By the time Christopher Nolan’s “Batman Begins” (2005) came along, the vibrant warrior prince of the 1980s had become a sturdy character player in his sixties.
Check out Rotten Tomatoes: There are no reviews for Olmi’s film and no assessments of Hauer’s incredible titular performance as “Andreas,” a “clochard” or homeless drunk living rough on the streets of Paris. By the late ‘80s, when this Ermanno Olmi masterpiece won the much-deserved Golden Lion Award for best film in Venice, the American arthouse cinema world had receded so far into the past that this much-heralded but virtually unseen gem never even received a theatrical release in the U.S.
Its stature is immeasurably aided by Hauer’s staggering performance as the renegade “replicant,” “Roy Batty,” a humanoid ingeniously crafted by the Tyrell Corporation, but possessing something resembling a soul, the origin of which remains the central mystery of the film. Famously despised by its studio, dismissed by critics and ignored by “Star Wars”-besotted sci-fi fans when it was released, “Blade Runner” today stands as one of the greatest achievements in the history of the sci-fi film genre. One of the most powerful critics of the time, Pauline Kael, dismissed Ridley Scott’s masterpiece completely and called Hauer’s work a “gaga performance is an unconscious burlesque.”  Nearly 40 years later, the film and the performance both stand as towering achievements and Kael’s dismissal stands as astonishingly boneheaded.
But the real object of  Verhoeven’s attention is the elan vital of the aristocrat Erik (Hauer) and his friendship with Guus (Krabbe) as they thread the needle of social entanglements, betrayals and very lethal fascists on their doorstep. Built much like a 1940s Hollywood big screen adventure that would have starred Clark Gable and Douglas Fairbanks, “Orange” boasts two bigger-than-life performances from Hauer and fellow top-tier Dutch thesp Jeroen Krabbe. On the surface, “Orange” is a classic WWII actioner celebrating the plucky best of the Netherlands youth fighting against the evil Nazi empire. Less known than Paul Verhoeven’s edgy, raucous breakout hit, “Turkish Delight,” in many ways “Orange” is the film that really announced Verhoeven as a consummate film craftsman and an international cinema force to be reckoned with.
But although younger film buffs may know him better for the outre genre fare of his later years with titles like “Hobo With Shotgun” and “Scorpion King 4,” in his heyday, Hauer worked with some of international cinema’s finest directors and delivered performances that were simply astounding in their sensitivity and delicacy and a range for the ages, which meant Hauer could swing from outlandish sexual abandon to mournful, elegiac wistfulness, from dare-you-to-blink violent forcefulness to the wistful, forlorn toll of a life of regrets.
Top Brit critic Mark Cousins, a lonely voice in support of this almost completely lost '80s drama, sees Hauer’s performance as so central to the success of the film that he used the character in an open letter to Roeg as a key to the director’s creative intentions: “What do you think when you, the great artificer, see yourself?” asked Cousins. Central to the murder mystery in Brit auteur Nicolas Roeg’s film is the role of Claude, played by a cagey, wary and furtive Hauer. “Do you think of Rutger Hauer’s Claude Maillot Van Horn character in your film Eureka, who, when he sees himself in the mirror, says to his reflection 'I thought it might be you'? He just can’t escape himself, he longs for the rapture of self-loss.” Again, Hauer provides his character with layers and depths that make for a performance that lingers in the memory long after the film has played. He’s disappointed, isn’t he?
“Turkish Delight” (1973)
"Soldier of Orange" (1977)
After early stardom in his home country, he ventured to Hollywood and international films and delivered outstanding, timeless work, but his charisma, depth, and daring never translated into a career as a major European leading man in the same way as earlier Euro icons such as Jean-Paul Belmondo, Alain Delon and Marcello Mastroianni. In a perfect world, the versatile and hard-working (172 acting credits on imdb!) Dutch actor Rutger Hauer, who has died in the Netherlands from cancer, would have had a film or even a franchise that capitalized on his range and blonde good looks of his early years.
The wild, untamed vision of Verhoeven certainly would find a tough time getting financed and accepted by audiences today. That their frazzled, tortuous journey together achieves pathos and tenderness in the final frames is completely due to the fearless of Hauer and his equally dazzling co-star.” /> Very much part of the hippie counter-culture, free love and let’s burn down the world while we’re at it ethos of the '60s and early '70s, Hauer’s rude and rowdy adventurer is a Wilhelm Reich treatise in tight jeans and blousy shirts. Ah, youth. Still shocking today for its casual sadism sandwiched in between dollops of sexual abandon, Hauer’s Eric is matched at every turn by Monique van de Ven’s primal mate Olga.
