Kavanaugh and 'Crazytown'
During the Nixon years, Treasury Secretary George Shultz refused to act on the president's behalf to politicize the IRS, and members of the Office of Management and Budget declined to cut funding to universities because they were led by opponents of the Vietnam war. H.R. Haldeman, Nixon's chief of staff, wrote in his diaries of instances where Nixon ordered things "that Haldeman just didn't do."
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He said that his concern with the Trump White House now is that "you will have a purge."
Political strategist Mathew Littman and Emily Goodin of The Daily Mail talk about Washington's weird week, marked by hundreds arrested at the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation hearings, Alex Jones on Capitol Hill and, of course, the anonymous op ed.
On the latest edition of Variety's "PopPolitics" on SiriusXM, presidential historian Tim Naftali says that what the op-ed and Bob Woodward's soon-to-be-published book show is that "There are people in the government that are trying to signal to the rest of us, 'We know that Donald Trump is a threat to the republic. We are there not because we want to enable him, but we want to contain him.'"
"The problem for Nixon is that he and Haldeman shared a similar ethical world view and there were things Haldeman should have prevented and he didn't," said Naftali, who is an associate professor at New York University and the former director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.
"PopPolitics," hosted by Variety's Ted Johnson, airs from 2-3 p.m. It also is available on demand.” /> ET/11 a.m.-noon PT on SiriusXM's political channel POTUS.
"No one is advocating breaking the law, I am certainly not advocating it," he says "But there is an interesting moral debate going on whether people should stay in an administration they deeply disagree with, and if they feel that they are part of the line that will prevent that administration from engaging in unwise or unconstitutional acts," he says. "That is what this op ed raises. I am sure Americans will disagree on whether or not someone should stay in office, should stay in a government they so bitterly oppose."
WASHINGTON — The anonymous New York Times op-ed has few if any historic precedents: In real time, a senior administration official is sounding the alarm that the president is impetuous and irrational, and only those around him have restrained him from his worst impulses.
"There is certainly a precedent for public servants in a presidential administration working presidential actions that they in some way consider unconstitutional or in some way an abuse of power," Naftali says.
But there is historic precedent for subordinates ignoring or refusing presidential orders. The op-ed and Woodward's book suggest that there is a resistance within the administration working to restrain Trump's worst impulses, which manifests in the refusal of White House officials to carry out some of Trump's order and an anecdote in which Gary Cohn, who was Trump's chief economic adviser earlier this year, taking an order off Trump's desk that would have meant that the U.S. would exit from a trade deal with key ally South Korea.

"We take reports of hate content seriously and review any podcast episode or song that is flagged by our community," a spokeswoman said in an email. "Spotify can confirm it has removed specific episodes of ‘The Alex Jones Show’ podcast for violating our hate content policy." The company did not provide details about the alleged hate speech in the Jones podcasts that were removed, an action it took after many Spotify users complained about them.
Carter was strongly opposed to the "hateful conduct" policy, Variety has reported.” /> This Monday, Troy Carter, Spotify's global head of creator services, announced he will leave the company.
Jones and the Infowars' brand of fear-based rhetoric targeting immigrants, LGBT people, women and other groups have become a high-profile test case for what internet-content platforms will allow and what they will block. Jones — who has perpetuated such myths as asserting that the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School gun massacre was a hoax — has come under increasing scrutiny in recent weeks by big tech platforms.
In less than a month, the company reversed course on the "hateful conduct" policy and dropped it. In May, Spotify implemented a policy prohibiting "hate content" from the service. It also moved to ban to artists who have engaged in what Spotify deemed “hateful conduct” from promoted playlists, applying that to R&B artist R. Kelly and rappers XXXTentacion and Tay-K.
Spotify continues to offer dozens of episode of Jones' podcast on the service, dating back to at least June 2017.
The streaming service cited Jones' violations of its policy banning hate speech. Spotify has deleted several episodes of the podcast hosted by far-right agitator Alex Jones, the controversial founder of the Infowars conspiracy-theory site.
Both YouTube and Facebook removed four videos and temporarily suspended some of Jones' posting capabilities. Last week, Jones was penalized by both YouTube and Facebook for violating their community-standards guidelines.
News of Spotify's removal of the offending Jones podcast episodes was first posted by New York Times reporter Ben Sisario in a tweet Wednesday.