Howard Hunt (Harrelson) and G. The five-episode series tells the story of how President Nixon’s own political saboteurs and Watergate masterminds, E. Headey joins previously announced cast members Woody Harrelson, Justin Theroux, and Domhnall Gleeson. Gordon Liddy (Theroux), accidentally toppled the Presidency they were zealously trying to protect.
She is also known for her starring roles in shows like "Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles" and in films like "300," "Fighting with My Family," and "Dredd." She is best known for playing Cersei Lannister in the premium cabler's megahit fantasy drama series "Game of Thrones." Her time on the show earned her five Emmy nominations as well as a Golden Globe nomination. The show brings Headey back into the HBO fold.
She is repped by CAA, TMT Entertainment Group, and Kraditor & Haber.
Howard Hunt. A mother of four and active CIA asset, Dorothy tries to hold her family together while entangling herself in her husband’s catastrophic misadventures. Headey will star as Dorothy Hunt, the wife of E.
“Veep” writers and executive producers Alex Gregory and Peter Huyck created the series and will executive produce. Mandel is currently under an overall deal at HBO.” /> Ruben Fleischer and David Bernad will executive produce for The District along with Paul Lee, Nne Ebong and Mark Roybal for wiip. “Succession” executive producer Frank Rich will also executive produce, as will Gregg Fienberg. “Veep” showrunner David Mandel will executive produce and direct all five episodes. Harrelson and Theroux will executive produce in addition to starring. The series will be a co-production between HBO and wiip.
Lena Headey has joined the HBO series "The White House Plumbers," which delves into the Watergate scandal, Variety has learned.

In bizarre and outlandish sketches — set on a thrown-together game show, in a focus group overtaken by petty social competition, or in a house entirely decorated with "Garfield"-themed furniture — Robinson follows his particular fixation with socially thwarted characters, often men whose free-floating anger makes them ultimately pathetic, to terminuses far from where each sketch began. The comedian Tim Robinson's new Netflix series, "I Think You Should Leave," was an instant standout when it debuted last week.
While some notes were likely given throughout these shows' development processes, the key to their artistic success is that it never feels like there were. All of these programs don't just thrive on oddity (that alone, on the medium that gave us "Mr. Their shared trait is an outright refusal to compromise, a seeming headlong sprint away from what would make them a potentially broad consensus hit. Show" and "Arrested Development," and, more recently, "Atlanta" and "Barry," is hardly new). Those are less thrilling shows, even if they'd seem to fit into the TV landscape more comfortably. It's easy to imagine the "Russian Doll" with a tidier explication of its universe's rules, or a "Pen15" in which charismatic child stars rather than loose-limbed and loopy adults play the leads, or the "Other Two" with one fewer Debra Messing in-joke.
The best shows of the year so far have tended to be comedies that feel like the culmination of a vision that came to air with little network interference, shows that are so flamboyantly themselves that they go farther than alienating some portion of the audience: They're proudly niche. And, in another sense, it's part of a growing trend. In today's TV landscape, "I Think You Should Leave" is one-of-a-kind.
When you're a person who likes "Pen15" or "I Think You Should Leave," it feels as though it was made for you. All of these shows, anecdotally (as we'll never know viewership numbers for the three streaming series), have found fans for whom their unwillingness to try to appeal to anyone not on their level matters. And in an especially fickle time for the TV audience, even a small fan base matters.” /> It's a lesson that TV-makers, at the writing and at the corporate levels, could take: The rewards for minting a broadly appealing hit, insofar as the TV infrastructure even supports such a thing still, are huge. But hewing to a vision, even one that threatens to cut off some segment of the audience, will keep at least a petite fan army loyal.
Or Hulu's "Pen15," the best show of the year so far, whose oddball central choice — casting its two adult creators as young teens, and then surrounding them with child performers playing their contemporaries — opens up strange and painful insights about the middle-school experience to those willing to stay with the show. Consider, for instance, Comedy Central's "The Other Two," a show so granular in its understanding of how fame is manufactured and so obsessive in its references that its potential fan base is limited to people with a working knowledge of Justin Bieber's music and Justin Theroux's persona. Or Netflix's "Russian Doll," whose experimentation with format, philosophical musings, and voraciously performed lead character inhibit casual viewing while glancing at Facebook; it's a comedy that coexists with "Friends" and "The Office" reruns on the streamer but that seems like their diametrical opposite as regards ease of consumption.
