Goya Awards: Antonio Banderas-Hosted Ceremony Prizes ‘Schoolgirls’ as Best Picture

SUPPORTING ACTOR
“The Father,” (Florian Zeller, U.K., France)
ANIMATED SHORT FILM
ORIGINAL SONG
ACTRESS
DOCUMENTARY
Daniela Cajías (“Schoolgirls”)
Three events caught the perfectly pitched tone of the kudos-cast. Bayona and Alejandro Amenábar – appeared on stage to give awards – but not the biggest plaudits but statues for humbler craft and technical achievement: Costume design, hair and make-up, sound, VFX and line production. In the first awards tandem of the night, many of Spanish cinema’s biggest names – Pedro Almódovar, Penélope Cruz, Paz Vega, J.A.
2021 35th GOYA AWARDS
For the first time ever at the Goyas, the real stars of the show, however, were not its presenters but its prize winners who watched on from a spectacular video screen of individual Zoom-like connections. This yielded moments of surprising intimacy and high comedy as winners accepted their Goyas from their own homes, applauded, kissed or mobbed by on-screen families or crews in camera-rocking, unbridled jubilation. Never before has a Goya ceremony underscored the importance of its awards for its winners.
2021’s Honorary Goya went to Angela Molina, star of Luis Buñuel’s last film, “The Obscure Object of Desire,” and Jaime Chavarri's "Las cosas del querer," and star of some of Manuel Gutiérrez Aragón's greatest films, such as "Heart of the Forest."
NEW ACTOR
CINEMATOGRAPHY
“A la cara,” (Javier Marco)
EDITING
In a hybrid on-site/virtual ceremony – with no audience nor nominees attending in person – the 35th Goya Awards were televised from the Teatro del Soho CaixaBank in Malaga, southern Spain.
Ana Parra, Luis Fernández Lago (“Adú”)
SPECIAL EFFECTS
Pilar Palomero’s “Schoolgirls” ("Las Niñas”), a coming-of-age story and generational portrait of Spanish women who would now be in their 40s, swept an extraordinary and admirable 35th edition of Spain’s Goya Awards on Saturday, scooping best picture, new director, original screenplay and cinematography.
MAKEUP AND HAIR DESIGN
Beata Wotjowicz, Ricardo Molina (“Akelarre”)
Angela Molina
ANIMATED FEATURE
Women won out almost as much as men, taking 12 categories to men’s 13, with three prizes shared. Premiering at the 2020’s Berlinale’s Generation Kplus, “The Girls” is a banner title of a new – and often women-driven – Catalan cinema. “The Girls’” Daniela Cajías became the first woman DP to win a best cinematography Goya. 41% of nominees were women, Spanish Academy president Mariano Barroso said on stage.
A feminist sensibility also threaded some acceptance speeches and choice of performing artists. “When they're stripped naked, woman are stripped of rights,” said Mabel Lozano, accepting a Goya for documentary short, “Biografía del cadáver de una mujer.” Trap singer-songwriter Nathy Peluso appeared on stage to sing and very well – a classic operetta lyric “Las Peluqueras,”
And the winners are:
SOUND
“Biography of a Woman's Corpse,” (Mabel Lozano)
Mariano García Marty, Ana Rubio, (“Akelarre”)” />
Among celebrities sending pre-recorded messages of support to the Awards were Robert DeNiro, Al Pacino, Dustin Hoffman, Helen Mirren, Charlize Theron, Isabelle Huppert, Monica Bellucci, Salma Hayek, Sylvester Stallone, Benicio del Toro, Emma Thompson, Ricardo Darín and Laura Dern.
“Blue & Malone: Casos imposibles,” (Abraham López Guerrero)
David Pérez Sañudo, Marina Parés Pulido (“Ane”)
Hailed as one of the most important Spanish films made this century, Luis López Carrasco’s “The Year of the Discovery,” a searing account of industrial reconversion in 1992, which anticipated Spain’s recessions from the 2008 financial crisis, won best documentary in the strongest nominee lineup in years.
