The account was detected to be running a third-party application, which provides an unfair in-game advantage, while logged into 'Fallout 76.' “This account has violated the code of conduct and terms of service by cheating.
Bethesda Game Studios recently banned some players who were cheating or modding in the online role-playing game "Fallout 76." But, if the guilty parties want back into the developer's good graces, they can appeal their account closures by writing an essay, according to YouTuber JuiceHead.
Of course, this being the internet, there's a chance the email is a fake, but JuiceHead said he spoke to some Reddit and Twitter users who received it and he believes it's real. That's a pretty creative way of dealing with cheaters.
Variety contacted publisher Bethesda Softworks to confirm that the support email is real — and whether or not any players have actually written the essay — and we'll update this story if we hear back.” /> There's no word on how many "Fallout 76" players were affected by the recent bans.
"If you would like to appeal this account closure, we would be willing to accept an essay on ‘Why the use of third party cheat software is detrimental to an online game community’ for our management team to review."
“The fact that we have three instances of this email across three different posts leads me to believe it’s pretty legit,” he said.

Although JuiceHead's video focuses mainly on whether or not players were banned unfairly, it does contain this snippet from an alleged Bethesda support email:

It's an iconic title that features two spaceships locked in a dogfight, both controlled by human players. Both ships come with a very limited amount of fuel as well as a few torpedoes, and they remain moving when the player eases off on the acceleration. "Spacewar!" was developed in 1962 and is considered the first video game to be played on various computer installations.
Cementing its influence even further, it was given a space on a list of the ten most important video games of all time, kicking off the collection of video games at the Library of Congress.” /> Titles like "Asteroid" were, in fact, inspired by "Spacewar!" as well. It enjoyed a massive amount of popularity during its heyday and became one of the most influential and important games in the medium's infancy.
The Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences is honoring the creators of "Spacewar!" with Pioneer Awards during an upcoming event hosted by the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.
The event is part of the Videogame Pioneers Initiative (VPI) at the Smithsonian, which is a program meant to preserve the history of gaming and the industry's evolution over the years. Audience members will be able to participate in person and online, while those who attend in-person can try historic video games, possibly with the creators of said games.
The Pioneer Awards are given to individuals whose work has "helped shape and define the interactive entertainment industry." Dan Edwards, Martin "Shag" Graetz, Steven Winer, Steve "Slug" Russell, Peter Samson, Robert Sanders, and Wayne Wiitanen will meet to discuss how they created "Spacewar!" in their spare time while working with MIT's first PDP-1 computer. The talk will be moderated by Bethesda Softworks' founder, Christopher Weaver, as the group chats about how computer technology has changed over the past half-century.
“Partnering with The Smithsonian’s Lemelson Center for this special event helps to further share these historical events for future posterity for video game enthusiasts," she said in a statement. The award will be presented by Meggan Scavio, president of the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences.