Following the news of legendary director Richard Donner's death, heartfelt tributes are emerging from all over Hollywood, including from Steven Spielberg and Mel Gibson.
Donner, who directed the original "Superman" film, the 1985 classic "The Goonies" and the "Lethal Weapon" series, died on Monday at the age of 91.
Gibson, who starred alongside Danny Glover in Donner's "Lethal Weapon" movies, also shared a statement with Variety mourning the loss of Donner.
He undercut his own talent and greatness with a huge chunk of humility referring to himself as ‘merely a traffic cop.’ He left his ego at the door and required that of others," Gibson said. I will sorely miss him, with all his mischievous wit and wisdom.” /> If we piled up all the good deeds he did, it would stretch to some uncharted place in the firmament. "He was magnanimous of heart and soul, which he liberally gave to all who knew him. “Donner! Oh, the things I learned from him! My friend, my mentor.
Fellow director Spielberg, who wrote the story for "The Goonies," remembered Donner in a statement to Variety.
I can't believe he's gone, but his husky, hearty laugh will stay with me always." Being in his circle was akin to hanging out with your favorite coach, smartest professor, fiercest motivator, most endearing friend, staunchest ally, and – of course — the greatest Goonie of all," Spielberg said. "He was all kid. "Dick had such a powerful command of his movies, and was so gifted across so many genres. All heart. All the time.

Also drawing interest are Michael Polish’s hurricane-set actioner “Force of Nature” with Mel Gibson and Kate Bosworth, and Voltage Pictures’ action-thriller “The Minuteman” with Liam Neeson.
movie business is undergoing a wave of dramatic consolidation. The U.S.
“There aren’t a lot of U.S. distributors, period,” said Martin Moszkowicz, CEO of Constantin Film, the producer of “Resident Evil.”
That means that the number of major studios have shrunk from six to five. Under its new ownership, it is expected to release fewer than six movies annually, roughly half of what it once fielded in a typical year. The independent film world seems to be teetering. Broad Green and Open Road have gone belly up, Annapurna is dialing down its ambitions after a series of flops, and STX and Lionsgate are flailing as they search for new film franchises. Twentieth Century Fox Film has been subsumed into Walt Disney Studios as part of a larger $71.3 billion deal.
It’s expected to be standing room only when Stuart Ford’s AGC Studios unveils Emmerich’s “Moonfall,” which is budgeted at $150 million, in an intimate presentation to buyers on May 15 at the Carlton Hotel. A few films are drawing buyers' attention. AGC Studios’ Michael Rothstein said the film is “in the spirit of ‘2012,’ with Roland wreaking joyful cinematic havoc on our planet as only Roland can.”
“Despite all the uncertainties, it is actually an exciting time if you have capital and access to talent,” added Harold van Lier, at Anton.
“You are certainly not going to see too many flashy big-budget movies being touted, just because the market can't really afford that kind of budget,” said David Garrett, founder of the sales company Mister Smith Entertainment.
If studios do buy domestic rights to a movie, they often want part of international as well, which makes dealmaking more complex. distribution. Until they do ink a U.S. deal, which would guarantee an impactful marketing campaign, many foreign-based distributors will hold off on purchases. Hardly any of even the big movie projects bowing at Cannes have U.S. Buying at Cannes will, as a consequence, almost certainly remain as targeted as the movie projects themselves.
These include Bankside Films’ “Let Me Count the Ways,” with Emilia Clarke as poet Elizabeth Barrett; See-Saw Films' “The Power of the Dog" from director Jane Campion with Benedict Cumberbatch and Elisabeth Moss; and the STX Intl. As for family entertainment, Kate Winslet voices the horse in Constantin’s “Black Beauty" and Mel Gibson plays Santa Claus in Fortitude’s “Fatman.” thriller “I Care a Lot” with Rosamund Pike.
“It’s better than over the last two years in volume, and quality,” said Moszkowicz.
You cannot beat that.”” /> “In a very small place, in very short time, a lot of people with a lot of energy, enthusiasm, ambition and resources come together. “Cannes is unique,” said Rocket Science founder Thorsten Schumacher, the producer and sales agent of the “Cliffhanger” reboot.
Though the Cannes Film Festival is unfolding an ocean and several time zones away from Hollywood, the aftershocks from the mega-mergers and bankruptcies currently roiling the entertainment industries will likely be felt by the executives and agents prowling the Croisette in search of movies to buy. Major studios are being swallowed up and indie players are dropping like flies.