Aránzazu Calleja, Maite Arroitajauregi (“Akelarre”)
“Forgotten We’ll Be,” (Fernando Trueba, Colombia)
Salvador Calvo won best director for the three-part, Africa-set drama “Adú,” a Netflix pick-up produced by Telecinco Cinema, Ikiru Films and La Terraza Films that proved one of Spain’s biggest box office hits of last year, earning €6.3 million ($7.6 million) at the Spanish box office, promoted to the hilt by Telecinco Cinema parent Mediaset España.
“Que no, que no,” (María Rozalén for “Rosa's Wedding”)
HONORARY GOYA
Mario Casas, (“No matarás”)
ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Nathalie Poza (“Rosa's Wedding”)
Emiliano Granada and Jamie Lang contributed to this article.
“Schoolgirls,” (Pilar Palomero)
“The Year of the Discovery,” (Luis López Carrasco)
Nerea Torrijos, (“Akelarre”)
Pilar Palomero (“Schoolgirls”)
“Anybody who’s seen not just the nominees for animated short but the shortlist of titles will realize the immense potential of Spanish animation,” said Abraham López Guerrero, a winner for animated/live action “Blue & Malone: Casos Imposibles.” Represented by short extracts, the other best short nominees bore him out. Won in the best feature category by “Turu, the Wacky Hen,” directed by Eduardo Gondell, Víctor Monigote, animation also shone at the Goyas.
FILM
COSTUME DESIGN
Marking a milestone in his transition from Spanish heartthrob to character actor, Mario Casas won best actor for “No Matarás.” Patricia López Arnaíz (“While at War,” “The Plague”) took best actress for her role in “Ane is Missing,” a confident mother-daughter relationship drama-thriller melding psychological observation and social critique, set against the background of high-speed train construction in a 2009 Bilbao.
ART DIRECTION
Mikel Serrano (“Akelarre”)
Jone Laspiur, (“Ane”)
DOCUMENTARY SHORT
“Turu, the Wacky Hen,” (Eduardo Gondell, Víctor Monigote)
Patricia López Arnaiz, (“Ane”)
Mid-ceremony, M.C. Earlier, he called on his sector to use lockdown to reflect on how cinema can serve its society. Antonio Banderas, a Malaga native, recalled saying goodbye to his driver and technicians when “Official Competition” was closed down when COVID-19 hit Spain last March and thinking that these people – who will bear the brunt of shoot stoppage – and with whom he had coincided on shoots down the years- were family.
Marking further awards, Colombia’s submission to the International Feature Film Oscar, Fernando Trueba’s “Memories of My Father,” a portrait of Colombian public health system pioneer Hector Abad Gomez as well as a father-son relationship drama, won out in a strong contest for best Ibero-American feature Goya.
ACTOR
Adam Nourou, (“Adú”)
Alberto San Juan, (“Sentimental”)
ORIGINAL MUSIC
Gender issues feature strongly in two of the best picture nominees – “Schoolgirls” and Iciar Bollaín's “Rosa’s Wedding” – as well as the movie that won most awards, Pablo Agüero’s “Aquelarre,” a feminist take on Inquisition witch trials in the 1609 Basque Country.
EUROPEAN PICTURE
Sergio Jiménez, (“The Year of the Discovery”)
IBERO-AMERICAN FILM
Pilar Palomero, (“Schoolgirls”)
NEW ACTRESS
SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Eduardo Esquide, Jamaica Ruíz García, Juan Ferro, Nicolas de Poulpiquet (“Adú”)
The night’s big best picture award, by contrast, was presented by nurse Ana Ruiz López, who had organized an impromptu hospital in a hanger last March and organized a hospital entertainment service for the ill during the pandemic.
DIRECTOR
Salvador Calvo, (“Adú”)
ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
NEW DIRECTOR
PRODUCTION DESIGN
LIVE-ACTION SHORT FILM

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