Andrew Cuomo has allowed groups of 10 people to gather anywhere in the state. Going into Memorial Day weekend, New York Gov.


Cuomo maintained that the number was still "a tragedy, no doubt," but noted that the downward trend in fatalities was a good sign.
The new ruling comes after the New York Civil Liberties Union filed a suit against Cuomo's previous order on Thursday that only allowed 10-person gatherings for religious services and Memorial Day events.
In an executive order issued on Friday night, Cuomo loosened the state's coronavirus restrictions, saying 10-person gatherings can happen “for any lawful purpose or reason” as long as social distancing rules are still being followed.
“The fact that it is down as low as it is, is really overall good news,” he said. “In my head, I was always looking to get under 100. It’s a sign of real progress.”” />
Levine, Upper Manhattan councilman and chairman of the City Council's health committee. However, the less restrictive guidelines were criticized by some people, including Mark D.
"We need the public to continue to be smart and use judgement about the risks of this virus, regardless of what the court has forced on us." "This shocking order, forced by a lawsuit, changes nothing about the risks associated with group gatherings — especially those held indoors," Levine said on Twitter.
"No one should interpret this as advice to change their behavior," he added in another tweet.
Also in his Saturday briefing, Cuomo announced that New York recorded fewer than 100 coronavirus deaths for the first time since late March. The governor reported 84 new deaths from COVID-19, the lowest number in a single day since March 24.

Disney distribution chief Cathleen Taff told Variety that she's particularly pleased that "Aladdin" has racked up a 93% audience score on Rotten Tomatoes and an "A" Cinemascore. The site recently revised its scoring in that measurement to limit responses to verified ticket buyers.
"Aladdin" has outperformed Disney's pre-opening domestic projections, which were in the $75 million to $85 million range, taking in $86.1 million in its first three days. Guy Ritchie directed "Aladdin," produced by Dan Lin and Jonathan Eirich. The reboot of the original 1992 animated movie — which generated $502 million in worldwide box office — stars Mena Massoud as Aladdin, Will Smith as the Genie, Naomi Scott as Jasmine and Marwan Kenzari as Jafar.
"'Aladdin' is performing exactly the way we were hoping," Taff added. "We should see strong performance in the coming weeks as we get into the summer season."
The family adventure will finish the weekend at the $120 million mark in North America. Warner Bros.' third weekend of "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" will follow in fourth with about $17 million.
Comscore estimated that total domestic business for the four-day weekend was $226 million. That was about $1.8 million shy of the total for the same frame last year, when "Solo: A Star Wars Story" launched with $103 million. The top Memorial Day weekend took place in 2013 when "Fast and Furious 6" launched and North American moviegoing totaled $314 million for the four days.
"Aladdin" is the third biggest launch of 2019, following the record-setting $357 million for "Avengers: Endgame" and $153 million for "Captain Marvel."
"Aladdin" is also dominating moviegoing internationally with $121 million in 56 markets. It's the sixth-highest Memorial Day weekend total ever, topping the 2011 mark of $103.4 million for "The Hangover Part II." The top total came in 2007, when "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End" took in $139 million in its first four days.
The lag is due to a dismal performance during the first two months of this year. Overall moviegoing for 2019 has hit $4.34 billion as of Sunday, down 10% from the same point last year.
"A very solid Memorial Day weekend was led by the bigger-than-expected performance of Disney's 'Aladdin' conjured up huge numbers of moviegoers looking for the perfect family-friendly treat over the extended holiday weekend," he said.
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"A very strong 22% said they would see the film again in theatres — much higher than the norm of 14%," noted Paul Dergarabedian, Comscore's senior media analyst.
Notably, 39% said their affection for the original was their primary reason for seeing the film, a high percentage that reflects moviegoers' love for the "Aladdin" brand and the characters in the film. Comscore’s PostTrak general audience survey found that 67% of patrons said they would "definitely recommend" the film to their friends.
The actioner will wind up the holiday weekend with $107 million domestically. Lionsgate's second session of "John Wick: Chapter 3" should be runner-up with $30.5 million following its surprisingly strong opening of $56.8 million.
Disney's live-action "Aladdin" is flying high with an estimated $105 million in North America during the four-day Memorial Day holiday weekend.
Both were positioned as counter-programmers to "Aladdin" and finished slightly below forecasts. Sony's launch of horror-thriller "Brightburn" should pull in about $9 million for the holiday weekend to finish fifth and United Artists-Annapurna's teen comedy "Booksmart" will open in sixth at around $8 million.
Disney's fifth frame of "Avengers: Endgame" will finish third in the $22 million range, increasing its haul to about $803 million domestically by the end of Memorial Day. "Endgame" trails only "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" in domestic gross, with the space saga having grossed $936 million.