With the U.S. But in a risk-averse environment, many of Cannes higher-profile movies are keeping a tighter rein on costs. market looking dicier, some foreign territories could help plug the gap. Many have budgets below the $20 million to $25 million range. China, for instance, has a growing appetite for science-fiction movies and family fare.
But what the market lacks in sizzle it makes up for in depth. Most of the films for sale aren’t on the level of “355,” a spy thriller with Jessica Chastain and Lupita Nyong’o that captivated buyers at last year's Cannes.
Amazon Studios returned to dealmaking with a vengeance, while Netflix was also active. However, the Berlin Film Festival, unfolding just a few weeks later, was notably slower and smaller when it came to sales. In contrast, this year’s Sundance Film Festival was red hot despite the systemic issues facing the movie business.
But “the number of higher-profile films seems significantly reduced from years past — and there are absolutely (fewer) big-budget films,” said Rothstein.
But these films have to contend with a new reality. There are a smattering of big-budget films on offer, including Roland Emmerich’s epic “Moonfall” and a “Cliffhanger” reboot that will trade Sylvester Stallone for a female protagonist. Those companies that have survived this period of dramatic change won’t find many splashy titles for sale. Hollywood’s studios are taking fewer risks and releasing fewer films.

Hours later, Hart resurfaced with another video stating that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences had given him an ultimatum: Apologize or we’ll find a new host — and that Hart had chosen to pass on the apology. Less than two hours later, Hart announced via Twitter that he was removing himself from the gig, and he finally offered the apology everyone was looking for. Hart's resignation from hosting duties came after a saga of events that kicked into overdrive when, in an Instagram video, Hart refused to apologize for the tweets.
After briefly recapping that Hart stepped down from hosting the Oscars after the 2011 tweets came to light, Che called out the Academy for awarding another controversial Hollywood denizen.
Similarly to Hart, Gibson refused to apologize after a 1991 interview in which he made derogatory comments about homosexuals. "Didn't the Academy nominate Mel Gibson for an award just last year?" Che asked. Gibson, who has repeatedly come under fire since the early '90s for using racist and homophobic epithets, was nominated for an Academy Award for best director for "Hacksaw Ridge" in 2017.
Kevin Hart may have alienated some in Hollywood over his recently resurfaced homophobic tweets, but that didn't stop "Weekend Update" co-host Michael Che from cracking some jokes in support of Hart on Dec. 8's "Saturday Night Live."
Watch the "Weekend Update" segment above.” />
"The only black comic I know that's cleaner than Kevin Hart is booked for the next three to 10 years," he said, as an image of Bill Cosby appeared on the screen, prompting shouts from the audience. "Also, if Kevin Hart isn't clean enough to host the Oscars, then no black comic is," Che remarked.

Either way, as is now Zahler's custom three features into a distinctive oeuvre, we get ample time to ponder these ambiguities. At a whopping 158 minutes, "Concrete's" sleek, languorous anatomy of a heist represents the filmmaker's most extreme exercise yet in painstaking genre deceleration, sparked as ever by the tangy movie-movie vernacular of his writing, the crunchy metal-on-asphalt dynamism of his craftsmanship, and the back-from-the-brink reanimation of his stars.
Unluckily for them — well, for all involved parties, really — it's the same heist that Ridgeman decides to intercept (following a tipoff from a ripe Udo Kier) after he and Lusaretti are both suspended from duty for violent arrest tactics. Initially reluctant but likewise motivated by financial strain, Lusaretti hops along for the ride. And a slow ride it is for what, by heist-movie standards, remains a pretty straightforward scheme: Zahler is less concerned with knotty complications and double- or triple-crossings than he is with simply getting a firm grip on the people involved. Law-keeping is not the objective this time, however; fearing his job may be lost forever, and under pressure from his MS-stricken ex-force wife (Laurie Holden) to move to a safer, more affluent neighborhood, the disgraced cop is simply after the money.
Zahler's film places a lot of these wink-wink reactionary assertions in the mouths of Gibson and Vince Vaughn — noted Hollywood conservatives both, of course — as old-school policemen who run topically afoul of a crackdown on brutality in the force, with personally ruinous consequences. As in his last feature, the pummeling, Vaughn-starring "Brawl in Cell Block 99," it's for viewers to determine whether "Dragged Across Concrete" is complicit in such politics or taking a more ambivalently observational stance: Does it heroize its flawed white male characters for their flawed white maleness, or admonish them via the grimy downward spiral of their narrative?
