House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy supported Trump's move, "Why would she want to go overseas with the government shutdown, with people missing their paychecks?"
The trip did not include a stop in Egypt, he said.
Her spokesman, Drew Hammill, said that the Afghanistan trip included a pilot rest stop in Brussels, where the congressional delegation was to meet "top NATO commanders, U.S. military leaders and key allies – to affirm the United States’ ironclad commitment to the NATO alliance."
WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump informed House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that he was canceling an overseas trip she planned to take aboard a government aircraft this weekend, responding to a letter in which she suggested that they postpone the State of Union address until the shutdown ends.
Zeldin.” “The purpose of the trip was to express appreciation and thanks to our men and women in uniform for their service and dedication, and to obtain critical national security and intelligence briefings from those on the front lines,” he said. “The President traveled to Iraq during the Trump Shutdown as did a Republican [congressional delegation] led by Rep.
"In light of the 800,000 great American workers not receiving pay, I am sure you would agree that postponing this public relations event is totally appropriate." "We will reschedule this seven-day excursion when the Shutdown is over," Trump wrote in his letter.
President Trump denying Speaker Pelosi military travel to visit our troops in Afghanistan, our allies in Egypt and NATO is also inappropriate. "One sophomoric response does not deserve another," Graham said on Twitter. "Speaker Pelosi's threat to cancel the State of the Union is very irresponsible and blatantly politics.
Pelosi was set to travel to Brussels, Egypt, and Afghanistan, according to Trump's letter, and reportedly planned to leave on Thursday.
Lindsey Graham (R-S.C) also was critical of Trump — as well as Pelosi. Sen.
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He said Pelosi could still fly commercial, but "that would certainly be your prerogative."
Speaking to reporters, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) called Trump's action "petty. It's vindictive." Trump's cancellation of Pelosi's trip was the latest sign that the clash between the White House and congressional Democrats has only grown more caustic. It's small.
Pelosi's overseas trip had not yet been publicly disclosed, apparently as a security precaution.
Trump waited more than 24 hours to respond to her letter.
A number of news outlets reported that the trip was still planned. Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin is planning to bring a delegation to Davos, Switzerland this month for the World Economic Forum.
The House recessed on Thursday afternoon, and won't return until Tuesday. The shutdown is now in its 27th day. There is currently no visible sign that the impasse is anywhere near its end.
The trip also was to include other members of Congress, and an Air Force bus was even parked outside the House side of the Capitol, apparently to take them to the military plane.
In a press conference earlier on Thursday, she said Jan. 29 was "not a sacred date," nor was it constitutionally required. But she cited security concerns and the fact that so many security personnel are going without pay. 29, be rescheduled until after the shutdown is over. Pelosi wrote a letter to Trump on Wednesday in which she suggested that the State of the Union address, set for Jan.


"I am glad the Speaker wants to meet our troops and hear from our commanders and allies. I am very disappointed she’s playing politics with the State of the Union. I wish our political leadership could find the same desire to work for common goals as those who serve our nation in uniform and other capacities."

You're there, you're by yourself, and you're thrust into surviving. "That's kind of what it's like any time you start an acting job. "The two characters are very independent people and very lonely people," Madden says. So I suppose we kind of did that together."
In this week’s episode, "Bodyguard" star Richard Madden sits down with Variety's features editor of TV, Danielle Turchiano, to talk about playing a former soldier with PTSD, who is tasked with protecting Britain's Home Secretary.
There, not only is he protecting the Right Honourable Julia Montague (Keeley Hawes) from the multiple attempts on her life, but he is helping himself, as well. Having the training of a soldier, though, David puts his task and duty first.
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Madden shares that he was most interested in bringing to life the daily struggle of someone in that position — the anxiety and depression that comes with the disorder.
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Welcome to “Remote Controlled,” a podcast from Variety featuring the best and brightest in television, both in front of and behind the camera.
"The character [is] in denial of his PTSD and trying to hold it back from everyone around him, particularly his loved ones," he explains. "But we get to see the effect that it's obviously had on his life and his marriage. … This is the big thing he avoids."
Madden admits that there were often moments where he would get the scripts and not see some of the twists of the show coming. One example was the budding personal relationship between David and Julia but, he adds, building the necessary chemistry came naturally.
