Pakula from his adaptation of the John Grisham novel. Washington and Roberts previously collaborated on the 1993 legal thriller "The Pelican Brief," directed by Alan J.
Roberts will play the mother of the family that rents a house and Washington will portray the homeowner. "Leave the World Behind" is a story about two families, strangers to each other, who are forced together on a long weekend gone terribly wrong.
Sam Esmail, whose credits include "Mr. Netflix has landed feature film rights to the novel, and the deal is believed to be a blockbuster payday for the two A-list stars. Robot" and "Homecoming" (on which he worked with Roberts), is attached to direct from his own adapted script.
Alam is an executive producer. Washington is producing along with Roberts through her Red Om Films banner and Esmail and Chad Hamilton through Esmail Corp. Red Om’s Lisa Gillan and Marisa Yeres Gill will also be involved in a producorial capacity.
The story explores the complexities of parenthood, race, and class — along with how our closest bonds are reshaped in moments of crisis. "Leave the World Behind" will be published by Ecco this October.
Roberts is represented by CAA and Hirsch Wallerstein Hayum Matlof + Fishman. Washington is also producing Netflix’s upcoming "Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom." He is represented by WME and Hansen Jacobson. Alam is represented by CAA and Julia Barer at The Book Group. Esmail is represented by CAA and McKuin Frankel Whitehead. The news was first reported by Deadline Hollywood.” />
Denzel Washington and Julia Roberts have signed on to star in the family drama "Leave the World Behind," based on the upcoming Rumaan Alam novel.

But, she continued, "It was weird — it was like the harder the task, the faster we accomplished it. It was very strange."
However, the show still posed new challenges for the veteran actress — specifically an 11-page scene that was filmed as one continuously, traveling shot.
And you put that in Sam [Esmail's] incredibly stylish, capable, huge hands, it seemed a very safe place to be," she said at the Television Critics Assn. panel for the series Saturday. "I just think that what Eli and Micah have written is such a great old-fashioned yarn set in this really modern conundrum of a morality play.
Roberts admitted she wasn't specifically looking for a return to television when "Homecoming" came up for her.
The recent star of "Money Monster" and "Wonder" noted that the process of filming "Homecoming" wasn't "that different" from the way she has been asked to work on films, based on the way they shot it and the fact that Esmail directed all of the episodes.
"We were all together in the way you would be on a movie," she said.
But more seriously, she noted that while having "more time to shoot and more time to unravel people" seemed like a great opportunity, she also doesn't see a big distinction between the mediums today.
Julia Roberts is returning to the small screen for the first time since the 2014 tv movie "The Normal Heart" in "Homecoming," Amazon's new thriller based on Micah Bloomberg and Eli Horowitz's podcast of the same name. And what brought her back to the medium were the men behind the project.
We're like a delivery service — we're delivering entertainment into your homes," she said.” /> "Everything is just so good, the bar is just so high, and for me it's just nice to bring something into people's homes.
"It's about being prepared while walking up and down flights of stairs…on the phone." The "oner" took seven or eight takes, and Roberts said "likely me tripping" caused the need for multiple takes. But she also had a lot of props with which to contend. "It's not just about, can you be prepared?" she pointed out.
"It was a great mental challenge every day," she said, noting that is what she loved about the project. "It became really the fuel a lot of times — how many pages are we going to do tomorrow and is it one shot for all of them or are we going to do a couple of shots?"
"I guess I didn't really think of it as small screen, big screen. I don't know — my television is big," she said.

"We’re at a crossroads in our human culture, I believe," Winfrey said. … This is how you get woke."” /> "I don't feel like this is such a terrible time. We needed this time to literally wake us up.
Oprah Winfrey didn't want to throw "just another book party," especially when it came to a celebration for her latest effort, "Wisdom of Sundays," a collection of what she calls her "a-ha moments" from her conversations with thought-leaders and writers from OWN's "Super Soul Sunday."
"Bringing people to my home is what I decided to do." "Whenever I really believe that something I'm doing is going to be impactful, I try to put everything I have into making that possible," she said.
"I wanted to do something uplifting," Winfrey said. "I wanted to do something that launches this book into the world in a way that leaves the people who are a part of it — all the 'Super Soul' guests, friends of mine — to come to gather and spread the word and message of this book."
The brunch, which was designed by Colin Cowie and catered by chef Art Smith, featured fried chicken and waffles, traditional Southern sides like collard greens and mac and cheese, biscuits and gravy, as well as a raw bar and plenty of vegan options.
Winfrey made clear she won't be taking any proceeds from the book, which goes on sale Tuesday, donating all the money to charitable causes, including her Leadership Academy for Girls.
Winfrey told the audience, "it's going to get real in the gospel section," as she turned over the stage to Bebe Winans, who led a rousing, hourlong gospel concert, with performances by Andra Day, Common, Yolanda Adams, Erica Campbell, and Emily David, a survivor of Hurricane Harvey — and former "America's Got Talent" contestant who lost everything in the disaster.
"Everything in this book comes from the spirit of what I've been trying to do here on the planet Earth since I recognized that I had a calling," she said. "It's sharing wisdom in a way that opens people up to the best of themselves, to the heart of themselves, to a more purposeful life — a life that allows you to literally get woke and stay woke."
So on Sunday, she welcomed 250 guests to her sprawling, 65-acre estate in Montecito, Calif., for a gospel brunch. Brown, Chrissy Metz, Ava DuVernay, Shonda Rhimes, Angela Bassett, Jon Bon Jovi, Kerry Washington, along with many "Super Soul" contributors. "It's not often that I open up this space," she told the A-list crowd, which included Julia Roberts, Reese Witherspoon, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Alicia Keys, Mindy Kaling, Sterling K. Execs in attendance included Bob Iger, Jeff Bezos, Ted Sarandos, and Peter Roth, as well as Mark Burnett and Roma Downey, George Lucas, David Foster, Barry Diller, and Diane von Furstenberg.