Henson has made $36 million in its first two weeks of release. Paramount's gender-bending remake, "What Men Want" came in fourth place, bringing in $10.8 million during its second outing. The comedy starring Taraji P.
The rest of February will make for tough comparisons since Marvel's more inclusive take on the superhero genre generated a massive $700 million in North America alone during its long run in multiplexes.” /> To nobody's surprise, ticket sales are down almost 60% from last year when "Black Panther" delivered a record-breaking $202 million debut.
"Alita: Battle Angel" just barely fended off Warner Bros.' "The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part." Last weekend's champ dropped to the No. All three titles are targeting younger audiences. The animated sequel based on the popular kids toys has hefty competition on the horizon. Next weekend sees the release of "How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World" and Disney's "Captain Marvel" not far behind. 2 spot, adding another $21.2 million for a domestic haul of $62.6 million.
Fox originally intended to drop the movie in December, where it would have competed with a lineup that included "Aquaman," "Mary Poppins Returns," and "Bumblebee." By doing so, "Alita" avoided getting steamrolled a la "Mortal Engines," Universal's sci-fi epic that flopped in spectacular fashion when it debuted right around that time. With that said, it looks like the studio made the right decision pushing back "Alita's" release date. In its first weekend, "Alita" has already passed the entire domestic haul of "Mortal Engines," the $100 million movie that stalled out with $15 million in North America.
Its $11.4 million bounty since opening on Wednesday is almost half of what tracking services estimated heading into the weekend. Universal and Blumhouse's slasher sequel launched in fifth place with $9.8 million over the weekend. Fellow new release "Happy Death Day 2U" didn't fare as well from the holiday. The good news, at least, is the movie only cost $9 million so it won't take much for "Happy Death Day 2U" to end up in the black. It's also a steep decline from the opening weekend of its predecessor, "Happy Death Day," which bowed with $26 million.
The Dwayne Johnson-produced WWE drama expands nationwide next weekend. It generated the best screen average of the weekend with $40,896 per location. On the indie front, MGM's "Fighting With My Family" brought in $131,625 over the three-day frame and is expected to make $163,584 through Monday.
Ticket sales are on pace to be the smallest bounty for the holiday frame in almost 20 years, since 2000's crop of movies brought back $133 million in receipts, according to Comscore. Tracking services estimate that this will be one of the lowest grossing President's Day weekends in years. Fox's sci-fi adventure "Alita: Battle Angel" dominated in North America, but its opening weekend win isn't leaving the box office with much to celebrate.
Unlike critics, audiences seem to be enjoying "Alita: Battle Angel." Moviegoers branded the blockbuster with a promising A- CinemaScore, suggesting that positive word of mouth could lead Rosa Salazar's cyborg heroine to a long life in theaters. Another promising sign?
The movie will now bank on international markets to get "Alita" out of the red. 22. "Alita" certainly didn't set any new President's Day weekend records, but it did benefit from its new release date that saw most kids out of school over the holiday. The movie is resonating overseas, where it pulled in $56 million this weekend when it opened in most major foreign markets. That takes its international bounty to $94 million. It opens in China and Japan on Feb.
Since opening on Thursday, the movie has generated $41 million at the domestic market. "Alita," the cyberpunk CGI spectacle, earned $27 million when it debuted in 3,790 locations and $33 million over the four-day frame. Directed by Robert Rodriguez and produced by James Cameron, the Japanese manga adaptation cost over $170 million to produce — and that's not including the tens of millions spent in marketing. It came in slightly ahead of expectations heading into the weekend, but "Alita: Battle Angel" still has a lengthy uphill battle to become profitable.
and New Line's "Isn't It Romantic." The satirical take on a romantic comedy benefited from opening ahead of Valentine's Day, with $14.2 million during its first four days of release. Rebel Wilson and Liam Hemsworth star in the flick about a woman whose life begins to play out like a PG-13 romantic comedy (the horror!) after getting hit on the head. In third place is Warner Bros.

James Cameron and Laeta Kalogridis adapted the script from Yukito Kishiro's manga series "Gunnm," and the Fox sci-fier holds a 59% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Robert Rodriguez's cyberpunk action film starring Christoph Waltz and Rosa Salazar scored $7.53 million on Friday. "Alita" marks a risk for the studio, with a costly $170 million production budget.
"What Men Want" has earned $28 million in its first eight days. The second weekend of Paramount's "What Men Want," starring Taraji P. Henson, should land in fourth with about $11 million, though the debut of Universal-Blumhouse's "Happy Death Day 2U" could pick up the slot with an estimated $10.54 million. The "Happy Death Day" sequel, which hit theaters Wednesday, should have pocketed $26.25 million globally through Sunday, somewhat below earlier forecasts.
"Alita: Battle Angel" is holding a slim lead ahead of "Lego Movie 2's" second frame with an estimated four-day take of $29.1 million from 3,790 North American locations.
Warner Bros. and New Line's anti-rom-com took in $4.18 million on Friday. Rebel Wilson's "Isn't It Romantic" is opening at 3,444 theaters for a four-day estimate of $14 million.