"That does happen sometimes for people with PTSD — they have flashbacks like that — but that's not the only thing that happens." "In a lot of movies and television we see PTSD as someone closes a door too loud or a car backfires and our subject suddenly is transported back to Afghanistan in the middle of this fighting and men are dying," Madden says.
"He…blames her for the fact that his feet were on the ground in Afghanistan and Iraq," he admits. Madden's role was extra complicated by the fact that his character, David Budd, doesn't align politically with the beliefs and votes of the woman he is hired to protect.
"He's got this thing, it's kind of like the knight in shining armor syndrome of wanting to be this hero and this good guy," he says. "If she's intact then he'll be intact."
Richard Madden photographed exclusively for the Variety Remote Controlled Podcast

The United States’ involvement in the Middle East in the 1980s and its effects going into the 21st century is a complex and confusing topic for any screenwriter to tackle. However, Mike Nichols’ “Charlie Wilson’s War” manages to not only capture the Reagan-era policies in a way anyone can understand, but somehow succeeds in making it funny at the same time. Featuring a seasoned cast that includes Hanks, Julia Roberts, and Philip Seymour Hoffman and Aaron Sorkin’s tight dialogue, “Charlie Wilson’s War” captures how the American government armed the mujahideen groups in Afghanistan to fight off the Russian occupation. — EC
Roosevelt’s life and the complex web of mistresses he spun, especially with his distant cousin Margaret “Daisy” Suckley, played by Laura Linney. This British comedy features Bill Murray portraying the final years of Franklin D. — EC The film also riffs on King George VI’s anxiety about eating a hot dog in public, which is far funnier than it sounds.
— Christi Carras The comical 1990s classic tells the story of the female athletes who took over Major League Baseball while men were away at war, featuring a ragtag ensemble cast of influential women, from Rosie O’Donnell to Madonna. “There’s no crying in baseball!” What’s more American than a World War II dramedy about baseball starring Tom Hanks and Geena Davis?
But “Remember the Titans” is about much more than a high school football drama, telling the true story of complex race relations in the years after the Civil Rights Movement between its star athletes who slowly begin to change the divided minds of their town through teamwork and compassion. Washington takes on the role of real-life coach Herman Boone, with Will Patton, Wood Harris, and Ryan Hurst in the supporting cast. On the surface, the Denzel Washington-starrer may seem like just another underdog sports success story. — CC
The Vietnam War: "Good Morning Vietnam"
The series, which was adapted from Robert Altman’s hit 1970 film, followed Benjamin Franklin “Hawkeye” Pierce (played by Alan Alda) and his tag team of doctors, nurses, and support staff as they endeavored to remedy their boredom in between “meatball surgeries” while stationed at the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Uijeongbu, South Korea, during the Korean War. — Tara Bitran Newly streaming on Hulu, the acclaimed sitcom that ran from 1972 until 1983 was nominated for 100 Emmy Awards during its 11-season run, winning 14.
Henson, and Janelle Monae, who bring power and humor as pioneers for both NASA and the Civil Rights Movement. — CC The cast — almost as star-studded as space — includes Octavia Spencer, Taraji P. The 2017 historical hit about three African American women who played integral roles in sending American astronauts into space during the Cold War snuck up on the 2017 Oscar race, ultimately landing three nominations.
Founding Fathers: "Drunk History"
Pre-World War II: "Hyde Park on Hudson"
The Cold War: "Hidden Figures"
— EC Army’s investigations and attempts to exploit paranormal phenomena for military advantage. Acting as a fictionalized parody of Jon Ronson’s non-fiction book, “The Men Who Stare at Goats” focuses on the U.S. Satirizing the oddball research projects the military conducted, the movie’s all-star cast includes George Clooney, Jeff Bridges, Ewan McGregor, and Kevin Spacey.
World War II: "A League of Their Own"
Season 2, Episode 8: Thomas Jefferson and John Adams Had Beef
The Reagan Doctrine: "Charlie Wilson's War"
history in no time. If you're looking to take a break from high temps or stay home and cocoon with your fireworks-fearing pup, you can celebrate the nation's independence, be entertained, and maybe even learn something at the same time. Check out these 10 movies and shows streaming now that will have you mastering U.S.
The Korean War: "M*A*S*H"
1970s: "Remember the Titans"
Just don’t try to convince your friends it actually happened. This revisionist comedy features Michelle Williams and Kirsten Dunst as Betsy and Arlene, the true whistleblowers behind the Watergate scandal. Then check out “Dick,” a 1999 comedy revolving around two harebrained teenagers who fumble their way into influencing the Vietnam War peace proceedings by giving Richard “Tricky Dick” Nixon pot cookies and accidentally uncovering the Watergate conspiracy. — EC Doesn’t sound like the Deep Throat from the history books? Never heard of them?
