues that he had, because he exemplified what was happening for a lot of people at that time in Israel, which was just don't talk about it. "He was supposed to just be the muscle. "It's so psychologically fraught, what he had to do, the courage of Peter Malkin to be in that room," Isaac says.
WASHINGTON — "Operation Finale," the new movie about the Israeli Mossad's capture of Adolf Eichmann, portrays the former Nazi leader as a family man living a quiet life in 1960s Argentina.
…But then when confronted with this pure evil, and seeing that it is just this sad guy. It is almost more shameful that this is the person that did this to our people, not some mythical demon." It festers. He continued, "But as we all know, it just stays there.
"But I think one of the theses of the film is that the people who perpetrated these crimes were normal people, perhaps ambitious, perhaps careerists, in Eichmann's case very manipulative, but people nonetheless. We have to face up to the possibility that in the right situations we ourselves might be involved in something like this." "We would like to kind of dismiss these perpetrators of the Holocaust as 'the other,' as Nazis and stock villains and Germany as a unique scenario, Germany in the 1930s" director Chris Weitz tells Variety's "PopPolitics" podcast on SiriusXM.

“Cartoon Network was not afraid to says no,” says series showrunner Adam Muto. “We had to make the case to them. … I remember the early days and how we had to fight.” But Cartoon Network, when they saw the results and resonance of every episode, gave creator Pendleton Ward and his brain trust more freedom.
So after such an unprecedented run, Muto is now mulling several projects.   “I am trying to be thoughtful about it. I got really lucky.” But he notes that he can’t coast on the “Adventure Time” influence.
I just hope they feel something. “I do hope they feel something — the most I can hope for is that they feel something. I was very fortunate to work with this crew," he says. Happiness, joy, sadness. It’s so collaborative — the writers, designers, the crew — it’s too much to pin on one person.
"I imagine every show  what is idea time to say goodbye to a character," he says. “A song was important because of the role of songs have played in the show,” says Muto.
He’s hoping the fans get something from the finale.
They brought back “Adventure Time” alumna Rebecca Sugar — busy with hit ‘Steven Universe” — to write an iconic song for the finale.
That longevity (it debuted in 2010) is a remarkable feat, considering that the series was never meant to appeal to the lowest common denominator with its fantasia of characters that includes Jake the Dog, who talks and can morph into almost anything, Marceline the Vampire Queen, Princess Bubblegum and Lady Rainicorn, a half-rainbow, half-unicorn, Korean-speaking girlfriend of Finn the Human.
Faced with a finale for the entire series, the staff ticked through some elements: What the payoff? How to tie up the stories? How to say goodbye to the characters? What about a song?
“We were very fortunate that people watched and liked it.”” />
But despite the fantastical elements, the show always delivered genuine emotion.
The finale makes poignant use of his character’s journey.   Fans also note that Finn has grown up and matured through the years. As has Jeremy Shada, who started voicing Finn when he was 12; he’s now 22.
4, an “Adventure Time” DVD box set set will be released, with seasons 8 through 10. On Sept. “Adventure Time,” the beloved and groundbreaking animated series on Cartoon Network, ends its 10-season run Sept. 3 on Cartoon Network.
“And it was important to bring Rebecca back to write the song … because the role of songs have played in the show.” “A song is more effective than a bunch of people fighting,” says Muto.
“We were able to be more experimental and explore secondary characters,” says Muto.

The Venice premieres of Damien Chazelle's "First Man" and Luca Guadagnino's remake of horror classic "Suspiria," among others, have also been greeted with standing ovations on the Lido.” />
The cast also includes Riz Ahmed, Rebecca Root, Rutger Hauer, and Carol Kane. After the premiere, actor John C. Reilly, director Jacques Audiard, and composer Alexandre Desplat were beaming as they congratulated each other. The film's co-stars Joaquin Phoenix and Jake Gyllenhaal were not at the screening.
Earlier in the day, “The Sisters Brothers” also received an enthusiastic response at a press screening, where some members of the audience cheered as the credits rolled.
In his review for Variety, chief film critic Owen Gleiberman called it "a Western ramble that's witty and watchable yet still a touch wearying."
At an afternoon news conference, Audiard called on film festivals, including Venice, to have better representation of women — even though "The Sisters Brothers" itself has hardly any female characters, and not a single one in a major role. Reilly acknowledged that disparity, but contended that the film itself addresses "masculinity and the gender balance" and noted that half of the movie's crew members were women.
Audiences gave "The Sister Brothers" a five-minute standing ovation following its debut at the Venice Film Festival.

