Paramount's "Rocketman," a fantasy musical about Elton John, added another $8.5 million this weekend, boosting its overseas sales to $67 million.
Sony's "Men in Black: International" is making good on its title, leading overseas box office charts with $74 million from 56 foreign territories.
Rounding out the top five internationally is Universal and Illumination's "The Secret Life of Pets 2." The animated sequel dug up $8.5 million from 36 overseas territories, bringing its foreign tally to $62 million. This weekend saw openings in Indonesia with $500,000, India with $400,000, and Romania with $200,000.” /> It has generated $154.6 million worldwide.
The musical remake crossed $724 million in box office receipts, with $460 million of that haul coming from international audiences. Meanwhile, moviegoers are still flocking to Disney's "Aladdin," which posted another $47.5 million from 55 territories.
Gary Gray directed the fourth installment in the franchise, which comes 25 years after the first film with Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. F. "Men in Black: International" sees "Thor: Ragnarok" co-stars Tessa Thompson and Chris Hemsworth reteam, this time on a mission to protect Earth from the scum of the universe. Combined with its disappointing $28 million start in North America, the latest chapter in the sci-fi action series debuted with $102.2 million globally. Sony and Columbia Pictures co-financed with Tencent Pictures and Hemisphere Media Capital, spending $110 million to produce the movie.
Meanwhile, "Godzilla: King of the Monsters" collected $14.1 million from 79 international territories. That brings its overseas tally to $245.8 million for a global bounty of $339.5 million.
Another Disney title, "X-Men" entry "Dark Phoenix," hasn't enjoyed the same kind of attention. The superhero sequel continues to struggle to sell tickets, adding $24 million from 44 markets during its second weekend in theaters. "Dark Phoenix" has made $204 million worldwide to date.
"Men in Black: International" had the strongest start in China, collecting $26.3 million in ticket sales. Other top markets include Russia with $5.1 million, South Korea with $4.9 million, followed by Mexico ($3.9 million), Japan ($3.5 million) and the United Kingdom ($3.4 million).

Previously announced titles in other territories include: “Organize Isler Sazan Sarmali” in Turkey, and “The Garden of Evening Mists,” with high-profile multinational cast of Lee Sinje, Hiroshi Abe and Sylvia Chang, in Malaysia.
Comedy romance “Our Love Forever,” directed by Wirat Hengkongdee, and “That March,” directed by Chookiat Sakveerakul (“13 Beloved”) are respectively set for June and September releases. One of the biggest Korean hits, “The Classic” is currently getting remake treatment in Thailand, where CJ has partnerships with Major Cineplex and with producer and broadcaster Workpoint. “Classic Again” is now in production under the direction of Thatchaphong Suphasri, and set for a third quarter release.
In February, CJ released two films in Vietnam – romcom “Singles Make Couples” and period comedy “A Story of Quynh,” which was released in time for the Lunar New Year holidays and became the sixth-highest- grossing film of all time in Vietnam.” />
At FilMart in Hong Kong, CJ unveiled a slate of 13 new titles hailing from the U.S., Turkey, Thailand, Indonesia and Vietnam.
Korean entertainment powerhouse CJ Entertainment has amped up its overseas filmmaking efforts to the point that it is now producing more movies outside Korea than at home.
In the U.S., Joel David Moore (“Youth in Oregon”) is directing an American remake of hit thriller “Hide and Seek.” Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Jacinda Barrett and Joe Pantoliano star. Drake Doremus (“Like Crazy,” “Equals”) is directing a previously announced, untitled comedy starring Shailene Woodley, Jamie Dornan and Sebastian Stan from an original script. Both are now in post-production without confirmed release dates.
“And we have strong IP.” “We are not just passive investors. In Thailand and Vietnam we are working with partners but are also fully involved in packaging, casting, distributing and selling,” said Choi Yeonu, chief producer within CJ’s international production team.
by producing quality local films together,” said Jerry Ko, CJ’s head of international. “Our aim is to find hidden gem-like creators in local industries, and support them …
The company’s “Miss Granny” has been remade in seven countries, while its “Sunny” has been made in Korea, Vietnam and Japan. A fourth, in Indonesia, was unveiled earlier this month.
