Henson has made $36 million in its first two weeks of release. Paramount's gender-bending remake, "What Men Want" came in fourth place, bringing in $10.8 million during its second outing. The comedy starring Taraji P.
The rest of February will make for tough comparisons since Marvel's more inclusive take on the superhero genre generated a massive $700 million in North America alone during its long run in multiplexes.” /> To nobody's surprise, ticket sales are down almost 60% from last year when "Black Panther" delivered a record-breaking $202 million debut.
"Alita: Battle Angel" just barely fended off Warner Bros.' "The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part." Last weekend's champ dropped to the No. All three titles are targeting younger audiences. The animated sequel based on the popular kids toys has hefty competition on the horizon. Next weekend sees the release of "How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World" and Disney's "Captain Marvel" not far behind. 2 spot, adding another $21.2 million for a domestic haul of $62.6 million.
Fox originally intended to drop the movie in December, where it would have competed with a lineup that included "Aquaman," "Mary Poppins Returns," and "Bumblebee." By doing so, "Alita" avoided getting steamrolled a la "Mortal Engines," Universal's sci-fi epic that flopped in spectacular fashion when it debuted right around that time. With that said, it looks like the studio made the right decision pushing back "Alita's" release date. In its first weekend, "Alita" has already passed the entire domestic haul of "Mortal Engines," the $100 million movie that stalled out with $15 million in North America.
Its $11.4 million bounty since opening on Wednesday is almost half of what tracking services estimated heading into the weekend. Universal and Blumhouse's slasher sequel launched in fifth place with $9.8 million over the weekend. Fellow new release "Happy Death Day 2U" didn't fare as well from the holiday. The good news, at least, is the movie only cost $9 million so it won't take much for "Happy Death Day 2U" to end up in the black. It's also a steep decline from the opening weekend of its predecessor, "Happy Death Day," which bowed with $26 million.
The Dwayne Johnson-produced WWE drama expands nationwide next weekend. It generated the best screen average of the weekend with $40,896 per location. On the indie front, MGM's "Fighting With My Family" brought in $131,625 over the three-day frame and is expected to make $163,584 through Monday.
Ticket sales are on pace to be the smallest bounty for the holiday frame in almost 20 years, since 2000's crop of movies brought back $133 million in receipts, according to Comscore. Tracking services estimate that this will be one of the lowest grossing President's Day weekends in years. Fox's sci-fi adventure "Alita: Battle Angel" dominated in North America, but its opening weekend win isn't leaving the box office with much to celebrate.
Unlike critics, audiences seem to be enjoying "Alita: Battle Angel." Moviegoers branded the blockbuster with a promising A- CinemaScore, suggesting that positive word of mouth could lead Rosa Salazar's cyborg heroine to a long life in theaters. Another promising sign?
The movie will now bank on international markets to get "Alita" out of the red. 22. "Alita" certainly didn't set any new President's Day weekend records, but it did benefit from its new release date that saw most kids out of school over the holiday. The movie is resonating overseas, where it pulled in $56 million this weekend when it opened in most major foreign markets. That takes its international bounty to $94 million. It opens in China and Japan on Feb.
Since opening on Thursday, the movie has generated $41 million at the domestic market. "Alita," the cyberpunk CGI spectacle, earned $27 million when it debuted in 3,790 locations and $33 million over the four-day frame. Directed by Robert Rodriguez and produced by James Cameron, the Japanese manga adaptation cost over $170 million to produce — and that's not including the tens of millions spent in marketing. It came in slightly ahead of expectations heading into the weekend, but "Alita: Battle Angel" still has a lengthy uphill battle to become profitable.
and New Line's "Isn't It Romantic." The satirical take on a romantic comedy benefited from opening ahead of Valentine's Day, with $14.2 million during its first four days of release. Rebel Wilson and Liam Hemsworth star in the flick about a woman whose life begins to play out like a PG-13 romantic comedy (the horror!) after getting hit on the head. In third place is Warner Bros.

Hollywood movies like "Alita: Battle Angel" and "How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World" are doing respectable business overseas, but they're proving no match for foreign titles at the international box office.