"Legend of the Holy Drinker" (1988)
Here are five of his outstanding performances:
“Blade Runner” (1982)
When a surprise benefactor gifts him with enough money to wash up, shave, have a meal and begin to engage in a life of hope, Hauer’s rise and fall is a masterclass in great acting. Less known than the canon of Robert Bresson’s religious texts such as “Mouchette” and “Diary of a Country Priest,” “Holy Drinker” is simply a film miracle driven by Hauer’s remarkable performance. Which, in the hands of naturalistic maestro Olmi, means decidedly lower-case “a” acting as subtle and restrained as it gets. But there’s another dimension that lifts this into the class of the greatest films ever made on the subject of spirituality: Hauer plays a man infused with faith and goodness, a lost soul touched by the hand of God.
“Eureka” (1983)

“Okja”
“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”
“Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets”
“Kong: Skull Island”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has selected 10 films to move forward in the visual effects category for the 90th Academy Awards.
Last year’s “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” nabbed an Academy Awards nomination for the team of John Knoll, Mohen Leo, Hal Hickel and Neil Corbould. The original 1977 “Star Wars” won the VFX Oscar for John Stears, John Dykstra, Richard Edlund, Grant McCune, and Robert Blalack, as did 1980’s “The Empire Strikes Back” and 1983’s “Return of the Jedi.” “Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace” and “Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones” also received VFX Oscar nods. “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” also receive an Oscar nomination.
“The Shape of Water”
“Dunkirk”
“Blade Runner 2049”
The list is dominated by big-budget tentpole films such as “Blade Runner 2049,” “Dunkirk,” “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. AMPAS made the announcement on Monday. 2,” “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” and “War for the Planet of the Apes” but also includes South Korean action-fantasy “Okja” and Guillermo del Toro’s Cold War tale “The Shape of Water,” which carries a budget of under $20 million.
“War for the Planet of the Apes”
The original 1982 “Blade Runner” was nominated for a visual effects Oscar for Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich and David Dryer but lost to “E.T. The Extraterrestrial.”
“Alien: Covenant”
Here is the list in alphabetical order:
“The Jungle Book” won the category this year over “Deepwater Horizon,” “Doctor Strange,” “Kubo and the Two Strings” and “Rogue One: a Star Wars Story.” “Ex Machina,” “Interstellar,” “Gravity” and “Life of Pi” are the four previous winners.
All members of the Visual Effects Branch will now be invited to view 10-minute excerpts from each of the shortlisted films on Jan. 6. The Academy’s Visual Effects Branch Executive Committee determined the shortlist. Following the screenings, the members will vote to nominate five films for final Oscar consideration.
The 90th Oscars will be held on March 4 at the Hollywood & Highland Center.” /> Nominations for the 90th Academy Awards will be announced on Jan. 23.
That list included "Beauty and the Beast," "Ghost in the Shell," “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle,” “Justice League,” “Life” “Logan” “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales,” “Spider-Man Homecoming,” "Thor: Ragnarok" and "Wonder Woman." 4. The Academy had announced 20 films that were under consideration on Dec.

“Justice League”
“Thor: Ragnarok”
‘‘Ghost in the Shell”
“Kong: Skull Island”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”
“Ojka”
“Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets”
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has selected 20 films to move forward in the visual effects category for the 90th Academy Awards.
“Alien: Covenant”
AMPAS made the announcement on Monday. The films are listed in alphabetical order below:
“Logan”
“Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales”
“The Shape of Water”
“Beauty and the Beast”
“Wonder Woman”
23. The ceremony will be held on March 4 at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, and will be televised live on ABC.” /> Nominations for the 90th Oscars will be announced on Jan.
“Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle”
“Life”
“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”
“Dunkirk”
“Spider-Man Homecoming”
“War for the Planet of the Apes”
“Blade Runner 2049
The Academy's visual effects branch executive committee determined the preliminary shortlist. The panel will select the 10 films that will advance to nominations voting later this month.

It’s the truth of fearlessly out-there, shoot-the-moon storytelling, a truth that represents the ultimate undermining of Hollywood blockbuster aesthetics: The stalwart all-American hero you’re seeing isn’t a hero at all but a grand illusion, a fake human, a walking hologram, an anti-movie star, an android program impersonating Harrison Ford. This is an idea that exerts an irresistible appeal to a certain breed of fanboy geek whose principal identification is with technology itself. Yet if you're a member of the "Blade Runner" conspiracy cult, the notion that Deckard is actually a replicant is the sci-fi equivalent of the second-gunman theory. It’s the "truth" the System couldn’t handle, and therefore snuffed out. According to this view, "Blade Runner" isn’t just a good sci-fi movie, it’s the brainiac future-shock art film that dared to buck the imperatives of the studio system.