Shows don't need to be broad to thrive on streaming platforms — a fact that has in some ways sucked a bit of fun out of the TV-watching experience, as basically no streaming show is watched by its group of fans at the same pace or at the same time, making conversation hard but not impossible. They're small, with their specificities emerging out of character: Two girls dealing with social incidents at school, a pair of twins metabolizing family trauma and success, a woman fighting for life and figuring out who she is and what she needs, a whole set of lost and confused Robinson creations. When you're tuned to their frequency, though, these little stories feel massive in their accumulation of specific, true detail. All of these shows, unlike the equally odd "Atlanta" and "Barry," notably don't feel ambitious to diagnose the modern condition or to tell stories of operatic sweep; unlike shows including "BoJack Horseman," they don't feel studied in their strangeness. But the conversation that still managed to spring up around streaming series "Pen15" (renewed today by Hulu), "Russian Doll," and "I Think You Should Leave," as well as around "The Other Two," which airs on a linear network but feels infused with a streaming-era sensibility, proves what the changes in TV over the past half-decade or so have given us, too.
Indeed, they stand as evidence of the sort of comedy that's possible when one doesn't have to fulfill "SNL's" mandate of broadly acceptable, widely understandable comedy. So too would an "I Think You Should Leave" that feels less knotty and rageful and more like, well, "Saturday Night Live." Notably, all of these shows have the NBC sketch show somewhere in their DNA; Robinson has written and appeared on the program, "The Other Two" was created by former head writers Chris Kelly and Sarah Schneider, and "Russian Doll" and "Pen15" were produced by, among others, Amy Poehler and Andy Samberg, respectively. But given that these shows make the proudly quirky "SNL"-alum sitcom "30 Rock" feel fairly conventional by comparison, it's hard to sort these shows within the Lorne Michaels diaspora.

The episode was also one of many where viewers got to see a lot — truly a lot — of star Theroux's physique.
On this edition of the podcast, Morales discusses "The Leftovers," directing for the Duplass brothers, how she's making history with "Abby's," and even why Cardi B should star in a reboot of "The Nanny." Listen below:
"I thought about how much happiness and open mindedness TV and movies brought to my life," she said. I think 'Will & Grace' had such a big effect on how people viewed the LGBTQ world when it came out. I think it's a weird machine. So I'm happy when people tell me they've seen my work and they like it because I've affected them… "I've been introduced to things that I would never know because of television. Movies and TV can do a lot for the world.
Variety's “My Favorite Episode With Michael Schneider” is where stars and producers gather to discuss their favorite TV episodes ever — from classic sitcoms to modern-day dramas — as well as pick a favorite episode from their own series. On "My Favorite Episode," some of the biggest names in TV share their creative inspirations — and how those episodes influenced them.
The show, from creator Josh Malmuth and executive producer Mike Schur, is the first ever multi-camera sitcom with a studio audience to completely shoot outdoors, on a real backyard stage. It's also believed to be the first network show with a Cuban lead since Desi Arnaz. On "Abby's," Morales plays the owner of an unlicensed backyard bar that attracts a vibrant local crowd in a San Diego neighborhood.
Before "Abby's," Morales developed a following from series such as "The Middleman" and "Parks and Recreation," as well as gone-too-soon series like "Trophy Wife" and "The Grinder."
That's what I don't like about it. "But it's the terrible machine of fame that has been created to take money from people and make them feel like they're not good enough, or they should be like these other people. I'm just a person who likes to play pretend." "You could be a fan, appreciate someone's work," she added.
"It was one of my favorite shows to watch," she said. It can be whatever we want it to be, it doesn't matter. I loved what that show was doing for the TV format. It was like, no, why does it need to be what you think it should be? 'International Assassin' is definitely one of those episodes, it's so metaphorical in so many ways." "There are all of these amazing beats on that show that are so good.
Natalie Morales' character on the new NBC sitcom "Abby's" is believed to be the first bisexual lead on a primetime sitcom. But Morales notes that it's not the character's defining characteristic.
There are a lot of well-meaning white people who try to tell stories that are not theirs, so why not just write a character and cast whoever is the best person for it? "It's one of the many things about her but it doesn't define our show," she told Variety's "My Favorite Episode" podcast. "I've been really lucky in my acting career thus far, my characters have just happened to be Latina, they're never about that. While we need representation in general in many fields I happen to belong to some of, it does annoy me that a lot of the time when we get representation it's given to us by people who are trying to fill a category.
Or is it Patti? In the episode, Kevin, played by Justin Theroux, finds himself in a hotel that is a bit of a purgatory, and he discovers he has chosen the role of international assassin — tasked with assassinating Patti Levin, who in this realm is a presidential candidate.
"It comes from that Eminem song. But get a life, don't be a stan of somebody!" Meanwhile, Morales admits she's not a fan of the term "stan." "It's literally an amalgamation of 'stalker' and 'fan,'" she said.
Written by Nick Cuse and executive producer Damon Lindelof and directed by Craig Zobel, the "Leftovers" episode "International Assassin" was a key episode for the series, and aired Season 2 on November 22, 2015.
For Morales, "The Leftovers" was a show that she never let pile up on her DVR, as she was compelled by the show's unique take on life, death, metaphysics, relationships and more. She also loved how quirky the show could get — referencing the Wu Tang Clan and obsessing over "Perfect Strangers" to the degree that Mark-Linn Baker even appeared as himself.