Seuss. Best of all, Zahler's dialogue is pithy and rhythmic as ever, packed with irresistibly heightened turns of phrase that, at their peak ("It's bad for you, it's bad for me, it's bad like lasagne in a can") sound like the product of caffeinated all-night writer's-room sessions between Quentin Tarantino and Dr. Certain digressions — notably a lengthy domestic interlude on Jennifer Carpenter's bank employee, a new mother loath to return to work on what proves to be very much the wrong day for it — wind up playing as taunting shaggy-dog tales; women get particularly short shrift here, often cruelly dispatched for getting in the middle of the boys' risky business. The sheer fizz of that idiom propels "Concrete" past a lot of distasteful indulgence, but it's still doesn't quite justify lavishing this outsize runtime on such quick-and-dirty potboiler material.
Indeed, the most absorbing sections of "Dragged Across Concrete" are actually its most serenely conversational, as his characters shoot the blue-aired breeze while on stakeouts that stretch languidly across days, or while tailing vehicles in virtual real time on the interstate highway. In these stretches, the film is fat with the sharpest, seamiest stylistic pleasures of Zahler's filmmaking, from the mustardy midnight haze of Benji Bakshi's widescreen lensing to a terrific original song score that improbably matches Zahler's high-kitsch lyrics to the creamy harmonies of revived soul collective The O'Jays.
Sporting an ashy brush cut and a roadkill mustache, he rewards Zahler's trust with his most calmly committed performance since well before the downfall era, even as the script seemingly plays on the most controversial aspects of the star's latter-day public persona. When Ridgeman manhandles the nude Latina girlfriend of a suspect to extract information, pushing her under a cold shower and jeering at her ethnicity, it's a wince-inducing spectacle of art imitating tabloid life. In this case, that chiefly applies to Gibson. His younger partner Lurasetti (Vaughn) is the more temperate and ethically conscious of the two, and even he's a crude, heedless racist — though he dimly insists that ordering "a cup of dark roast every Martin Luther King Day" proves otherwise.
"And it turns out that sh-t's more important than good, honest work." Thirty years on from the bad-cop hijinks of "Lethal Weapon," Gibson's now the one who's too old for said sh-t, though Ridgeman and Murtaugh, Danny Glover's weary detective from that 1987 smash, would probably define the grind of their job very differently. "I don't politick and I don't change with the times," spits Gibson's bent, brusque cop Ridgeman, after being disciplined for using excessive force on a perp. If you're out to criticize "Dragged Across Concrete," the latest supersized exploitation opus from writer-director S. Craig Zahler, on charges of gratuitously provocative violence, misogyny, racial discourse or the mere presence of right-wing firebrand Mel Gibson in the lead, know that the film issues a preemptive retaliation in its own script.
Egged on by that sly, close-to-the-bone casting, the film's self-reflexivity tips too far at points into self-regard. Its sympathies, however, just about hang in the balance, as the upper hand keeps shifting among this sordid convention of losers.” /> Zahler's script has an inbuilt response to those misgivings, too, as its police meatheads rail repeatedly against liberal values they perceive as oppressive: "People react to every perceived intolerance with complete and utter intolerance," Ridgeman fumes between racist rants, before his superior (a sighing, grizzled Don Johnson) cautions him against losing "perspective and compassion." Is the film on the boss's side, or in tacit, dog-whistling sync with the cop's lament?
Developed in parallel with, if a little less generously than, the cops' story is that of African-American career criminal Henry (a laconic, charismatic Tory Kittles), who has no sooner been released from a lengthy prison spell than he's roped into another underworld job by his childhood pal Biscuit (Michael Jai White). Craig Zahler film, where blasted body parts and grand jet-sprays of cherry-cola blood are very much part of the deal. (Zahler positively revels in such clichés of crime-film plotting, the basic hubs around which his less orthodox genre mechanics spin.) Together, the men agree to serve as getaway drivers for a large-scale bank robbery masterminded by the ruthless Vogelmann (Thomas Kretschmann), with the agreement that no one will get killed unless in self-defense. That's the falsest of pinky swears in an S.