Announced presenters include Angela Bassett, Stephen Colbert, Viola Davis, Michael Douglas, Billy Porter and Zendaya, in addition to much of the "Game of Thrones" cast, including Kit Harington, Emilia Clarke, Peter Dinklage, Sophie Turner and Maisie Williams.” /> Instead, there will be a variety of stars taking the stage to present awards and maintain the show's flow. And, for the fourth time in Emmy history, the ceremony will be host-less, just like the 2019 Oscars.
PT out of the 7,100-seat Microsoft Theater at L.A. P.T., followed by an hour-long arrivals special at 4 p.m. The broadcast will begin with Fox's own pre-show beginning at 3:30 p.m. 22 at 5 p.m. Additionally, viewers can also watch a livestream of the events on Fox.com (with a cable subscription) or the Fox Now app. The ceremony will take place Sept. Live in downtown Los Angeles and broadcast live on Fox.
Whether you're a "Killing Eve" fan eager to see co-stars Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer face off in the same category, a "Veep" enthusiast excited to see Julia Louis-Dreyfus potentially nab the honor of most Emmy wins of any performer in history, or a "Game of Thrones" lover expecting to see the HBO show break more records, this awards season is one for the books. The 71st Primetime Emmy Awards won't be one to miss.

Also drawing interest are Michael Polish’s hurricane-set actioner “Force of Nature” with Mel Gibson and Kate Bosworth, and Voltage Pictures’ action-thriller “The Minuteman” with Liam Neeson.
movie business is undergoing a wave of dramatic consolidation. The U.S.
“There aren’t a lot of U.S. distributors, period,” said Martin Moszkowicz, CEO of Constantin Film, the producer of “Resident Evil.”
That means that the number of major studios have shrunk from six to five. Under its new ownership, it is expected to release fewer than six movies annually, roughly half of what it once fielded in a typical year. The independent film world seems to be teetering. Broad Green and Open Road have gone belly up, Annapurna is dialing down its ambitions after a series of flops, and STX and Lionsgate are flailing as they search for new film franchises. Twentieth Century Fox Film has been subsumed into Walt Disney Studios as part of a larger $71.3 billion deal.
It’s expected to be standing room only when Stuart Ford’s AGC Studios unveils Emmerich’s “Moonfall,” which is budgeted at $150 million, in an intimate presentation to buyers on May 15 at the Carlton Hotel. A few films are drawing buyers' attention. AGC Studios’ Michael Rothstein said the film is “in the spirit of ‘2012,’ with Roland wreaking joyful cinematic havoc on our planet as only Roland can.”
“Despite all the uncertainties, it is actually an exciting time if you have capital and access to talent,” added Harold van Lier, at Anton.
“You are certainly not going to see too many flashy big-budget movies being touted, just because the market can't really afford that kind of budget,” said David Garrett, founder of the sales company Mister Smith Entertainment.
If studios do buy domestic rights to a movie, they often want part of international as well, which makes dealmaking more complex. distribution. Until they do ink a U.S. deal, which would guarantee an impactful marketing campaign, many foreign-based distributors will hold off on purchases. Hardly any of even the big movie projects bowing at Cannes have U.S. Buying at Cannes will, as a consequence, almost certainly remain as targeted as the movie projects themselves.
These include Bankside Films’ “Let Me Count the Ways,” with Emilia Clarke as poet Elizabeth Barrett; See-Saw Films' “The Power of the Dog" from director Jane Campion with Benedict Cumberbatch and Elisabeth Moss; and the STX Intl. As for family entertainment, Kate Winslet voices the horse in Constantin’s “Black Beauty" and Mel Gibson plays Santa Claus in Fortitude’s “Fatman.” thriller “I Care a Lot” with Rosamund Pike.
“It’s better than over the last two years in volume, and quality,” said Moszkowicz.
You cannot beat that.”” /> “In a very small place, in very short time, a lot of people with a lot of energy, enthusiasm, ambition and resources come together. “Cannes is unique,” said Rocket Science founder Thorsten Schumacher, the producer and sales agent of the “Cliffhanger” reboot.
