The service provides live and on-demand content viewable on smartphones, tablets, connected TVs and computers. YouTube TV is priced at $40 per month, offering a lineup of over 60 networks that includes ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC (with all four available in over 90% of markets), plus cable networks like TNT, TBS, CNN, ESPN and FX. The service offers a cloud DVR with no storage-space limits (with recordings stored for nine months), as well as up to six individual accounts per membership.
Conkling, who started at YouTube on March 11, is based in New York. Conkling takes over for Heather Moosnick, who left YouTube last fall to join Hulu as senior VP of content partnerships. She reports to Kelly Merryman, VP of content partnerships.
"Lori is an exceptional team leader and strategic thinker, and we're looking forward to working with her as we continue to build the future of entertainment." "We're excited to welcome Lori to YouTube to lead content partnerships for YouTube TV and Google Fiber," Merryman said in a statement.
YouTube TV competes with conventional cable and satellite TV operators, as well as other services in the crowded OTT television space including Hulu With Live TV, AT&T’s DirecTV Now, Dish Network’s Sling TV, Sony’s PlayStation Vue and FuboTV. The internet-TV providers have angled to win subscribers with cheaper pricing, more flexible bundle options and enhanced features.” />
Conkling’s appointment comes on the heels of YouTube TV nationwide expansion across all U.S. markets earlier this year, after launching in April 2016 in five initial markets.
In her new role at YouTube, Conkling will lead programming and packaging strategies, including negotiating all content deals in the pay-TV ecosystem inclusive of broadcasters, cable networks, regional sports networks, and affiliates. She also will be a lead representative for YouTube TV to industry organizations and influencers, advertisers, distribution partners, and YouTube creators.
Before joining NBCU in 2013, she led negotiations with pay-TV distributors for the Walt Disney Co., Lifetime Networks and A+E Networks. At NBCU, Conkling oversaw NBCU's digital investments, including in Jeffrey Katzenberg and Meg Whitman's Quibi and Zola, in addition to executing commercial deals that expanded the media conglomerate's reach across the multiplatform ecosystem. While at Disney, Conkling was instrumental in the launch of ESPNU, ESPN's college sports network.
She comes to YouTube from after six years at NBCUniversal, where she was EVP of strategy and business development focused on digital. Lori Conkling is joining YouTube as global head of partnerships for YouTube TV and Google Fiber.

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The companies said they would partner on ESPN’s direct-to-consumer product, a streaming-video sports service slated to launch in early 2018, and have agreed to make use of data analytics from Altice. Under the terms, Altice's Optimum cable service will continue to provide access to WABC in New York, Disney Channel, Disney Junior, Disney XD, ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU, ESPNEWS, ESPN Deportes, ESPN Goal Line, ESPN Bases Loaded, ESPN3 and Freeform, along with Disney content related to those outlets distributed via digital and on-demand. Optimum will add ESPN’s SEC Network in late 2018, and launch ACC Network in place of another ESPN network the companies did not name in August 2019.
Disney suggested Altice would allow its networks to go off the air, while Altice indicated it thought Disney was charging too much for ESPN. Just a few days ago, analysts expected talks between the two companies to break down and each side began running commercials touting talking points in the discussions.
“We are pleased with the value and terms agreed to and we thank our customers for their support while we worked on their behalf to reach a fair agreement," said Michael Schreiber, executive vice president and chief content officer of Altice USA, in a statement.
Walt Disney Company and Altice said they had come to new terms on a carriage deal that will keep ESPN, ABC and Disney Channel, among other networks available to thousands of households in the New York and Connecticut, among other localities.
The companies did not disclose the financial terms of the agreement or indicate how long it would be in place.