Goodhouse.id is producing game-to-film adaptation “Dreadout,” while Pichouse Films is producing “Death Whisper,” a remake of classic Korean horror “Whispering Corridors.” Action comedy “Hit and Run” stars Joe Taslim, Tatjana Saphira and Yayan Ruhian in a tale of a celebrity cop whose mission to arrest a drug lord goes awry. In Indonesia, where CJ-CGV is the third-largest cinema chain, CJ has multiple producing pacts with Shanty Harmayn’s Base Films, with Wicky Olindo’s Screenplay Films, and a three-film deal with prolific producer-director Joko Anwar.

Louthan said that working closely with local line producers and service companies in the region will improve filmmaking efficiency for Palanquin titles – with a longer prep time and more effective shooting schedule – it will also help raise local production standards.
For Westerners making movies in Asia, logistics can be problematic. And, for Asian filmmakers able to navigate local conditions, screenwriting for international audiences and access to markets can still be stumbling blocks.
Other recent examples of international shows that struggled with their production logistics include Michael Mann’s film “Dhaka,” which substituted Thailand for Bangladesh, and Netflix series “Sacred Games.” Louthan and Joffe previously tried to mount "The Lovers" [aka "Singularity"], a big-budget international film in India, but ended up relocating to Australia.
A start date has not yet been finalized.” /> Joffe told Variety that almost the entire first two episodes of “Mata Hari” will be shot in Indonesia.
Those audiences are interested in seeing more contemporary, modern stories than the Bollywood standard,” said Louthan. But there is a problem. Worldly, often well-traveled individuals who can afford a wide screen TV and high-speed internet. “(India’s) SVOD audience is very different from the Bollywood norm. “(International SVOD companies) will quickly tire of the lack of transparency, chaos and unpredictability of local producers. Costs will go up, production value down and eventually they will likely want to flee.” It's populated by young, educated Indians.
Veteran producer and executive Guy Louthan (“The Mist,” “Raising Arizona”) is now developing a business that straddles East and West, deploys American production standards and techniques, and maximizes Asian cultural impact. It also comes at a time when global interest in Indian and Southeast Asian content is growing thanks to the aggressive local production strategies of Amazon, Netflix and HBO.
The company is also readying Joffe’s series “Ugly,” a 10-part reimagining of Victor Hugo’s classic “The Hunchback of Notre Dame.” Set in Paris, the modern retelling follows the real Comte De Chateaupers, the deformed child given away at birth, whose gift for music eventually thrived. Meanwhile, a killer is stalking the cobblestone streets in the night.
“Countries in Southeast Asia are very keen to develop their film and TV industries,” he said. “Roland is keen to help further the local indigenous side of the business plan by mentoring and developing local talent and material.”
What they believed to be a natural phenomenon, however, may actually be caused by something ancient that has been awakened. Also on the slate is the feature thriller “The Deluge,” written by Rowan Joffe, Roland Joffe’s son, and writer of “28 Weeks Later,” George Clooney-starring film “The American,” and the Amazon Prime series “Tin Star.” It sees a young family stranded following a tsunami that rips across the coast of Indonesia.
The Palanquin company that Louthan formed with British director Roland Joffe aims to bridge the gap with a slate of its own movies, close connections to local production services firms and a possible film fund once the business model has proved itself. He aims to provide full financial transparency and Asian creative involvement while delivering films that are likely to combine local and foreign locations, while using multiethnic casts in films that will be in English and local languages.
“The push into India and Southeast Asia is so desperate that assumptions are often made, and are often wrong,” Louthan told Variety. “Asian companies often have little knowledge of the issues they are going to face – the necessity of completion months in advance of screening, HR issues, #MeToo issues and more – just trying to deliver something they have made.” From the Asian production side the differences go significantly beyond different contracts and production services agreements.