She's also quite simply a fan of good storytelling, which is why "The Leftovers" is on top of her list of favorite TV series. And her favorite episode is "International Assassin," from Season 2.
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The star of NBC's new sitcom "Abby's," Morales told Variety's "My Favorite Podcast" that she appreciates fans, and is a fan of plenty of things herself. But the fan/star relationship, she admitted, is an odd one.
As much as we do need stories that explain why we've been oppressed, we also need so much more of 'hey this is a regular person in a regular life.'" "Maybe they're black, maybe they're Latina, maybe they're Asian. "It doesn't define the character, which we need more of. I've been lucky in my career to play roles of people who happen to look like me but it's not about how I'm oppressed or about my other-ness," she added.
"I think Justin Theroux is interesting to watch despite how good looking he is," Morales said. And it doesn't get in the way of me buying any of his acting or what's going on, which is nice. He's so good in that whole series." I forgive Justin Theroux for how incredible he looks at the moment. "There was a lot of Justin Theroux in that episode, which I'm not complaining about!

That opening would be a head start on Kate McKinnon's previous comedy, "Rough Night," which launched with $8 million. Meanwhile, Lionsgate and Imagine's "The Spy Who Dumped Me" is shooting for a release between $10 million and $15 million. It went on to earn $47 million worldwide on a $20 million budget.
"Christoper Robin," Disney's live-action adaptation based on the characters from Winnie the Pooh, hopes to tap into nostalgia when it opens on 3,500 screens. He reunites with his stuffed friends — including Tigger, Eeyore, and Piglet — who help him find his way. Ewan McGregor plays an adult version of Winnie the Pooh's old pal Christopher Robin, who is now a businessman who has lost his sense of imagination. The cast also includes Hayley Atwell, Bronte Carmichael, and Mark Gatiss. Jim Cummings, the original voice behind Winnie the Pooh and Tigger, returns, and Brad Garrett voices Eeyore. Marc Forster directed from a screenplay by Alex Ross Perry and Allison Schroeder.
In "The Spy Who Dumped Me," Mila Kunis and McKinnon portray two best friends who get chased through Europe by assassins after they unwittingly get caught up in an international conspiracy when one finds out the boyfriend who dumped her works for the CIA. (You know, that old story.) Susanna Fogel directed and co-wrote with David Iserson, while Justin Theroux, Gillian Anderson, Hasan Minhaj, and Sam Heughan round out the cast.
1. Should the latest chapter have a similar hold, the spy thriller could surpass "Christopher Robin" and take the No. slot. "Fallout's" predecessor, "Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation" only dropped 48% in its second weekend. Last weekend, the sixth installment of the "Mission: Impossible" franchise opened with a series-best $61.2 million.
The stoner comedy, which debuted at the Sundance Film Festival, stars Mia Mitchell, Camila Morrone and "Saturday Night Live's" Kyle Mooney.” /> Another A24 title, "Never Goin' Back," is also opening at the specialty box office.
Finally, Dinesh D'Souza's controversial documentary "Death of a Nation" is aiming for $3 million. In his review for Variety, Owen Gleiberman says, "Dinesh D'Souza goes over the top — of hate, and of truth — in his latest documentary, a radical-right screed that equates liberalism with Nazism." It's been a strong summer at the box office for documentaries, though acclaimed titles "Won't You Be My Neighbor," "RBG," and "Three Identical Strangers" have opted for themes of encouragement and sincerity.
After a supercharged few months, the end of popcorn season is approaching.
Prior to that, "Hillary's America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party" made $13 million. D'Souza's last movie was "2016 Obama's America," which topped out with $33 million.
It will need to pick up steam in its theatrical run to justify its $34 million price tag. Fox's young adult sci-fi thriller "The Darkest Minds" is hoping to collect around $8 million when it opens on 3,127 screens. Jennifer Yuh Nelson, who had a hand in "Kung Fu Panda" and helmed its two sequels, is making her live-action directorial debut. Chad Hodge penned the script, based on Alexandra Bracken's novel. "The Darkest Minds,"  starring Amandla Stenberg, Mandy Moore and Gwendoline Christie, follows a group of teenagers who are on the run from the government after mysteriously getting superpowers.
The final wide releases are each aiming for single digit debuts.
Elsie Fisher stars in the coming-of-age comedy about a middle schooler navigating her last week of eighth grade. It began its limited run with the best-per-screen average of the year and has since picked up $3.1 million. Elsewhere at the box office, Bo Burnham's "Eighth Grade" is expanding nationwide.
The domestic box office weekend looks to be a battle between Disney's "Christoper Robin" and the sophomore frame of Tom Cruise's "Mission: Impossible – Fallout" as both titles head for three-day totals around $30 million. Newcomer "The Spy Who Dumped Me" is targeting low double-digits.