"Alita" also had sizable debuts in Mexico ($4.2 million), Australia ($2.9 million), and Thailand ($2.5 million). Directed by Robert Rodriguez and produced by James Cameron, the sci-fi adventure has now grossed $94 million internationally. The movie saw the best opening in Russia, where it earned $6.5 million. Fox's "Alita: Battle Angel" led films on the Hollywood front, generated $56 million when it launched in 86 overseas markets this weekend.
Its top markets include the United Kingdom ($3.1 million), Mexico ($1.5 million), and Russia ($792,000).” /> Meanwhile, Warner Bros.' "The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part" added another $12.1 million from 69 international markets for an overseas haul of $34.7 million. The animated sequel is just shy of the $100 million mark worldwide, with ticket sales currently standing at $97.7 million.
Since the movie is based on a popular Japanese manga title, the studio anticipates Asian markets to overperform. It launches in China and Japan next weekend. "Alita: Battle Angel" dominated the domestic box office with its $33 million debut over the long President's Day weekend, but it will be an uphill battle for the $170 million movie to reach profitability.
It releases in North America next weekend. That brings its foreign bounty to $172 million. Among holdovers, the third installment in Universal's "How to Train Your Dragon" series made $21 million this weekend in 49 foreign territories. "How to Train Your Dragon 3" debuted this weekend in Poland with $1.9 million and Ecuador with $600,000.
China's sci-fi epic "The Wandering Earth" pulled in a massive $96.6 million from three territories, bringing its international tally to $606.8 million. Another movie from the Mainland, "Crazy Alien," earned $28 million for an overseas total of $318 million, while fellow local title "Pegasus" brought in $25.7 million, taking its bounty to $238 million. The Chinese New Year is bringing in huge business in the Middle Kingdom.

“Whatever, it’s water under the bridge.” “In third grade I was dating this girl, it was puppy love, but my friend took her away from me. Maybe he had something better to offer her,” said Broussard, chuckling. Being homeschooled for most of his life, Broussard couldn’t relate to the film’s high school love politics, but still remembers his first heartbreak.
However, “The Fosters” actor isn’t afraid to branch out of the genre. “I’d love to do more auteur work and more art house films,” he said. Starring in the upcoming “The Stand-In” opposite Camila Mendes and Netflix’s “Sierra Burgess Is a Loser,” Noah Centineo is no stranger when it comes to teen rom-coms.
Lara Jean and popular jock Peter (Centineo) strike up a pretend relationship — signed contract and all — with the aim of Peter wanting to make his ex-girlfriend jealous. Lara Jean hopes it will convince her older sister Margot’s (Janel Parrish) ex-boyfriend Josh (Israel Broussard), a love letter recipient, to believe she’s not actually in love with him.
Casting Condor as the lead was an easy choice for Johnson, especially as she and author Jenny Han insisted the role be filled by an Asian-American (keeping true to the book). I thought she had a line into Lara Jean’s psyche that no one else did.” “When you see the film, you’ll know just as quickly as I did,” shared Johnson, “She’s so beautiful, smart, effervescent, and kind.
Appearing in films before ("Alita: Battle Angel," "X-Men: Apocalypse"), but never as a lead, 21-year-old Condor was stunned when she got the call. "I curled up in a ball and screamed. “I was like, ‘Say it again!’" she remembered. I wanted it more than anything in the world.” A role like this doesn’t come along often.
“It’s time, that’s all I have to say. Hawaiian-born Parrish agreed. Let’s keep on going, more diversity, all of it. I’m so happy to represent the community.”” />
With temperatures in the mid 80s outside Arclight Culver City on Thursday night, the cast of “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before” were fighting some unfortunate sweat marks while on the red carpet.
What was I thinking, wearing all black!” joked Susan Johnson, the director of Netflix’s latest rom-com. “Who brought a fan?
With the recent release of “Crazy Rich Asians” (the first studio film in 25 years to feature an all Asian-American cast), Condor revealed that she rarely felt represented growing up. “It got to the point where there was so little representation," she said. "I just thought it was normal. My whole reason for doing this is so girls who look like me feel seen.”
“To write a book and then be on set and see all these people working to make my story come to life was a big honor.” Seeing characters brought to life on the big screen is many authors’ dream, and for Han, it was no different. “It was very surreal,” she said.
Based on the 2014 novel of the same name, the film tells the story of Lara Jean Covey (Lana Condor), a meek high school student whose life gets turned upside-down when she finds out the five love letters she’s written and kept stashed away have inadvertently been mailed out.