Though the Cannes Film Festival is unfolding an ocean and several time zones away from Hollywood, the aftershocks from the mega-mergers and bankruptcies currently roiling the entertainment industries will likely be felt by the executives and agents prowling the Croisette in search of movies to buy. Major studios are being swallowed up and indie players are dropping like flies.
With the U.S. But in a risk-averse environment, many of Cannes higher-profile movies are keeping a tighter rein on costs. market looking dicier, some foreign territories could help plug the gap. Many have budgets below the $20 million to $25 million range. China, for instance, has a growing appetite for science-fiction movies and family fare.
But what the market lacks in sizzle it makes up for in depth. Most of the films for sale aren’t on the level of “355,” a spy thriller with Jessica Chastain and Lupita Nyong’o that captivated buyers at last year's Cannes.
Amazon Studios returned to dealmaking with a vengeance, while Netflix was also active. However, the Berlin Film Festival, unfolding just a few weeks later, was notably slower and smaller when it came to sales. In contrast, this year’s Sundance Film Festival was red hot despite the systemic issues facing the movie business.
But “the number of higher-profile films seems significantly reduced from years past — and there are absolutely (fewer) big-budget films,” said Rothstein.
But these films have to contend with a new reality. There are a smattering of big-budget films on offer, including Roland Emmerich’s epic “Moonfall” and a “Cliffhanger” reboot that will trade Sylvester Stallone for a female protagonist. Those companies that have survived this period of dramatic change won’t find many splashy titles for sale. Hollywood’s studios are taking fewer risks and releasing fewer films.

Yet despite the many times the boys drop f-bombs, they retain an innocence. Those "sixth-grade things" involve shenanigans like intentionally smuggling drugs, learning how to kiss, and running from the police.
"Annabelle's been watching 'Dateline,'" the three whisper among themselves. "She knows what cocaine is."
The young stars of the film — Jacob Tremblay, Keith Williams, and Brady Noon — told the audience they were relieved to be in the presence of grown-ups.
So if you wouldn't mind signing the release that's coming around…" "We're super glad to be with adults because we're not even allowed to see our own movie," Tremblay joked of the film, which likely secured a hard R-rating. "But not anymore. We finally get to watch it because we're with a room full of adults.
"Ever since we made 'Superbad,' our work, we think honestly has very much matured over the years," Rogen told the crowd of theater owners at Caesars Palace. "We're growing up, I'm wearing a suit."
Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg's upcoming comedy "Good Boys" answers the age old question: "How f—ed up can one day get?"
Tremblay's character's younger sister pops in to assert her drug knowledge, saying, "I know what cocaine is." One moment in the trailer that played particularly well in the room unfolded as the boys hid out in a tent made out of sheets.
During the studio's presentation to exhibitors, Universal showcased footage and brought out big names for upcoming titles, including the "Fast and Furious" spinoff "Hobbs & Shaw," with Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham; "Last Christmas," a rom-com starring Emilia Clarke, Henry Golding, and Emma Thompson; and "Cats," the big-screen adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Tony-winning musical.” /> 16. "Good Boys," which premiered at this year's SXSW Film Festival, hits theaters on Aug.
The duo behind hit comedies like "Superbad," "Pineapple Express," and "Sausage Party" took the stage at CinemaCon, the annual exhibition trade show taking place in Las Vegas, to tease what Rogen refers to as their "Most refined, cultured work to date."
Peter Levinsohn, president and CEO of Universal Filmed Entertainment Group, introduced the cast. Before Rogen and crew took the stage, Levinsohn mused about the "disruption" roiling the theatrical business, alluding to the media consolidation taking place and the rise of streaming services.
We need to start doing sixth-grade things." The footage starts with Tremblay's character telling his friends, "We're in sixth grade now.
"This reinvention process can be really exciting," said a decidedly unenthused-sounding Levinsohn. His remarks were frostily received by the audience of theater owners, many of whom are none too pleased with the changes taking place in the business.
Please believe this is not us, but our characters." Before the trailer rolled, Tremblay threw in one final disclaimer: "We apologize for what we're about to do and say.
"Nobody wants to follow Led Zeppelin, but someone has to do it." "It's hard to follow such an electrifying presentation," Rogen joked of Levinsohn's clearly well-rehearsed remarks.