I’m thrilled to be joining the company and look forward to collaborating with the many talented teams across the organization as we continue to connect these iconic entertainment properties to the many communities of engaged fans around the world." Messinger commented, “I have a profound admiration for Activision Blizzard’s track record of developing enduring entertainment franchises.
Before joining Activision Blizzard, Messinger was briefly CEO of Verum Ventus, a strategic consulting company for C-level execs, which he joined in October 2018. Earlier in his career, Messinger led consumer marketing for Ticketmaster and held various roles at the Walt Disney Co. Prior to that, he spent more than 15 years at CAA, most recently as the co-head of marketing for the sports and entertainment agency. and marketing agency Leo Burnett Worldwide. He holds a bachelor's degree in English and a certificate in film and video from Duke University.
Activision Blizzard tapped David Messinger, a former 15-plus-year veteran of CAA, as its first corporate-wide chief marketing officer.
Messinger's "tenure in global entertainment and his expertise in strategic, award-winning marketing campaigns will help our communities to grow and further inspire our players to connect, compete and play,” Johnson said in a statement.
Activision Blizzard's titles include Activision's "Call of Duty" and "Spyro"; Blizzard Entertainment's "World of Warcraft," "Overwatch," "Hearthstone," "Diablo," "StarCraft," and "Heroes of the Storm"; and King's "Candy Crush."
For the quarter ended June 30, Activision Blizzard reported $1.40 billion in revenue, down 15% from $1.64 billion during the same quarter a year ago. The company attributed much of the user decline to its split with “Destiny” developer Bungie, which was announced earlier this year.” /> The company had 327 million monthly active users across all titles in Q2 — down 7% from 352 million in the year-earlier period.
In a separate management change, on Aug. 14, Brian Stolz shifted from serving as chief people officer (head of human resources) of Activision Blizzard to serving as a special adviser to CEO Bobby Kotick. Claudine Naughton, formerly AIG's chief human resources officer, has joined the company as chief people officer.
Messinger, based in Santa Monica, reports to Coddy Johnson, Activision Blizzard's president and COO. It's the first time the video-game company has appointed a CMO who will oversee the global marketing operations across all of Activision Blizzard brands.

Across its franchises, the company had some 327 million monthly active users. That's down from 352 million in Q2 of 2018, despite the fact that "Candy Crush," the company's most popular mobile game, grew its number of players year-over year. Executives attributed much of the user decline to the company's split with "Destiny" developer Bungie, which was announced earlier this year.
Adjusted earnings per share for the quarter were $0.43, compared to $0.52 a year ago. During the quarter ending June 30, Activision generated revenue of $1.4 billion, compared to $1.64 billion during the same quarter a year ago.
Developing.” />
Analysts had expected earnings of $0.26 per share on revenue of $1.19 billion.
Investors weren't entirely happy about that trend, and sent Activision Blizzard’s share price down as much as 3% in after-hours trading. But while the results were considerably better than the company’s previous outlook for the quarter, they were still down significantly from last year’s Q2 results.
On Thursday, executives said that they were growing the teams for core titles like "Call of Duty," "Candy Crush," "World of Warcraft," "Overwatch" and "Diablo." Also earlier this year, Activision Blizzard announced the layoff of around 775 people, or around 8% of the company's total workforce.
Down may not be the new up after all: Activision Blizzard celebrated its Q2 2019 earnings as a success story Thursday, with CEO Bobby Kotick saying: “Our second quarter results exceeded our prior outlook for both revenue and earnings per share.”

Activision will be instead investing more in live services, Battle.net, eSports, and advertising efforts. CEO Bobby Kotick said that the cuts would come from support staff while the company consolidates its commercial operations and reorganizes its marketing initiatives. At the time, the company called the move a de-prioritizing of initiatives that didn’t meet expectations.
King's user count was up for the second quarter in a row, thanks to the success of "Candy Crush Friends Saga," according to the company. In reporting its earnings Thursday, Activision Blizzard pointed out that the company had 345 million monthly active users across the quarter, a bulk of which — 272 million — came from King.
Three months after announcing mass layoffs at the company, Activision Blizzard CEO Bobby Kotick said Thursday that the company outperformed its outlook, making progress against that plan, and declared a cash dividend for common shareholders.
The company also noted that "Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice" sold more than two million copies in less than 10 days and that the second season of the Overwatch League started in February to sell-out crowds at the Blizzard Arena. Viewership hours for the second season to date are over 30% higher than in the first season, according to the company.” />
Activision announced on Thursday that it has sold the first five Call of Duty teams in Atlanta, Dallas, New York, Paris and Toronto to owners who “recognize the scale of the opportunity from their partnerships with us on the ‘Overwatch League.’”
The plan outlined in February included laying off about 775 people — 8% of its 9,600-person staff — as it refocused its efforts on its Call of Duty, Candy Crush, Overwatch, Warcraft, Hearthstone and Diablo franchises.
Currently, the company remains focused on delivering in the near-term.
In Thursday’s earnings report, Kotick noted that the company is continuing to “enhance our leadership position in esports.” He pointed to strong growth in Overwatch League viewership and “enthusiastic demand for our professional, city-based Call of Duty league franchises.”
Net revenue for the quarter was $1.83 billion, down from $1.97 billion for the same period last year, the company reported in its first-quarter earnings report. The Board of Directors also declared a cash dividend of $0.37 per common share, payable on May 9, 2019 to shareholders on March 28, 2019, up 9% from 2018.
While Activision Blizzard is moving forward with its plan to invest in increased development on their internally-owned franchise, as well as investing in platform expansion on PC and mobile and new geographies, that is all meant to “bear fruit in the future.”
The company added it would be increasing development resources by 20 percent in 2019 on those franchises it is now focusing on. “The company will fund this greater investment by de-prioritizing initiatives that are not meeting expectations and reducing certain non-development and administrative-related costs across the business,” the publisher said in its earnings release.”

The randomized nature of the contents encourages players to keep buying— which some consider a compulsion similar to gambling as players aim to get better rewards. Players can purchase loot boxes using in-game or real-world currency. Much like the Netherlands, Belgium is cracking down on what it perceives as game industry giants blurring the line between gaming and gambling. Loot boxes are just one of many methods of monetizing video games in recent years.
"Both in the purchase of loot boxes and in the entire operation of the game, all of this can lead to pure manipulation of individuals or groups of players," according to the BGC’s report.
The BGC also suggested that players should have access to the odds of winning, and the commission itself have access to the random number generators used in the loot box mechanics to determine the value of the rewards. In order to avoid manipulative practices, the BGC has recommended player-spending limits as well as age verification methods to avoid targeting children, who could be the most susceptible to the compulsion to keep purchasing loot boxes. The BGC also suggests that there should be clear indication, before purchase, that the titles contain gambling.
The current nature of loot boxes available in popular titles, including “Overwatch” and “FIFA 18,” border close to the BGC’s definition of gambling: a game in which a cost from the player can lead to loss or win for at least one person, and where chance plays a role in the progression of the game, the winner, or worth of the winnings.
Minister of Justice Koen Geens intends to open a dialogue between the BGC, the developers, and distributors before moving forward with any potential prosecution.” />
With the recent release of the Belgian Gaming Commission’s (BGC) research on video game loot boxes comes the clear definition of what is considered gambling and what’s fair game under Belgium law. Top offenders accused of violating these standards (EA, Valve, Activision Blizzard) may soon face criminal prosecution