Up until Sunday's episode of "Game of Thrones," the Night King had never said a word and the show never fully explained his motivations.
Was Maisie the actor you were closest to on set?
This character made your face infamous around the world.
Exactly.
Yes, Maisie was one of the first ladies who knew who I am, because many of the actors didn’t know. I did a couple of fights against some actors in a different costumes as a stunt man, but I prepared Maisie for the fight with the small sword and the big sword in the courtyard with Brienne, I spent hours and hours with her on that dance.
They asked me if I wanted to be the Night King because they liked my performance in season 5 when I was fighting with Jon Snow and he killed me in the cottage. After that episode they asked me if I wanted to play the role for season 6 and I said yes why not.
What did you think of this Sunday's episode, it was a big one for you?
No, I don’t need to say anything because I kept running everything through my mind.
This was one of the hardest days of my life. It was raining, it was cold, it wasn’t easy for Maisie to jump at the right time, it wasn’t easy for me to grab her at the right time, it was the most difficult thing to do in front of a camera. I did many difficult stunts, running through fire, many crazy things. But this moment with Arya when I grab her, and the emotions from Maisie were so strong, I felt like I spent all my energy that day.
What do you think was the Night King's motivation in the end?
It’s not a fun life.
After that shattering conclusion in which Arya stabbed the evil leader, causing him to disintegrate into a million pieces, we may never know why he wanted to annihilate the living.
Because somebody, many years ago, made some mistake and he became the Night King, and he didn't want to be the Night King.
Did you ever want to say anything on the show?
What was it like shooting that final scene with Arya?
Furdík, who was previously a stunt man on the show and only started playing the Night King in season 6, revealed the white walker's darkest secrets.
SPOILER ALERT: Do not keep reading unless you’ve seen “Game of Thrones” Season 8 Episode 3, titled “The Long Night.” 
My daughter, she is very critical of everything I do, and she just said, "Wow, that’s unbelievable," and she was very happy. When I saw this I said, "Oh My god." The music when I’m walking to Bran, it was amazing, I was so proud to be a part of this show. She is always critical when I am a stunt man and fight, but if she loved it, for me that beats what anyone else says.
I was so happy to have work, especially in this business. Now we do. Nobody knew how this character would grow up. As a stunt man, many times directors asked me if I wanted to play small roles, until season 5, nobody knew how big this role was. It became bigger step by step, people started to talk about the Night King from season 6.
What was going through your mind when you were playing the character?
He’s tired of living out there in the cold and the snow.” /> He was like now I have a way to go to war. Now I kill everybody because you made me the Night King and made me live seven or 10 thousand years behind the wall in a cold country.
With the costume and the makeup you already are the Night King, the makeup changes you, it helps you so much. Because I wasn't an actor, he gave me a lesson on how to play. He said, "I would like to see your tears, just play with your face." He gave me many tests and directed me exactly where to go. Afterwards my homework was to go to the hotel and cry in front of the mirror. Miguel Sapochnik [the director] also made the job easier for me. We had many discussions before in the office.
He wants revenge.
However, Czech actor Vladimír Furdík the man behind all the makeup and prosthetics, told Variety that the Night King's motivation is clear: "revenge."
You just used your face to express things.
Revenge for what?
How did you score the role of Night King?
Easy, I picked up the phone, somebody said, ‘Hey Vlad, do you want to be the Night King,’ and I said, 'Yes!'

Only time will tell if these final episodes can pull that kind of hairpin turn off, but looking back at multiple seasons building up to the idea that the Iron Throne doesn’t ultimately matter, it’s still baffling to watch the final season rush to forget it.” /> There could be something fascinating in telling the story of a traumatized world rebuilding after the end of the world and relapsing into petty squabbles. Now that he's neutralized, it's going to be extremely tricky for the show to snap back to royal basics and make them feel as weighty as they did before the potential apocalypse. The White Walkers, for all their mythic might, were never as interesting as the bickering humans playing mind games with each other, but the show seemed to forget that as it set up the Night King to be the Biggest Bad that anyone on "Game of Thrones" would face.
There’s never been an episode of TV like “The Long Night.” The long-awaited Battle of Winterfell delivered 82 minutes of heart-stopping, overwhelming, and extremely chaotic warfare on a truly massive scale, bringing the ultimate showdown of humanity versus death to a thrilling end. But after years of “Game of Thrones” building to this climactic moment, the biggest question facing the series and its characters, many of whom are miraculously still standing, is a simple and frustrating one: What now?
Arya’s final blow means the definitive defeat of the biggest threat the world has ever seen — and we’re only halfway through the final season. For as jaw-dropping as this episode is, the fact that it ends with the Night King’s unequivocal defeat contradicts the show's own narrative. With three episodes left, it sure looks like the show just defeated the Night King in order to throw everyone back into playing musical chairs with the Iron Throne before the final credits roll.
SPOILER ALERT: Do not read before watching “The Long Night,” the third episode of “Game of Thrones’” final season.
On the flip side: After years of underlining just how huge and terrifying and all-consuming the threat of White Walker destruction would be, plunging back into "who gets to sit on that pointy chair" will also feel very silly.
“Absolute power corrupts absolutely” gave way to “some [undead] men just want to watch the world burn.” But the further the TV show got from the books, and the more it pushed the Night King as its ultimate horror, it somehow became both more black and white and more muddled in what it was trying to say. With George R.R. This, plus the fact that not a single major death in “The Long Night” was at all narratively shocking, shows how much “Game of Thrones” has lost its handle on raising the stakes like it once did so well. Martin’s dense and often ruthless text to guide it in the early seasons, “Game of Thrones” always managed to balance familial infighting with overarching threats while still pulling the rug out from under our expectations.
It could also be fascinating to watch everyone snap back into the banal pettiness of clashing dynasties after facing the end of the world. Cersei Lannister has proven herself to be the show’s most charismatic villain by a long shot, and seeing how the new alliances forged up North may join forces to bring her down will no doubt be entertaining as hell. On the one hand, the sun-drenched court politics of King’s Landing made for some of the series’ best moments and can represent “Game of Thrones” at its sharpest.
When Daenerys inevitably re-commands those stubborn Northerners to bend the knee, why would they do anything but laugh after beating back the reanimated corpses of their loved ones? Without knowing quite what’s to come, it’s safe to say that watching the show get re-invested in the Lannister versus Targaryean versus Stark drama after cashing all its chips in on saying none of it matters will, at the very least, be downright bizarre. The show spent so long convincing its viewers and protagonists alike that the war between the living and the dead was the ultimate conflict that ending it halfway through the season is as jarring as it is anticlimactic. How is anyone who fought in that battle supposed to care about Cersei and her frat bro fiance after staring literal death in the face?