The movie is set in 1927 with the King and Queen of England stopping by Downton Abbey for a royal visit. Imelda Staunton, Geraldine James, Simon Jones, David Haig, Tuppence Middleton, Kate Phillips, and Stephen Campbell Moore have joined the cast. The original cast members, including Michelle Dockery, Elizabeth McGovern, Maggie Smith, and Hugh Bonneville, are returning for the movie, which is distributed by Focus Features.
"Ad Astra" is debuting at 3,460 venues domestically. James Gray directed “Ad Astra” for Fox from a script he co-wrote with Ethan Gross. Pitt is playing a man who journeys across the solar system in search of his missing father, a dangerous renegade scientist (portrayed by Tommy Lee Jones).
The launch of Brad Pitt's space drama "Ad Astra" will land in second with about $20 million, while Sylvester Stallone's action-thriller "Rambo: Last Blood" will reel in around $18 million. STX's second frame of "Hustlers" should finish fourth with about $16 million and Warner Bros.' third weekend of "It: Chapter Two" will follow in fifth with about $14 million to hit $176 million in its first 17 days.
Julian Fellowes, who created the series and wrote the film's screenplay, is producing alongside Gareth Neame and Liz Trubridge. If estimates hold, "Downton Abbey" will set an opening weekend record for Focus, easily topping the 2015 mark of $22 million set by "Insidious Chapter 3." Neame produced the series and film through his Carnival Films banner.
Year-to-date box office remains far behind 2018 with $8.17 billion as of Sept. 19, down 5.9%, according to Comscore.” />
Of the three new films, "Downton Abbey" is faring the best, easily out-performing pre-release forecasts — which had been in the $20 million range for each of the trio. The ITV series that aired in the U.S. as part of PBS' Masterpiece Classics followed the lives of the Earl of Grantham and his family as well as the servants who work for them at the large manor house at the turn of the 20th century and won 16 Emmys during its six-season run from 2010 to 2015.
The feature film version of "Downton Abbey" is heading for an impressive $30 million opening weekend at 3,079 sites for an easy victory at the North American box office, early estimates showed Friday.
"Rambo: Last Blood" is hitting 3,618 locations, 37 years after the series launched with "First Blood." The story centers on Stallone's Rambo crossing into Mexico and taking on a violent cartel when the daughter of one of his friends is kidnapped. "Rambo: Last Blood" also stars Paz Vega, Sergio Peris-Mencheta and Yvette Monreal.
Reviews for "Rambo: Last Blood" have generated a mediocre 34% score on Rotten Tomatoes. The four Rambo films have grossed a combined $728 million in worldwide box office, led by "Rambo: First Blood Part II" with $300 million.
Gray began shooting the movie, which carries an $80 million budget, in 2017. Ruth Negga, Jamie Kennedy, and Donald Sutherland also star in “Ad Astra," which premiered at the Venice Film Festival. Fox had planned to open the title on May 24 but Disney shifted "Ad Astra" to the fall after buying Fox's movie assets.

Liv Tyler has been cast as the lead opposite Rob Lowe in Fox's "9-1-1" spinoff, Variety has confirmed.
The new entry to the budding franchise follows a sophisticated New York fireman (Lowe) who, along with his son, re-locates to Austin, Texas, and must try to balance saving those who are at their most vulnerable with solving the problems in his own life.
Tyler will play Chief Paramedic Michelle Blake, who is described as brilliant, wry, and the only one who can match wits with Lowe's character Owen in the station. Michelle has an obsession she struggles to control: finding out what happened to her little sister Iris, who disappeared two years ago.
Murphy, Falchuk, and Minear are creators and executive producers on the series. “9-1-1: Lone Star” is produced by 20th Century Fox Television in association with Ryan Murphy Television and Brad Falchuk Teley-Vision. Lowe will serve as a co-executive producer.
Deadline was first to report Tyler's casting.” />
20. The actress is best known for playing Arwen in the "Lord of the Rings" film trilogy. Television-wise, she is known for her roles on Hulu's "Harlots" and the HBO series "The Leftovers." She will next be seen playing the wife of Brad Pitt's character in sci-fi pic "Ad Astra," which hits theaters Sept.
Sources say Lowe stands to make more than $200,000 per episode for his role on "9-1-1: Lone Star," which is slated to premiere during the 2019-2020 season. The series hails from “9-1-1” co-creators Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk and Tim Minear.