Operation Enduring Freedom: "Whiskey Tango Foxtrot"
— EC Featuring a screenplay by a former “M*A*S*H” writer and fully improvised radio broadcast bits, “Good Morning Vietnam” received high praise from critics when it premiered, earning Williams a Golden Globe for best actor in a musical or comedy film for his performance. The late Robin Williams stars as Adrian Cronauer in “Good Morning Vietnam,” a comedy about a radio DJ’s attempts to turn the Armed Forces Radio Service into a station where Vietnam War G.I.s can find solace.
“Whiskey Tango Foxtrot” stands for WTF in the NATO alphabet code, and highlights the comedic tone for the film, which sets Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan in its sights. — EC” /> Starring Tina Fey, Margot Robbie, and Martin Freeman, the movie follows war correspondent Kim Baker as she documents the disillusioned American combatants and works to overcome her disadvantage as a woman working in Islamic society.
The Iraq War: "The Men Who Stare at Goats"
Watergate: "Dick"
By far one of the best segments happens during the second episode of Season 2, where Patrick Walsh struggles and slurs his way through the story of how lifelong friends and founding fathers Thomas Jefferson and John Adams became bitter enemies over the course of the 1800 presidential election. The premise behind “Drunk History” is simple: What if your history teacher preached the most interesting aspects of history, but did it after finishing off too many IPAs before class started? — Ellis Clopton In only the way “Drunk History” can, the show hilariously shows how the campaign devolved into a schoolyard war of words, with the two men (who would both end up on U.S. currency) calling each other names and telling crowds lies about their devious sexual desires.

Jon Alpert
“The pot has been boiling for a long time, so to speak,” says Alpert. I felt that it was an important mission, and we were really lucky that Netflix gave us the resources to not only do the editing but a lot of restoring as well. “We knew we wanted to make this film. The early footage had started to deteriorate technically, and we needed to resuscitate it.”
"This documentary is basically a museum of the entire evolution of electronic image-gathering.”
“When we first went down there with the first generation of black-and-white camcorders, we were placed under boat arrest and were only allowed on shore for about three hours after I nonstop complained and drove the people who were guarding us crazy.”
Alpert knew that to sell his footage he would need to shoot in color, as the networks were starting to reject black and white. “It was serial No. On his second trip in 1974 he brought along the first JVC color Portapak in the world. “My wife’s brother had picked it up off the assembly line in Japan and sent it to us,” he says. 1.”
We were pushing after him with this camera in a baby carriage, and it was his curiosity that led him to come over [to us].” Subsequently, Alpert used a Sony color Portapak system that was so heavy he carted it around Cuba in a baby carriage. “He looked at us like we’d landed from Mars. “That’s what attracted Fidel’s attention,” he remembers.
Alpert, the pioneering journalist and filmmaker, has through the years reported from places like Vietnam, Cambodia, Iran, China and Afghanistan and has made films for broadcast networks PBS and HBO.
“This documentary is basically a museum of the entire evolution of electronic image-gathering,” says Alpert.
He began in 1972 with an early Sony half-inch reel-to-reel black-and-white video recorder. Two years later he traveled with a color JVC machine. The following year it was a more advanced Sony U-Matic three-quarter-inch videocassette unit. To document Cuba, Alpert used 15 types of cameras and nearly as many editing systems.
Participants in the personal video revolution of the 1970s will be thrilled as they watch the credits roll at the end of Jon Alpert’s documentary “Cuba and the Cameraman,” which debuts on Netflix and in theaters on Nov. 24.
His latest project for Netflix encapsulates his travels to Cuba over five decades, during which he shot life on the island under Fidel Castro. He used portable technology that was in its infancy when he began and became more sophisticated over the years.
The Netflix show, which focuses on three Cuban families and their growth and struggles and screened at the Venice Film Festival, provides an intimate look at the country and its people through the eyes of evolving cameras.” /> That was the beginning of a relationship that developed over the next 40 years between the Cuban leader and the documentarian.
As time went by, he progressively used Betacam, Video8, Hi8, DVCam, MiniDV and XAVC, mostly sticking with Sony products.