BEST SOUND DESIGN
BEST SET DESIGN
BEST NEW OPERA PRODUCTION
Forster, who also happens to be a character in the play. playwright Matthew Lopez, which is headed to Broadway, is inspired by and loosely based on the novel “Howards End” by E.M. The two-parter by U.S. The Olivier for best new play went to “The Inheritance,” which explores the relationships and friendships of several gay American men of the post-AIDS-crisis generation.
“Come From Away” was named best new musical. The story of a Canadian town that took in stranded airline passengers immediately after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the musical also won a trophy for choreographer Kelly Devine.
BEST ACTOR IN A MUSICAL
"A Monster Calls"
"The Inheritance"
BEST ACTOR
Stephen Daldry won the Olivier for his direction of “The Inheritance,” and Kyle Soller won for best actor for his performance in the play, which also featured a brief appearance by Vanessa Redgrave. Patsy Ferran won the best actress award for her turn in “Summer and Smoke,” which was named best revival of a play.
“Home, I’m Darling” was named best new comedy.
BEST NEW MUSICAL
"Summer and Smoke"
BEST NEW DANCE PRODUCTION
Patsy Ferran, "Summer and Smoke"
Monica Dolan took home the trophy for best supporting actress in a play, performing opposite Gillian Anderson in "All About Eve." Chris Walley won the best supporting actor award for "The Lieutenant of Inishmore."
Akram Khan, "Xenos"
Jon Clark, "The Inheritance"
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN DANCE
"Katya Kabanova," Royal Opera House
BEST LIGHTING DESIGN
"Flesh and Bone"
"Come From Away" – Book, Music and Lyrics: David Hein and Irene Sankoff; Music Supervisor, Arrangements: Ian Eisendrath; Orchestrations: August Eriksmoen; Musical Director/UK Music Supervisor: Alan Berry; and the band
BEST ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL
BEST NEW COMEDY
Catherine Zuber, "The King and I"
Patti LuPone, "Company"
BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MUSICAL
A gender-swapped revival of Stephen Sondheim’s “Company,” the 9/11-related musical “Come From Away,” and a seven-hour gay-themed play, “The Inheritance,” each won four Olivier Awards in London on Sunday.
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN AFFILIATE THEATRE
Chris Walley, "The Lieutenant of Inishmore"
BEST ENTERTAINMENT AND FAMILY
The ensemble of "Porgy and Bess"
BEST REVIVAL
Sharon D. Clarke, "Caroline, or Change"
Kyle Soller, "The Inheritance"
Jonathan Bailey, "Company"
"Blkdog" by Botis Seva
BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
"Home, I'm Darling"
"Come From Away"
BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MUSICAL
Bunny Christie, "Company"
BEST DIRECTOR
Gareth Owen, "Come From Away"
BEST MUSICAL REVIVAL
Kelly Devine, "Come From Away"
Matthew Bourne” />
Monica Dolan, "All About Eve"
BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
The production won the Olivier for best revival of a musical. It was directed by Marianne Elliott, whose revival last year of “Angels in America,” starring Andrew Garfield and Nathan Lane, also received widespread acclaim. The new iteration of “Company” drew rave reviews – and, unusually, had Sondheim’s permission – for turning the original male protagonist, Bobby, into Bobbi, a thirty-something woman dealing with commitment issues.
SOCIETY OF LONDON THEATRE SPECIAL AWARD
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC
The full list of Olivier Award winners:
Her fellow “Company” cast member Jonathan Bailey, whose lightning-fast, show-stopping rendition of the song “Not Getting Married Today” became a must-see West End event, won for best supporting actor in a musical. Stage icon Patti LuPone took home one of the Oliviers – Britain’s equivalent of the Tonys – for “Company,” for best supporting actress in a musical.
BEST THEATRE CHOREOGRAPHER
BEST NEW PLAY
Kobna Holdbrook-Smith, "The Tina Turner Musical"
BEST COSTUME DESIGN
"Company"
Stephen Daldry, "The Inheritance"
BEST ACTRESS
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN OPERA

Scorsese suggested that society is not only facing a period of great technological evolution but also major change in terms of culture and civilization.
The conversation included screening of an excerpt from his film “The Last Temptation of Christ,” which raised considerable polemic at the time, and which Scorsese revealed he had never seen again since the film’s initial screening.