Palanquin’s previously announced titles “Line of Descent,” set in India, but shot in India, Mexico and the U.S., the Alaska- and India-set noir-thriller “Call Center,” and Joffe’s recently confirmed “Mata Hari” miniseries are considered to be proof of concept.

With $330 million globally, "The Nun" is now the highest grossing film in the "Conjuring" universe worldwide. It generated another $16.2 million in 80 markets this weekend, bringing its internationally tally to $221 million.
"Smallfoot" opened in Mexico with $3.6 million on 2,551 screens, as well as Australia with $1.4 million in 312 locations, and Brazil with $1.3 million in 917 venues.
If estimates hold, the Warner Bros.' thriller will notch the No. "The Nun" is in the habit of dominating the international box office. 1 spot overseas for the fourth weekend in a row.
The British spy comedy had the best starts in Indonesia ($2.3 million), Finland $600,000), India ($500,000), and Norway ($400,000). Universal's "Johnny English Strikes Again" came in second overseas with $14.2 million in 41 international markets. Rowan Atkinson portrays the title character for the third installment in the Johnny English series. "Johnny English Strikes Again" opens in the U.S. 26. It has generated $44.2 million to date. on Oct.
That's a promising debut, given the film's $29 million production budget.” /> Tiffany Haddish and Kevin Hart's comedy launched in North America with $28 million, brining its global start to $33.5 million. Among new offerings, Universal's "Night School" premiered with $5.5 million in 19 territories.
The film, featuring the voice cast of Channing Tatum, James Corden, Common, LeBron James, and Zendaya, debuted in North America this weekend with $23 million. also nabbed third place as the animated comedy "Smallfoot" picked up $14 million when it launched in 49 territories. Warner Bros. Otherwise, family-friendly fare dominated the international box office.
The fifth installment in the "Conjuring" series had the best showing this weekend in France with $2.3 million on 367 screens, followed by Russia with $1.7 million in 1,795 locations, and Italy with $1.4 million in 429 venues.
Rounding out the top five is "The House With a Clock in Its Walls." Jack Black and Cate Blanchett's fantasy film amassed $9.4 million this weekend for an overseas tally of $21 million. Universal, Amblin, and eOne handled distribution overseas. In total, it has earned $65.8 million worldwide.
The animated superhero sequel first launched 16 weeks ago. "Incredibles 2" debuted in Germany this weekend with $5.7 million. It is now the second-biggest animated release of all time, behind only Disney's "Frozen." Now, it has earned over $1.2 billion worldwide, including $603 million overseas. Disney-Pixar's "Incredibles 2" grossed $11.9 million in 21 international markets.

Other strong holdovers were in the U.K. and Ireland ($1.8 million), Korea ($1.8 million), and Germany ($1 million). The jukebox musical debuted in Japan with $1.8 million. Here We Go Again" is still posting strong numbers, generating $11.8 million for an international tally of $229.9 million. It has made $345.2 million worldwide. Universal's "Mamma Mia!
It opened in Spain with $1.2 million, India with $575,000, and France with $525,000. Sony's "Alpha," produced by Studio 8, premiered in Russia with $3.2 million.
might be ruling the domestic box office, but Disney remains a force overseas. Warner Bros.
Mark Wahlberg's "Mile 22" generated $5.6 million when it bowed in 11 international markets. It releases next in France, Australia and New Zealand, and Mexico. The STX action thriller has made $6.3 million overseas and $31.2 million globally. It saw the biggest launch in the United Arab Emirates with $1.3 million, followed by Indonesia with $1.5 million.
To date, it has generated $40.4 million globally.” /> Rounding out the weekend, "BlacKkKlansman" bowed in France with $2.2 million and the U.K. and Ireland with $1.3 million for an international weekend total of $5.6 million.
