"Dark Fate" serves as a direct sequel to the two original "Terminator" flicks, disregarding the confusing timelines created in the three middle entries and spinoff series. Even though Hamilton said the script wasn't finished when she signed on, she said seeing how the characters had changed over time in the new storyline ultimately drew her in.
Linda Hamilton has no problem saying hasta la vista to the last three "Terminator" films.
"I am living this quiet, lovely life that doesn't involve being a celebrity, and you really have to think, do I really want to trade that in again for another 15 minutes?" "I gave it probably six weeks of intense thinking and consideration before deciding to do it. I wasn't sure if I wanted to. I didn't want it to look like a shameless money grab," she said.
As for appearing in future "Terminator" entries, Hamilton has a plan, saying. "I'm going to fake my own death so I don't have to do another one."” />
"They're very forgettable, aren't they?" she said to Variety's Marc Malkin at CinemaCon on Thursday.
She originated the role of Sarah Connor in "The Terminator" in 1984 and reprised it in "Terminator 2: Judgement Day" in 1991, but has since only lent her voice to the franchise for "Terminator: Salvation" in 2009. Hamilton helped promote "Terminator: Dark Fate," the sixth entry in the franchise and her return to the series after more than 25 years. While "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines," "Salvation" and "Terminator: Genisys" averaged $275 million at the overseas box office, they were largely ignored by U.S. auds and panned by critics.
"You start something and you're invested in the franchise, but somehow the characters that you care about weren't there. Too many people, too many story points. So I think we've done a good job of narrowing down the focus again so it will echo the first two films," she said.
She also revealed she hesitated at first to return to the series.

A canoodling couple comes to her rescue until police show up to the bizarre scene. Davis springs to action, tossing the cops around like rag dolls and terrorizing her saviors in the process. The reel opened with franchise newcomer Mackenzie Davis, playing a synthetic intelligence machine, falling naked from the sky like the original's star, Arnold Schwarzenegger, did in 1984.
The annual convention of movie theater owners, held in Las Vegas, got a lengthy footage reel from the forthcoming sequel in James Cameron's famous action franchise. What was instantly clear inside the Colosseum Theater was that director Tim Miller is the hero the IP needed.
"One cool new feature, he can split so he's twice as deadly," Miller said, practically jumping up and down.
Before he left the stage, Miller teased an upgrade to the synthetic menaces of this cinematic world: they can multiply.
Her rakish frame is clad simply in a white tank and cargo pants. We also get a hardcore Linda Hamilton cameo here, rocking a motorcycle jacket and shooting off surface-to-air missiles. That's especially true for an actress like Davis, who earned a permanent spot in the queer canon with her acclaimed "San Junipero" episode of "Black Mirror," a love story between the actress' character and Gugu Mbatha-Raw's. Davis rocks a buzzed and angular haircut. The androgyny the character is giving off is a dog whistle to LGBTQ identities, whether Paramount and Skydance Media know it or not.
Luna is not the sole Terminator in this project, as Schwarzenegger does return to stir up some trouble. On more superficial levels, the action sequences inspired cheers in some and breathlessness in others.
The "Deadpool" helmer was so devout to the property that he teared up numerous times and literally stepped out of the spotlight to compose himself, saying, "I think you'll see that passion up on the big screen."
The actor and former California governor said the film changed his life nearly 30 years ago, and gave him endless slogans for political campaigns ("Terminate Global Warming!" he yelled to the audience).
Blunt force and a dash of diversity helped "Terminator: Dark Fate" rise to the top of Paramount Pictures' CinemaCon 2019 presentation on Thursday.
Taking it a step further, the actual terminator is Mexican-American star Gabriel Luna ("Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D."), and Colombian actress Natalia Reyes has a significant supporting role. The latter expressed her gratitude for the inclusive hires, saying it was "the most important part" of the presentation and reflects a changing Hollywood.
1.” /> Miller, Davis, and the rest of the crew invade theaters Nov.