Liam Hemsworth also stars in the send-up, with Wilson playing a woman who finds herself trapped in a romantic comedy despite believing in their inherent sexism and lack of realism. Todd Strauss-Schulson directed from a script by Erin Cardillo, Dana Fox, and Katie Silberman. The film has a 68% positive rating on Rotten Tomatoes.
Also premiering this weekend is MGM's "Fighting With My Family" at four locations, along with Sony Pictures Classics' "Ruben Brandt, Collector" at two sites and IFC's "Donnybrook" at 80 theaters.” />
Israel Broussard, Phi Vu, Rachel Matthews, Suraj Sharma, and Ruby Modine also star. Though the horror pic is pacing well behind its predecessor, which opened to $26 million over three days on its way to a $125 million global tally, it has a quick route to profitability, with just a $9 million budget. Star Jessica Rothe reprised her role for "Happy Death Day 2U," with director Christopher Landon also returning to helm and taking over writing duties from Scott Lobdell.
Warner Bros.' "Lego Movie 2," starring Chris Pratt and Elizabeth Banks, has taken in $64 million worldwide since its debut last weekend.
"Lego Movie 2: The Second Part," meanwhile, is heading for about $25 million for a domestic tally of around $66 million. The two films lead the pack for a relatively sluggish President's Day weekend, with the top 12 films totaling significantly below last year's revenues, which were given a massive boost from the $242 million (four-day) premiere of "Black Panther."

All of the films in the series have a political slant, he argues. The film hits theaters on July 4, and Blum says it will deal with racial tensions in America. Instead, Blum is gearing up for "The First Purge," a prequel that will explain the series' central premise — a portrait of a dystopian society that suspends laws for one day every year. For instance, 2013's "The Purge" was primarily a parable about gun control, while 2016's "The Purge: Election Year" grappled with class warfare, something that was eerily prescient when Donald Trump captured the White House a few months later on a populist message.
"I could not have pulled it off," admitted Blum during a recent interview with Variety. It’s a big movie." "I would have loved to produce the movie, but I don’t think we would have done it as well as they did it, because it’s a totally different space that we operate in.
"If every time there’s a shooting in the United States, the government's answer is put more guns in people’s hands then what 'The Purge' is showing doesn't seem all that crazy," he said. "Donald Trump keeps saying 'give teachers guns.' I could see him saying, 'let people shoot whoever they want to for 12 hours a year.'"
His list of credits ranges from "The Purge" to "Insidious" to last year's Oscar-winning "Get Out." But there's one recent horror smash that doesn't carry Blum's imprimatur, and it's a film that the producer admits he never could have made.
Jason Blum is one of the most successful producers in the horror business.
"Effects in horror movies are almost impossible to do well and that's why you rarely see them in our movies." "The effects in that movie were spectacular," said Blum.
"Horror does incredible things," said Blum. 'The Purge' reaches an audience that isn’t thinking of gun control every day and might start thinking of gun control." "It reaches an audience in which politics may not be front of mind and it makes politics front of mind.
Much of the budget on "A Quiet Place" was spent crafting its terrifying and tentacled creatures. It's also because there aren't a lot of special effects. The costs do climb in each subsequent installment, sometimes reaching $10 million or above for sequels. Part of that belt-tightening is attributable to a financial model in which actors and directors take a lower upfront fee in exchange for a percentage of the profits. The film was instead produced by Platinum Dunes, "Transformers" director Michael Bay's shingle, and had a more robust price tag than Blum's micro-budget offerings. Blumhouse films that aren't part of a pre-existing franchise have budgets under $5 million.
Nor is the grim future it imagines different from our current, politically divided present, Blum argues.
Also on deck are the Hulu series "Into the Dark," a sequel to "Happy Death Day," and "Glass," a mashup of "Split" and "Unbreakable." That's due out in October, just in time for the titular holiday. Blum's dance card is full. This summer sees the release of HBO's "Sharp Objects," a twisty thriller he produced, and he's also prepping for a reboot of "Halloween" with Jamie Lee Curtis returning to the role of Laurie Strode.
That would be "A Quiet Place." John Krasinski's sly riff on the alien invasion genre was the breakout hit of the spring, grossing $326.3 million on a $21 million budget.
"If Jordan wants to do a sequel, I'll do it in a second, but it has to come from Jordan Peele," said Blum. "I think he's flirting with the idea."” />
And even the snootier set is taking notice. It's a tough act to follow, but Blum isn't ruling out a "Get Out 2." "Get Out" was written and directed by Jordan Peele and hit a nerve with its portrait of race and socioeconomics, a critique it delivered while also being extremely scary. "Get Out" represented a rare brush with legitimacy for the horror genre. The film earned critical raves and picked up four Oscar nods, including a best picture nomination, something that's nearly unheard of for a scary movie.
He noted that "A Quiet Place" was confident enough in its creature creations that it showed them extensively.
"It’s a no-no, because every time you get a look at it, it's often much less scary than what you could have imagined. That's not true in this movie, and that's to their credit." "You get a good look at the monster, which is usually a real no-no in horror," said Blum.