Disney-Pixar's sixth weekend of "Toy Story 4" will follow in fourth with about $9 million, lifting the animated comedy to about $395 million in North America.” /> Sony's fourth weekend of "Spider-Man: Far From Home" should lead the rest of the pack in third place with about $12 million, pushing the domestic total past $340 million.
DiCaprio and Pitt share the big-screen in "Once Upon a Time" with Margot Robbie, Al Pacino, Dakota Fanning, Kurt Russell, Lena Dunham and the late Luke Perry. DiCaprio portrays an aging actor with Pitt as his longtime stunt double in the movie, which is set in 1969 Hollywood. Robbie plays Sharon Tate, who moves in next door to DiCaprio's home prior to the Manson family murders.
It will wind up the weekend with a 10-day total of about $355 million, leaving it among the top 50 domestic grossers of all time. Disney's photo-realistic remake of “The Lion King” raked in a massive $192 million during opening weekend — the eighth biggest North American launch ever — and it's heading for another impressive frame.
Tarantino's “Inglourious Basterds” scored the biggest opening among his eight previous films with $38 million in 2009. The director’s “Django Unchained” is his biggest box office success to date with $425 million worldwide.
Reviews have been strong with a current 87% score on Rotten Tomatoes. The movie premiered at the Cannes Film Festival, 25 years after Tarantino's signature "Pulp Fiction" debuted at the same site. Sony spent $90 million in production fees for "Once Upon a Time," a figure that doesn’t include global marketing costs.
Sony's much-anticipated comedy drama, starring Leonardo Dicaprio and Brad Pitt, is promising R-rated counter-programming and appears to be outperforming pre-release forecasts of a $30 million opening weekend by a wide margin. "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood" opened with $5.8 million in Thursday previews, nearly matching the $6 million that "John Wick: Chapter 3" scored on its way to a $56 million opening weekend on May 17-19.
"The Lion King" is still ruling at North American multiplexes with about $80 million this weekend while Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” is heading for a solid $40 million opening, early estimates showed Friday.

Reginald Hudlin (pictured at right), who received a Best Picture nomination for "Django Unchained," will direct the musical "Beyond the Velvet Rope" with songs by hitmaker Andreas Carlsson.
Together, they make a fairy-tale ascent to the top of the vibrant, yet gritty music industry, wrought with obstacles. The feature tells the story of a young pop star who falls in love with her prolific songwriter as they make their way through the Los Angeles music scene in the late 1970’s.
The deal was negotiated by Weintraub Tobin, Qap Legal and Fox Rothschild.” /> Hudlin is represented by CAA.
Carlsson will produce with Marcus Englefield and George Lee for Storyoscopic Films. Ron Bass, who won an Oscar for the "Rain Man" screenplay, is writing the script with Walter Becker ("Wild Hogs") and G.L. Lambert.
“The ability to work closely with a film rooted in music has been on my bucket list and is a genre that started my career," he said. "The opportunity to blend a well written story with exceptional original songs is a special moment as a director and music lover. The raw reality of ascending and descending and then finding success as an artist of any kind in Hollywood is filled with the kind of emotion that organically allows for great story telling."
Carlsson's credits include “Bye, Bye, Bye” for *NSYNC, “I Want It That Way” for the Backstreet boys, “Waking Up in Vegas” for Katy Perry, “Born to Make You Happy” for Britney Spears and “I Am Alive” for Celine Dion. Carlsson has been nominated for multiple Grammy Awards and was also been named ASCAP Songwriter of the Year.
Hudlin, who directed "House Party" and "Marshall," is also executive producing with Niklas Bergman, Robyn Klein, Andrew Lerios, and Jeremy Ross. He's the former President of Entertainment for BET.