"The Elder Scrolls Online"
"Rocket League"
"Far Cry 5," "Rainbow Six Siege," and "Monster Hunter: World" were some of the top-selling games on Steam in 2018, Valve revealed in a blog post on Thursday.
"Rainbow Six Siege"
"Far Cry 5"
"Most played" here meaning games that had more than 15,000 simultaneous players at some point during the year, Valve said. Many of those titles were also some of the most played in 2018 as well.
Here are Steam's top twelve sellers as measured by gross revenue in 2018:
"Assassin's Creed Odyssey"
"Counter-Strike: Global Offensive"
"Warframe"
Although Valve doesn't disclose specific revenue amounts, it said the list includes all different kinds of Steam revenue, including game sales, in-game transactions, and downloadable content.
"Civilization VI"
"Grand Theft Auto V"
"Monster Hunter: World"
Fan-favorites "Beat Saber" and "Dead Cells" both got nods, respectively.” /> Finally, Valve gave shout outs to the top selling VR titles of 2018 and the top Early Access games that transitioned to full releases this year.
"Dota 2"
Meanwhile, critically-acclaimed platformer "Celeste," action-RPG "Vampyr," and more headline the best new releases on Steam in 2018. Only five titles made it to the list in April, for example, while a busy month like February had a total of 22. "To build this list, we looked at a combination of first-week revenue and overall revenue in 2018 to create a list of games that had achieved a sizable level of commercial success, regardless of when during the year each title released," it said. The list is broken down month-by-month and shows a great deal of variation throughout the year.
"PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds"

"We don’t like the fact that low-level employees make decent money at Blizzard. Okay, we’re going to get rid of the [employee] profit-sharing program. We’re gonna get rid of this program because we need more profits to increase our stock price, and improve our shareholders and the elite 1% of the company." “'Overwatch' isn’t 'Fortnite.' Why have you wronged us? We don’t like this," Brevik said.
I don't know if I even believe it, it was just a hypothetical scenario.” “I have no inside information…. “I was just speculating that this is a possible scenario,” Brevik said.
With the backlash over "Diablo Immortal," Brevik's rant has been used as fuel to keep the fire going. Debate over Brevik's statements started on the Reddit thread at r/LivestreanFail.” />
"And, so, therefore, you don't like this very much, Mike Morhaime?" Brevik added. "Well too f—ing bad, you’re gone!"
At about this point, Brevik's wife, Twitch streamer thejunglequeen, interjects with "We don't know if that's the case," which Brevik acknowledges as true. Brevik left Blizzard back in 2003 to pursue other projects, including "It Lurks Below," released earlier this year under Early Access.
David Brevik, the senior designer of the original "Diablo" ranted about Blizzard on his wife's "Path of Exile" Twitch stream last month, which has now caught the attention of the game community.
Morhaime, co-founder and former president at Blizzard Entertainment, stepped down from the role last month. The employee profit sharing program was cut and then redistributed to employees as a part of their salaries rather than as a bonus, Blizzard explained in a statement last month.
Brevik also told Newsweek that it was "probably my bedtime" and said that he was simply speculating. Earlier in the stream, Brevik told his wife he was "way, way, way too drunk" to be on her stream, so it should be acknowledged that some of Brevik's rant might have been fueled by alcohol.
The announcement of "Diablo Immortal" during BlizzCon 2018 left many "Diablo" fans disgruntled, as a common sentiment was that players don't want a mobile version of the game and felt cheated by not getting any updates on a new PC/console "Diablo" game.
5 stream, before explaining how this might impact Blizzard's financial decisions. Brevik noted how much money 'Fortnite' is making on the Oct. He also stated that he thinks Activision is taking over Blizzard, and noted the loss of key individuals at Blizzard, including Mike Morhaime.