As Bensaidi mentioned at the start of the conversation, Scorsese has been a direct inspiration for many Moroccan filmmakers, because of the way that his characters and stories resonate with Moroccans.
Scorsese said that films can make things sacred and are intimately linked to aspects such as ritual, protocol and respect.
He suggested that the previous power of film criticism could be a double-edged sword, citing the example of Vincent Canby’s review of Michael Cimino’s “Heaven’s Gate” in the New York Times in 1980. This led to the film being pulled from screens the next day, he said, and forced auteur filmmakers into effective exile from the studio system, which he added only truly ended when Steven Soderbergh’s “Sex, Lies and Videotape” won the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 1989.
That’s enough. We all have to stand there in silence for around two minutes. “The process of making a movie is sacred. It’s a sacred moment.” Everyone is in the room. For example when the sound engineer records what’s called the ‘wild track’ to get the ambient sound. Inevitably they all start meditating.
I began to deal with him as Jake.” He also talked about other actors who have used method acting to metamorphize into their characters, which he said was sometimes a bit intimidating, for example working with Daniel Day Lewis on “Gangs of New York” as “Bill the Butcher” – “We had to be very careful at that time” – or with De Niro on “Raging Bull” – “That was really him.
It upholds the value of cinema as an art form.” Scorsese said that he still watches many films, but now mainly at home, saying that he misses the audience experience. That’s why Marrakech is so important. “The cinema of the past hundred years has gone,” he said. “It’s changed.
“They were given paradise,” he concluded. “But being human, they were kicked out.”” />
During the fest’s 17th edition, he hosted the career tribute to De Niro on Saturday evening and on Sunday participated in a conversation with Moroccan helmers Laila Marrakchi (“Rock the Casbah”) and Faouzi Bensaidi (“Volubilis”). Scorsese is viewed as one of the godfathers of the Marrakech Film Festival, having attended on three previous occasions, including as jury president in 2013.
Scorsese talked about the classic American and Italian films that inspired him to become a filmmaker and dedicated considerable time to talk about the spiritual dimension of cinema.
Matthew Passion,” which is used in the car bomb scene. Finally, the helmer talked about how music is central to the conception of many of his films, citing the example of how he structured “Casino” around Johann Sebastian Bach’s “St.
Netflix took the risk.” He was optimistic about opportunities for independent filmmakers and talked about Netflix. ‘The Irishman’ is a risky film. And of course we’re all getting older. No one else wanted to fund the pic for five to seven years. “People such as Netflix are taking risks.
Scorsese referred to the influence of Elia Kazan’s films “On the Waterfront” and “East of Eden,” and said that he believed method acting was partly influenced by technological advances, with new microphones able to capture whispering dialogue.
Because we now have the power to wipe out mankind. Essentially I keep coming back to these subjects.” It creates a communal bond between people. I may not be a practicing Catholic, but most of my films are about ritual (…) If you’re interested in continuing the human species you have to address core issues such as nurturing love, compassion and understanding other people. “Beliefs have to be refreshed and rethought. That doesn’t mean you reject rituals. Ritual is very important. For example, praying together (…) You’re talking to a regular Catholic who has done a lot of struggling.
The core story in Kazan’s film features two brothers and then there’s a betrayal.” He then quipped: “That’s basically the same movie I’ve been making over the last 45 years.” “I went to see ‘On the Waterfront’ with my brother, and for the first time we saw people on screen that we knew in real life. It didn’t look like acting.
Francis Xavier of the Jesuits – using meditation to re-experience certain moments, such as when Jesus was crucified. Scorsese suggested that Stanislavski’s method acting system was linked to the spiritual exercise advocated by St. He said that when filming “Silence,” lead actor Andrew Garfield succeeded in tapping into this tradition.
“Soderbergh’s film began a resurrection. But the theaters are closing. Young people have to reinvent everything.” These days young independent filmmakers can get their films made.
Nonetheless Scorsese expressed concern about how in the digital universe everything is termed “content.” In particular he lamented the loss of the eco-system associated with cinema, such as the demise of film criticism, which has been reduced to short tweets and the attribution of ratings in the form of stars.
Film Festival Sunday, including the contribution to cinema of streamers like Netflix, the backers of his latest movie, “The Irishman,” starring Robert De Niro and Al Pacino. Martin Scorsese tackled a range of subjects during a discussion on stage at the Marrakech Intl.