Still, that shouldn’t stop her from branching out, and it’s our gain that she does in “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” an unexpectedly profound, incredibly true dramedy in which she plays Lee Israel, a miserable Manhattan author who resorted to forging letters by famous writers in order to pay the bills — and found the basis for her most successful book in the process. For a comedian like Adam Sandler or Jim Carrey, it takes “serious” roles to get respect, but not so Melissa McCarthy, who earned an Oscar nomination for her breakout performance in “Bridesmaids” and has been a critical darling ever since.
And so begins a lucrative new hobby composing letters “written by” her favorite literary figures — letters whose value scales in direct proportion to their content. In a twist that seems just a bit too fortuitous (and which makes her subsequent criminal career seem almost accidental, rather than calculated), she stumbles upon a pair of letters written by Brice while researching her subject, stealing them from the library and selling them to a local bookshop owner (Dolly Wells) for a nice sum — even nicer, she finds, when she embellishes the second with a witty postscript of her own invention.
Certainly, Heller shows enormous affection for Lee, whom most of us probably couldn’t stand if we met her on the street. Made up almost entirely of moth browns and itchy-looking grey fabrics, the costumes and production design contribute an enormous assist to defining McCarthy’s character (one desperately wants to open the windows on the movie to let in some fresh air), though it takes an actress as delightful as she to make such a woman not just forgivable, but downright lovable.” /> Nor would we want to spend two minutes in her apartment — a packrat’s paradise, chock full of filing cabinets and crawling with flies, where years of cat feces have accumulated under the bed.
Grant, in his most outrageous role in “Withnail & I”), a fellow alcoholic and New York gadfly who became both a friend and accomplice during this period, assisting Lee in selling her letters after the various dealers started to get suspicious. But that’s ignoring the most immediate benefit McCarthy conveys in the film: Lee was an incredibly solitary person, having long since alienated her former lover (who appears late in the film in a scene that suggests the bitter Lee had rewritten her own history most of all), and yet, she managed to open up somewhat during her letter-writing days. It was then that the hard-drinking misanthrope happened to be reunited with Jack Hock (Richard E.
But, of course (and this is why critics love watching cut-ups reveal their more introspective side), it’s the human side of the character that makes this McCarthy’s best performance to date, revealing haunting insights into friendship, loneliness, and creative insecurity. Dowdy, half-soused, and frowning for nearly the entire running time, McCarthy earns nearly as many laughs playing this curmudgeonly cat lady as she does in her more irrepressible comedic parts. The fact that it does so from a uniquely female perspective is a bonus at this particular moment.
Watching the trailer for “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” one gets the impression that Fox Searchlight is trying to hide (or at least downplay) the homosexual side of this story: Lee was a lesbian, while the openly gay Jack can hardly pass a fire hydrant without asking for its phone number. Together, they make a fabulous duo, a pair of outsiders hilariously passing judgment on polite society, taking platonic comfort in one another’s company — they would go out to bars together and amuse themselves making crank calls to people they hated — rather than putting themselves out there romantically (although Jack enjoys his flings, the old rapscallion). McCarthy makes Lee’s longing for companionship felt in a series of visits to her favorite bookshop, culminating in a date with Wells’ character that she rather painfully manages to sabotage (McCarthy’s real-life husband Ben Falcone appears as the most foolish of the collectors to buy Israel’s letters).
Because Lee herself was a frustrated writer, she channeled her wit into her work, allowing the late Noël Coward, Lillian Hellman, and Dorothy Parker to take credit for some of her best zingers (like the one that gives the film its title). Perhaps Lee Israel had a similar experience in channeling the voices of her idols. Whether true or not, Hunter S. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby” in order to get a sense for how it felt to write a masterpiece. In many ways, her most celebrated book is the one she wrote about the three-year period, during which she forged more than 400 letters (even going so far as to steal and copy some from archives). Thompson is said to have retyped F.
But no one wanted her next book, which was to be about vaudeville comedian Fanny Brice, and she was getting desperate — which in Lee’s case, meant that her already unpleasant demeanor became even more combative with the few people she had in her corner. Prior to 1991, the 51-year-old author had enjoyed some publishing success, writing biographies on the likes of Tallulah Bankhead, Dorothy Kilgallen, and Estée Lauder.
Consider the scene early on when Lee crashes a party at her agent’s fancy New York apartment. There, at the center of the room, is Tom Clancy, who bloviates, “Writers block is a term invented by the writing community to justify their laziness. As the saying goes, “Lord, give me the confidence of a mediocre white man.” Though it never hammers the point, this movie — co-written by a woman (Nicole Holofcener) and helmed by one as well (“Diary of a Teenage Girl” director Marielle Heller) — poignantly reminds that men never seem to appreciate how good they have it, even if no one made things more difficult for Lee Israel than Lee Israel made them for herself. My success is nothing more than that I have the dedication and stamina to sit and get the work done.” Lee harumphs as she passes (she harumphs a lot in this movie, finding it easier to resent others than it is to change her own ways), but it’s a revealing moment.