Its storytelling longueurs have been inflated into the very signifiers of its artistry. Many of the film's fans, though, would violently disagree with that, and it’s here that we come to the metaphysical peculiarity of the "Blade Runner" phenomenon. It has become not just a movie but a symbol: the anti-"Star Wars." I remain a fan of "Blade Runner," but to be in the cult of "Blade Runner" is to celebrate the purity of its vision, and to join in a conspiracy theory about the forces that would obliterate that purity. Over the decades, the film has been embraced for its virtues, but also for what I would call its aura of virtue: its transcendental mystique — the fact that it now plays like the sci-fi blockbuster equivalent of slow food.
Roy yearns to continue his existence for no other reason than that he loves life. Hauer’s platinum punk dye job and Teutonic hauteur may make the character seem power-crazed, but in the end he's surprisingly moving; he has what may be the most haunting death scene in all of sci-fi. He’s an android who doesn’t want to stop dreaming. It’s Rutger Hauer’s Roy, the replicant who longs to go beyond his allotted lifespan. That's why the most haunting character in "Blade Runner" isn’t Harrison Ford’s Deckard.
The other metaphor that drives "Blade Runner" is, of course, the spectral notion of replicants, the theme of technology-made-flesh — an idea expressed in the haunting title of Philip K. The detective noir plot of "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" is organized around replicants as a human-created threat to the species. But what gives the tale distinction is that the replicants, in spirit, are us. Dick's 1968 novel, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" Born in 1928, Dick was a writer who lived on the spectrum of schizophrenia, and he had paranoid antennae that could penetrate to the core of what the modern world was doing to us.
This, the movie says, isn’t your father’s "Blade Runner" — no, it’s the "Blade Runner" your father always longed to watch. Perhaps so. Yet it may also be a sign of the times that when you watch "Blade Runner 2049," all the things the movie is ostensibly about — the decay of our world, the mysteries of memory, whether Gosling’s K. dreams of his electric housekeeper — take a back seat to the film’s existence as a fetishistically overdeliberate art geek-out. Could it be a sign of how far we’ve come that a couple of major movie studios have given the go-ahead to a film this uncompromised? Now that it’s here, it will be fascinating to see whether the film can loom as large as the original or merely as a conspiracy demystified, a consummation that only heightens our nostalgia.” />
a replicant is the film’s answer to the Deckard conspiracy theory, its way of saying, "Look, we’re really doing it! The whole idea of making Ryan Gosling’s K. Making the hero a man of implanted thought and feeling." And the film’s languid-to-a-fault narrative strategy (in his Variety review, Peter Debruge compared it, astutely, to an Andrei Tarkovsky film) is its way of staying true to — and upping the ante on — the non-voiceover "Blade Runner" that Ridley Scott thought he was making and then fought the studio to release.
To me, "Blade Runner," unlike "2001: A Space Odyssey," is a visionary movie that falls short of greatness. It’s not that I’m not for directors expressing their true selves. That's an opinion that got locked in for me when I saw the director’s cut, in 1992 (the version now available as "Blade Runner: The Final Cut"), and realized that I liked the compromised, studio-meddled version, with its voice-over and slapped-on "happy ending" (carved out of an outtake from "The Shining"), a little better. It’s that the "pure, uncut" version of "Blade Runner" only served to expose, all the more, the film's bare-bones storytelling and flawed momentum.
He fits right into the film’s rather conventional scheme of having the human beings act, you know, human and the androids act with steely cool determination. Besides, Harrison Ford, smooth-faced and commanding, with barely a trace of the irascibility that would evolve into the grumpy-old-man scowl with which he plays Deckard in "Blade Runner 2049," has a presence of distinctly warm-blooded energy. The whole tension of the Deckard/Rachel love story is that it’s an ever-so-slightly risqué human-meets-android coupling; if Deckard were a replicant, that tension would leak right out of it.
"Blade Runner," Ridley Scott’s visionary 1982 dystopian noir, is a movie with a mystique that now outstrips its reality. It’s a film of majestic science-fiction metaphor, beginning with its opening shot: the perpetual nightscape of Los Angeles in 2019, the smog turned to black, the fallout turned to rain, the smokestacks blasting fireballs that look downright medieval against a backdrop of obsidian blight. There’s a touch of virtual reality to the way we experience it, sinking into those blackened textures, reveling in the details (the corporate Mayan skyscrapers, the synthetic sushi bars, the Times Square meets Third World technolopolis clutter), seeing an echo of our own world in every sinister facet. "Blade Runner" wasn’t the first — or last — image of a desiccated future, but it remains one of the only movies that lets you feel the mechanical-spiritual decay.
Is it just austerely impressive, or is it truly great? But what may be the most striking aspect of "Blade Runner 2049" — and the reason the debate will go on — is that the film has been conceived not simply as a "Blade Runner" sequel but as the ultimate fulfillment of the "Blade Runner" mystique. There is already an intense, and worthy, debate going on about where "Blade Runner 2049" stands as a contemporary science-fiction achievement. Is it long and arid and pretentious, or is it the "Blade Runner" film that, at last, is just long, arid, and pretentious enough? In 2017, it’s exciting to see a mainstream movie ambitious and accomplished enough to provoke that level of debate.
