“There are very, very few downsides to having a hugely popular show, but one I can think of is when you try to end it, many people have big opinions on how it should end," Bloys began. "The petition shows a lot of enthusiasm and passion for the show, but it wasn’t something that we seriously considered."
Later on, Bloys commented on the status of the "Thrones" prequel series, which is set to star Naomi Watts.
The cast was amazing, Jane (Goldman) and SJ (Clarkson) are busy in the edit bay," he revealed. "Shooting has wrapped, it looks really good.
Bloys added that the backlash against the original series did not affect HBO's thinking or process on the sequel.
Speaking at HBO's TCA summer press tour event, the pay cabler's programming chief Casey Bloys was asked about the controversial final season of "Game of Thrones" and the fan petition which demanded that the eighth season be re-shot.
Bloys addressed why HBO didn't submit the actors, explaining that it was mainly down to the concern that the "Thrones" actors could cancel each other out in the vote. The final season of "Game of Thrones" amassed a record 32 Emmy nominations, among which were three actors in Alfie Allen (Theon Greyjoy), Gwendoline Christie (Brienne of Tarth), and Carice Van Houten (Melisandre) who submitted themselves.
Bloys said that the network's awards expert worked with showrunners from all HBO's series to work out who was going to be submitted, and that when the actors decided to submit themselves HBO "helped them and their representatives do it."” />
In terms of HBO's input into the final season, Bloys said that contact between the network and showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss was "minimal."
"When a show is in its sixth, seventh or eighth season, by that point there’s usually a rhythm between showrunners and the network as to what they expect," Bloys said.

In an interview with with Leonard and Jessie Maltin on the podcast "Maltin on Movies," Martin said he doesn't expect the success of "Game of Thrones" to be replicated. “The scale of ‘Game of Thrones’s’ success has — reaching all over the world and invading the culture to [such an extent] — it’s not something anyone could ever anticipate, not something I expect to ever experience again.”” />
George R.R. Martin has some answers for the lingering questions facing viewers about what to expect from the upcoming "Game of Thrones" prequel series.
Martin said the show would have a similar ensemble format to that of its predecessor.
Martin said, "If you go back further, then there are nine kingdoms, and 12 kingdoms, and eventually you get back to where there are a hundred kingdoms — petty kingdoms — and that’s the era we’re talking about here.” In the original series, seven kingdoms vie for the Iron Throne, but the show's successor will see a kingdom count that runs many orders higher.
The author also confirmed the presence of non-human denizens of Westeros including mammoths, direwolves and White Walkers — no dragons, however.
“That would be pretty good.” The show's title is still under wraps, but Martin has some ideas, like "The Long Night." He remains open to other names, however: “I heard a suggestion that it could be called 'The Longest Night,' which is a variant I wouldn’t mind,” he said.
The show is set roughly 5,000 years before the events of "Game of Thrones" in an era known as "The Golden Age of Heroes."
"The Lannisters aren’t there yet, but Casterly Rock is certainly there." "The Starks will definitely be there," he said.
Martin, author of the "Game of Thrones" source novels, provided a few insights into Jane Goldman's prequel pilot in an interview with Entertainment Weekly.
We don’t have leads so much as a large ensemble cast.” Naomi Watts, Miranda Richardson, Naromi Ackie and Denise Gough are among the ensemble cast announced by HBO. “For 'Game of Thrones,' we never even nominated anybody for lead actress or lead actor until recently. It was always for supporting [categories] because the show is such an ensemble." He continued, "I think that will be true for this show too.
Martin revealed which of the beloved family lines will be around millennia ago and which are left out.

However, just as she is getting to grips with the consequences of this enormous revelation, Jon is saved by the horn.
SPOILER ALERT: Do not keep reading unless you’ve seen “Game of Thrones” Season 8 Episode 2, titled “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms.”
The most recent episode of the show, “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms," was Cogman's last as a writer, and he says he "couldn't think of a more beautiful episode to go out on."
Cogman reveals that when he submitted his first draft of the episode it came back from showrunners David Benioff and D. Weiss covered in red pen, which is when he realized the magnitude of the episode and how much work there was to do. B.
"It’s been a beautifully cathartic thing re-watching the series recently, it’s been ten years of my life.” "This is it for me in terms of Westeros," Cogman told Variety.
“If you’re Jon and Dany, you’re probably the only two in that castle who are glad that the White Walkers just showed up. He would be saying to her, ‘OK, good talk let’s go, the end of the world is here, phew,’” jokes Cogman
"David and Dan were pretty adamant, kicking ideas around in the writer’s room, that it not be on a hill at sunrise with their capes billowing in the wind," Cogman says. "We wanted it to be the antithesis of that and subvert that trope.”
Cogman signed an overall deal with Amazon last year, where he will now focus his attention. HBO ordered the show being developed by Goldman to pilot in June, 2018.” /> He was one of one of five writers, along with Max Borenstein, Jane Goldman, Brian Helgeland and Carly Wray,  chosen to develop a new show in the “Game of Thrones” universe.
Eventually Cogman managed to wrangle the complicated script together, and he also adds that he and the showrunners had been "working towards" the heart-melting scene in which Jaime Lannister knights Brienne of Tarth "for quite some time."
In the episode, Daenerys and Jon are interrupted in the middle of a rather important conversation. Jon had just told her that his real name is in fact Aegon Targaryen, and that therefore he is the rightful heir to the Iron Throne and, seemingly less important to Dany, her nephew.
“It was a sea of red like blood dripping from my soul because it was a mess and they were right,” he says. “It was a lot of talking about stuff that had happened and asking questions the audience already knows.”
Veteran "Game of Thrones" writer Bryan Cogman has confirmed that his potential spinoff series from the HBO epic will not be going ahead.