It opened in Indonesia with $500,000. Disney's "Christopher Robin" picked up $5.9 million in 32 international markets for a weekend total of $12.2 million. With $35.1 million abroad and $77.6 million domestically, the film has now crossed $100 million worldwide.
Meanwhile, "Mission: Impossible – Fallout" amassed another $13 million overseas, taking its international tally to $344.8 million. The sixth installment in Tom Cruise's action franchise generated $8 million this weekend in North America for a worldwide cume of $538 million.
To date, Paul Rudd and Evangeline Lilly's sequel has generated a massive $544 million globally, including $333 million overseas and $212 million in North America. It has yet to open in Japan.
Elsewhere, Sony's "Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation" crossed $300 million internationally. The animated threequel delivered $17.8 million in 62 markets this weekend, taking the global total to $460.4 million.
It picked up $25 million during its second outing in North America, an impressively small drop of just 6%. title, "Crazy Rich Asians," scored $6 million in 18 international markets. Another Warner Bros. Other top markets include the Philippines ($1.5 million), Malaysia ($749,000), Taiwan ($435,000), and Hong Kong ($422,000). In Singapore, the romantic comedy brought in $1.8 million.
The shark thriller generated $32.7 million this weekend for an international tally of $303.3 million. It bowed this weekend in France with $4.5 million on 428 screens. Warner Bros.' "The Meg" is still chewing off sizable numbers of its own as it crosses $400 million worldwide.
Disney and Marvel's "Ant-Man and the Wasp" returned to dominate the worldwide box office. That brings its international weekend total to $71 million in 28 markets. The superhero tentpole generated $68 million when it opened in China, marking the fourth highest debut for a Marvel film in the Middle Kingdom.

Speaking at TV conference and market MipTV in Cannes, France, on Monday, where she received Variety’s Achievement in International Television Award, Rohana Rozhan, group CEO and executive director of Malaysian media group Astro, emphasized that the company would play to its strengths as the market evolved.
“And we have always broken it down into three major pillars: as far as we are concerned, as I said, we are a consumer company, we are a content company, and we are about bringing the right experience and the right value proposition to each and every costumer.” “We have always seen ourselves as more of a consumer company [than a pay-TV company], and that has always been a core-strength and a core-focus of ours,” Rozhan said.
She said that what differentiates the company is that it has “a second-to-none team who are really good at executing our plans.”
Regarding local censorship, Rozhan said that they wanted a “level playing-field,” where all outlets – including online operators – were governed by the same regulations regarding permissible content.” />
This led to a greater investment in local content, and the launch of the digital service Njoi, which gives consumers free access to 29 channels. “People need to see and hear languages and people on TV that reflect the marketplace,” she said. “That widens our reach and by virtue of that, we get a bigger reach, a bigger engagement and then we become more relevant to advertisers,” she said. Astro realized that it needed local content as well to get to a higher level of penetration in the market.
Two decades after its launch, the satellite television company, which started off as a purely pay-TV operator, has extended its business into free-TV, streaming, mobile, e-commerce, e-sports and gaming, and is involved in the production of TV shows and films. Astro reaches 75% of households in Malaysia, and is now extending its footprint into other markets in South-East Asia.
“The time is right for collaboration with like-minded partners,” she said. “We are not egotistical enough to think we can do it all on our own.” The company is now looking beyond the borders of Malaysia for future growth, and it has started to produce content for neighboring countries like Singapore, Indonesia and Thailand, such as “Police Evil 2” with a partner in Indonesia.
The company launched with 23 channels, which were a mixture of Indian, Chinese and international channels. When the company launched, the handful of free-TV channels that existed in Malaysia were obliged to air 80% of their shows in the Malay language, so Astro focused on foreign shows to offer an alternative. “What Malaysians were missing at that time was choice,” Rozhan said.
The company has 5.5 million customers, of which 3.3 million are pay-TV customers. Chord-cutting is not an issue: churn for pay customers is “global best in class” at 9.6% amortization, she said.