The cornerstone of the conspiracy theory is, of course, the notion that Harrison Ford’s Deckard is actually a replicant. Not: My fellow android. True, there's the moment where Rachel, referring to the interrogation ritual that ferrets out replicants, asks Deckard, "You know that Voight-Kampff test of yours? If we take "Blade Runner: The Final Cut" as Ridley Scott’s definitive statement on the matter, I see no evidence — none! Did you ever take it yourself?" (It's a moment that leads nowhere.) And in the film's most resonant line of dialogue, Roy, before he expires, tells Deckard, "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe." You people. — that Deckard is, or was ever meant to be, a replicant.
"Blade Runner" has a storyline that's thin, serviceable, and more than a touch plodding. He also falls for Sean Young’s porcelain-skinned retro replicant temptress, who's photographed as if she were Kim Novak emerging from the shadows of "Vertigo" — but who should, by all rights, have been more of a femme fatale, and not just a supplicant romantic interest. If you judge a film simply on the power of its metaphors, then "Blade Runner" would have to be reckoned some sort of masterpiece. Deckard is assigned to hunt down four replicant rebels, and one by one, he…well, hunts them down. But there’s an idiosyncrasy to the movie, one that relates to why it was underappreciated in its time. It stuns you with its visual and atmospheric profundity…but it makes you wish its imagistic flair were embodied in a narrative of far greater ingenuity. The film intrigues…and drags.

Sony noted that "Blade Runner 2049," starring Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford, is positioned for a strong run throughout the fall season and pointed to positive upticks on Saturday, stellar reviews, and "excellent" audience reception.
France also took in $3.6 million, followed by Germany with $3.3 million, Spain with $2.6 million, Italy with $2.5 million, Brazil with $1.8 million and Mexico with $1.6 million. Australia launched with $3.6 million, beating out "Interstellar" by 9% and "Gravity" by 28%.
The noir sci-fi sequel took first place in 45 markets, led by $8 million in the U.K., similar to "Interstellar" and 15% ahead of "Mad Max: Fury Road." Russia followed with $4.9 million, topping "Gravity" by 16% and "Mad Max: Fury Road" by 1%.
Upcoming key market releases are South Korea on Oct. 10. 27, and China on Nov. 12, Japan on Oct.
“Blade Runner 2049” is heading for a downbeat $31.5 million opening weekend at 4,058 sites in North America, where it launched well below forecasts. is handling domestic distribution on “Blade Runner 2049,” starring Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford, through its output deal with Alcon Entertainment. Warner Bros.
Denis Villeneuve helms the sequel film, which is set in a bleak 2049 Los Angeles with Gosling starring as an LAPD officer dealing with replicants seeking freedom.” /> Financed by Alcon and Sony and laden with special effects, the film carries a $150 million price tag.
"Blade Runner 2049" has launched with a solid $50.2 million in 63 markets on 15,900 screens, representing 61% of its international footprint for Sony.

"The Golden Circle" opens in France on Oct. 5. 11 with China on Oct. 20 and Japan on Jan.
Chinese sports comedy “Never Say Die” has topped the weekend's international box office with $66 million in only four markets.
The noir sci-fi sequel took first place in 45 markets, led by $8 million in the U.K., similar to “Interstellar” and 15% ahead of “Mad Max: Fury Road.” Russia followed with $4.9 million, topping “Gravity” by 16% and “Mad Max: Fury Road” by 1%.
Mahua Funage's film, adapted from a 2014 stage play of the same name, has totaled $221 million in worldwide grosses in less than two weeks, according to comScore. During its Saturday-Sunday opening last weekend, "Never Say Die" took in $46 million in its first two days in China.
Sony's release of "Blade Runner 2049" finished second during the weekend with $50.2 million in 63 markets on 15,900 screens, representing 61% of its international footprint for Sony.
 ” />
Fox's spy spoof sequel "Kingsman: The Golden Circle" came in a distant third place with $25.5 million in 69 markets, led by $8.2 million in South Korea, where its total has topped $32 million in two weeks. The international total for "The Golden Circle" is now $173.6 million — 45% higher than 2014's original "Kingsma: The Secret Service" — to go with $80 million in North America.
“Dragon,” which stars Andy Lau and Donnie Yen, has topped $60 million worldwide. Chinese martial arts action drama “Chasing The Dragon”  took fifth place with $17.6 million in eight markets.
New Line's horror blockbuster "It" finished fourth with $19.8 million in 65 markets, pushing the international total to $298 million. The worldwide box office for "It" has topped $600 million.