"There are so many more arrows in our quiver at a time when it's harder and harder to get people to come out." "It's FOMO — the fear of missing out — and it's much different seeing it in the theaters than staying at home," he says.
Dergarabedian says safety concerns led studios to shift to an earlier start, which "reflects the sensitivity of studios and exhibitors to the ever changing nature of society and its sometimes unpredictable impact on the marketplace."
"The number in theory is a great indicator of first weekend box office potential," he notes, with the caveat the it reflects enthusiastic die hard fans and doesn't take into account constantly evolving social media sentiment.
Fox distribution chief Chris Aronson points to the "Deadpool" movies, which generated $12.7 million in previews in 2016 and $18.6 million this year.
"Star Wars: The Force Awakens" still holds the record for pre-shows with a stunning $57 million in Thursday night showings in 2015, followed by $45 million for 2017's "Star Wars: The Last Jedi," $43 million for 2011's "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" and $39 million for this year's "Avengers: Infinity Wars."
16. Thursday night preview grosses for Marvel's "Black Panther" came in at $25.2 million, serving as the first indication that the groundbreaking superhero movie was going to obliterate initial forecasts estimating a range between $100 million to $120 million. The opening total wound up at a stunning $202 million. The Wakanda Forever movement got a headstart as moviegoers were eager to get a jump on the hit movie. A similar scenario had played out on an larger larger scale on Feb.
And while Friday nights were traditionally the big opening nights, Thursdays give moviegoers another chance to get tickets for possible sold-out titles.
9, Warner Bros. executives made an unexpectedly pleasant discovery: "The Meg," their prehistoric shark movie that cost $150 million and took over two decades to get to the big screen, wasn't going to bomb. On the night of Aug.
"What happened with 'The Meg' previews is that we were able to get the word out early that the movie is a lot of fun," noted Jeff Goldstein, Warner's domestic distribution chief.
Focus Features distribution chief Lisa Bunnell emphasizes that the range of films that benefit from previews has widened substantially. "It started with event movies but it's turned into something that's culturally very important," she says.
But for now, studios are finding previews result in a long good Friday indeed at the box office.” /> Probably not, since business during the school and work day would be limited. Since Friday opening days now start on Thursday evenings, will opening night eventually turn into opening afternoon?
"The original ethos behind the midnight showings was for those specially selected potential blockbusters, not every wide release film," recalls Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst with comScore.
and 8 p.m., albeit at fewer theaters than on official opening Fridays. But more recently, studios began shifting Thursday previews back to 10 p.m. Thursday preview grosses are folded into Friday totals. Midnight screenings used to be reserved for the biggest titles — think "Star Wars" level. and then to the now-standard 7 p.m.
Goldstein agrees that Thursday nights have become more important at a time when competition for moviegoers attention is growing exponentially.
"It's not foolproof, but the Thursday numbers do give you an early glimpse of the demographics that it's going to attract and whether you executed your marketing," Aronson says.
Four weeks later, "The Meg" has already crossed $462 million worldwide and will likely end up in the black. The final number — $45.4 million — was double that forecast. Initial domestic numbers for "The Meg" showed that $4 million worth of tickets had been sold on Thursday night, portending an opening weekend far above the estimated $20 million to $22 million for the Friday to Sunday period.
"There are no extra costs to starting on Thursday night instead of Friday morning. But now, "Thursday night previews have become the norm," notes Lionsgate distribution president David Spitz. Exhibitors love the fact that the studios are doing it because it drives traffic on what would normally be an off night."
The strong Thursday showing for "The Meg" is proof of the impact early preview showings have become over the past six years. Ever-earlier showings ahead of the once-traditional Friday release get the buzz out faster and give box office watchers a snapshot of what to expect over the opening weekend.
in July 2012, when James Eagan Holmes opened fire during the midnight premiere, killing 12 people and injuring 70 others. There's several advantages to starting showtimes well before midnight, but the shift was precipitated by  "The Dark Knight Rises" shooting in Aurora, Colo.
It's still an inexact science, according to Dergarabedian. How accurate is Thursday night in terms of predicting the weekend?
"You ensure that people can see the movie on Thursday instead of being shut out Friday.” "When you have a movie with strong playability, starting on Thursday night can generate a lot of positive momentum," he said.