Disney's fifth frame of "Avengers: Endgame" will finish third in the $20 million range, increasing its haul to about $802 million domestically by the end of Memorial Day. "Endgame" trails only "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" in domestic gross, with the space saga having grossed $936 million.
"Aladdin" is produced by Dan Lin and Jonathan Ehrich. Variety's Peter Debruge called it a "mostly rewarding live-action remake." The film has generated mixed reviews from critics, earning a 60% score on Rotten Tomatoes.
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Kaitlyn Dever and Beanie Feldstein star as academic prodigies who cut loose the night before their high school graduation. "Booksmart" has been a critical favorite since premiering at South by Southwest in March, with a 99% score on Rotten Tomatoes. Annapurna and United Artists Releasing are opening coming-of-age comedy "Booksmart," which appears to be slighly below expectations, which had ranged between $10 million to $16 million from 2,505 locations over the four-day frame.
The actioner will wind up the holiday weekend with more than $100 million domestically. Lionsgate's second session of "John Wick: Chapter 3" should be runner-up with at about $27 million following its surprisingly strong opening of $56.8 million.
Disney's live-action "Aladdin" is heading for at least $100 million in North America during the four-day Memorial Day holiday weekend, early estimates showed Friday.
Warner Bros.' third weekend of "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" will likely follow in fourth with about $17 million. The family adventure will wind up the weekend at the $120 million mark in North America.
The original 1992 animated movie, with Robin Williams as the Genie, grossed a massive $502 million globally and won two Oscars. Guy Ritchie directed the reboot, starring Mena Massoud as Aladdin, Will Smith as the Genie, Naomi Scott as Jasmine and Marwan Kenzari as Jafar.
Dunn, Matt Jones and Meredith Hagner star in the story of a young alien who crash-lands on earth and realizes he has superpowers. Sony Pictures is launching "Brightburn," an R-rated superhero horror-thriller produced by "Guardians of the Galaxy" director James Gunn. It appears to be coming in at the low end of forecasts, which had been in the $10 million to $12 million range at 2,607 screens during its first four days in theaters. Sony/Screen Gems and the H Collective spent $6 million to produce "Brightburn." Elizabeth Banks, David Denman, Jackson A.
The top total came in 2007, when "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End" took in $139 million in its first four days. If forecasts hold, "Aladdin" would be the eighth movie to top the $100 million mark in North America over the Memorial Day holiday.
Prior to opening, "Aladdin" has been pegged to gross between $75 million and $85 million at about 4,400 sites over the four-day weekend. Disney's guidance as of mid-day Friday was for a more conservative estimate of an $80 million to $90 million launch while one rival pegged the opening at $105 million.
"Aladdin" will likely finish Friday with around $30 million, including $7 million in Thursday night previews. Sony's launch of horror-thriller "Brightburn" should pull in about $10 million for the holiday weekend and United Artists-Annapurna's comedy "Booksmart" will open at around $9 million.
Last year's holiday frame was led by "Solo: A Star Wars Story," which opened with $102 million with the total domestic box office hitting $228 million. The top Memorial Day weekend took place in 2013 when "Fast and Furious 6" launched and total North American moviegoing totaled $314 million for the four days.