Pitt is also producing with Plan B partners Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner and RT Features’ Rodrigo Teixeira, Keep Your Head Productions’ Anthony Katagas, and Gray.
Gray began shooting the movie in 2017 and said the film would resemble Joseph Conrad’s “Heart of Darkness.” Gray’s directing credits include "The Lost City of Z," “Little Odessa,” “We Own the Night,” “Two Lovers” and “The Immigrant.” The news was first reported by IndieWire.” />
James Gray directed “Ad Astra” from a script he co-wrote with Ethan Gross. Regency Enterprises and Fox produced in association with Bona Film Investment Company, which will distribute in China.
Disney distribution head Cathleen Taff told exhibitors last month at the CinemaCon convention that the studio would be moving around distribution dates on some of its titles. The studio had no comment Thursday.
Tommy Lee Jones, Ruth Negga, Jamie Kennedy, and Donald Sutherland are also starring in “Ad Astra.” Pitt is playing a man who journeys across the solar system in search of his missing father, a dangerous renegade scientist. Jones is portraying the father.
Brad Pitt’s science-fiction adventure movie “Ad Astra” has quietly vanished from the release schedule, three weeks prior to its previously announced May 24 opening date.
Pitt is expected to be at the Cannes Film Festival for the premiere of Quentin Tarantino's "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood," in which he co-stars with Leonardo DiCaprio. The screening will likely be on May 21, the 20th anniversary of "Pulp Fiction."
11, 2019, then decided in late 2018 to move it back four months to the Memorial Day weekend on May 24. Disney closed the deal for the 20th Century Fox film assets in March and has not done any promotion for the movie since then — no trailer or stills have been released. Fox had originally dated "Ad Astra" for Jan. "Ad Astra" was not included in early tracking numbers released Thursday for the Memorial Day period, expected to be dominated by Disney's live-action "Aladdin."

The story is set in 1969 and deals with impact of the murders by the Manson Family. Fox will receive a $17.1 million credit for "Call of the Wild." Tarantino's film, which has been set up at Sony, will received an $18 million tax credit after it completes production.
In addition to the two big-budget films, other notable projects include "Destroyer" directed by Karyn Kusama and starring Nicole Kidman, and an untitled Dan Gilroy project starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Rene Russo. A total of 54 projects (37 independent, 17 non-independent) applied for credits during the Oct. The tax credit allocation announced Monday reserves $62.8 million in credits for 11 films (four independent, seven non-independent). 16-20 application period.
They join other recently announced big-budget projects for California including "Captain Marvel," "Island Plaza," "Midway," "Ad Astra," "Bumblebee," and "Wrinkle in Time." Both titles will be shot in-state.
Notable examples include "San Andreas" (Australia), "Godzilla" (Vancouver), "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" (Vancouver and Louisiana), "Battle: Los Angeles" (Louisiana), and "Million Dollar Arm" (Georgia). Lemisch noted that in years past, several films set in California were shot in other locales where tax credits are more generous.
"Despite aggressive incentives worldwide, California is once again competing for big projects because we’re able to provide the best overall value," said California Film Commission executive director Amy Lemisch. "Films today can be shot just about anywhere, so it’s great to see so much production returning to the Golden State."
The commission said the 11 film projects are on track to employ nearly 2,500 cast and crew, and generate more than $320 million in qualified spending (defined as wages to below-the-line workers and payments for equipment/vendors).” />
The California Film Commission has selected two big-budget films – "Call of the Wild" and Quentin Tarantino’s "Untitled #9" — as recipients of the state's production tax credit.
Tarantino's film, which was nabbed by Sony, is getting an $18 million credit. Fox's "Call of the Wild" is getting a $17 million credit.
The 2015-16 fiscal year marked a major expansion for the seven-year-old tax credit program, aimed at halting the erosion of California-based production to states with bigger incentives, such as Georgia and New York. The annual allocation rose from $100 million to $330 million, and applications are ranked on how many jobs they will produce, rather than being selected by lottery.
The program expansion, enacted in 2014 by California lawmakers, covers five years and $1.65 billion in tax credits. The credit is set at 20%, but producers are eligible for an additional 5% "uplift" if they shoot outside the L.A. zone, commit to music scoring or music track recording in the state, or to do visual effects in California.
The commission noted Monday that such projects would have been ineligible for tax credits under the state’s first-generation Program 1.0, which was closed to films with budgets exceeding $75 million.
There's a reason this place was the movie capital of the world for so many decades. "Everyone associated with our film is deeply thankful for the tax credit," said Gilroy. Getting the tax credit is great for us and the production community that calls L.A. "In California, we can draw on an unparalleled variety of locations and a deep pool of talent stretching back generations. home."