Pitt is also producing with Plan B partners Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner and RT Features’ Rodrigo Teixeira, Keep Your Head Productions’ Anthony Katagas, and Gray.
Gray began shooting the movie in 2017 and said the film would resemble Joseph Conrad’s “Heart of Darkness.” Gray’s directing credits include "The Lost City of Z," “Little Odessa,” “We Own the Night,” “Two Lovers” and “The Immigrant.” The news was first reported by IndieWire.” />
James Gray directed “Ad Astra” from a script he co-wrote with Ethan Gross. Regency Enterprises and Fox produced in association with Bona Film Investment Company, which will distribute in China.
Disney distribution head Cathleen Taff told exhibitors last month at the CinemaCon convention that the studio would be moving around distribution dates on some of its titles. The studio had no comment Thursday.
Tommy Lee Jones, Ruth Negga, Jamie Kennedy, and Donald Sutherland are also starring in “Ad Astra.” Pitt is playing a man who journeys across the solar system in search of his missing father, a dangerous renegade scientist. Jones is portraying the father.
Brad Pitt’s science-fiction adventure movie “Ad Astra” has quietly vanished from the release schedule, three weeks prior to its previously announced May 24 opening date.
Pitt is expected to be at the Cannes Film Festival for the premiere of Quentin Tarantino's "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood," in which he co-stars with Leonardo DiCaprio. The screening will likely be on May 21, the 20th anniversary of "Pulp Fiction."
11, 2019, then decided in late 2018 to move it back four months to the Memorial Day weekend on May 24. Disney closed the deal for the 20th Century Fox film assets in March and has not done any promotion for the movie since then — no trailer or stills have been released. Fox had originally dated "Ad Astra" for Jan. "Ad Astra" was not included in early tracking numbers released Thursday for the Memorial Day period, expected to be dominated by Disney's live-action "Aladdin."

Disney-Lucasfilm's "Solo: A Star Wars Story" is flying well below forecasts, heading for a Memorial Day weekend launch of around $110 million domestically, early estimates showed Friday.
Paramount's second weekend of the comedy "Book Club" is pegged for fourth place with around $10 million to $12 million, followed by Melissa McCarthy's "Life of the Party" at about $6 million.
"Solo" is the second of the "Star Wars" anthology films, which are being spun off as origin stories, following "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story," which launched domestically with $155 million in December 2016, on its way to $532 million in North America and $1 billion globally. Disney and Lucasfilm are also developing spinoffs for Boba Fett and Obi-Wan Kenobi.
"Solo" will represent an improvement on the 2017 Memorial Day weekend, which was led by Disney's "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales" launching domestically with $78.5 million, while overall business totaled $181 million.
A trio of films are opening in limited release — IFC's "Feral," IFC's "Mary Shelley" starring Elle Fanning, and A24's "How to Talk to Girls at Parties."
The Marvel superhero vehicle became the eighth film to top $600 million domestically on May 22. Disney's fifth weekend of "Avengers: Infinity War" should remain a draw in third place over the Memorial Day weekend with around $20 million.
The performance by "Solo," Disney's second spinoff from the "Star Wars" franchise, may have also been muted by the strong ongoing attraction from Ryan Reynolds' "Deadpool 2." Fox's superhero spoof is heading for a second weekend in the $55 million range for the four days — which will give the sequel around $220 million for its first 11 days.
"Solo" is the 10th Star Wars movie and fourth from Disney in less than four years. Critics have been mostly positive with a current 70% "fresh" score on Rotten Tomatoes for "Solo: A Star Wars Story."
Disney's 2007 release "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End" currently holds that title with $139.8 million, followed by "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of Crystal Skull," "X-Men: The Last Stand," "Fast and Furious 6," and "X-Men: Days of Future Past." At $110 million, "Solo" would be only the sixth-biggest film to open on Memorial Day weekend.
Abrams directing as a sequel to "Star Wars: The Last Jedi." It's set for a Dec. 19, 2019, release date. Disney is in pre-production on "Star Wars: Episode IX" with J.J.
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Howard replaced the directing team of Phil Lord and Chris Miller, who left the project in June, citing "creative differences." Emilia Clarke, Woody Harrelson, Thandie Newton, Paul Bettany, Joonas Suotamo, and Phoebe Waller-Bridge round out the cast. Ron Howard directed from a screenplay by Jonathan and Lawrence Kasdan. "Solo" follows Alden Ehrenreich as a young Han Solo, who befriends his future co-pilot and Wookiee companion Chewbacca, and meets the gambler Lando Calrissian (Donald Glover) in the standalone movie.
First-day grosses are coming in at about $32 million — including $14.1 million from previews, which set a Memorial Day weekend record. The four-day figure is significantly under the studio's recent estimates in the $130 million to $150 million range at 4,380 North American locations.
Should the holiday estimate hold for "Solo: A Star Wars Story," it will raise questions about franchise fatigue and Disney's strategy of opening the tentpole a mere five months after "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" debuted on Dec. 16. "The Last Jedi" debuted impressively with $220 million in North America, and went on to earn $620 million domestically and $1.3 billion worldwide.