"Night School" has a slightly higher price tag at $29 million. If estimates hold, the launch of "Night School" looks to be on par with "Girls Trip's" $30 million start. The film reunites Haddish with "Girls Trip" director Malcolm D. The PG-13 comedy finds Haddish playing an unorthodox teacher helping Hart get his GED. Lee and producer Will Packer. Universal's "Night School" is eyeing a debut between $27 million and $35 million from 2,900 theaters. That raunchy comedy became a sleeper hit, grossing over $140 million worldwide off its $19 million budget.
It hits theaters in 2019. Pinnacle Peak's "Little Women" is opening on far fewer screens. The indie release is getting out ahead of the high-profile adaptation directed by Greta Gerwig and starring Saoirse Ronan, Timothée Chalamet, Meryl Streep, and Emma Watson. The seventh film adaptation of Louisa May Alcott's classic novel should bring in $3 million when it debuts in 600 locations, timed to the novel's 150th anniversary. First-time filmmaker Clare Niederpruem directed the movie, which stars Lea Thompson as  Marmee.
Hart has long been a box office draw, but "Night School" will test the star power of Haddish in her first lead role since breaking out in last year's "Girls Trip." The comedienne solidified her charm making rounds on the late-night TV circuit, hawking Groupon and hosting "Saturday Night Live," which won her a guest actress Emmy. She's also earned admirers, including "There Will Be Blood" auteur Paul Thomas Anderson, who is open with his ambitions to work with her on a future film. We'd love to see her take on Daniel Plainview.
Before the comedic duo can claim box office victory, however, they'll have to fend off one adorable Yeti. Kevin Hart and Tiffany Haddish are hoping that big laughs equal big bucks when "Night School" opens this weekend.
"Smallfoot" isn't the only movie targeting kids. Universal's "The House With a Clock in Its Walls" will try to build on its stronger than expected opening last weekend. The fantasy film, starring Jack Black and Cate Blanchett, debuted to $26.8 million.
There are a slew of new indie films opening at the specialty box office. Robert Redford (in the final role of his career — or not?) stars alongside Casey Affleck in the larcenous comedy based on a New Yorker article about an octogenarian bank robber. Fox Searchlight is releasing "The Old Man and the Gun" in five theaters. Neon is releasing "Monsters and Men," a Sundance drama with John David Washington and "Hamilton" alum Anthony Ramos; while National Geographic Entertainment has "Free Solo," a documentary about the first free solo rock climb of Yosemite's El Capitan.” />
It was a global smash, earning a massive $962 million. Haddish has a slew of titles hitting multiplexes in the next few months, including "The Oath" with Ike Barinholtz, Tyler Perry's "Nobody's Fool," and a voice role in Warner Bros.' "The Lego Movie 2." Hart's latest big screen outing was "Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle," the follow-up to the 1995 Robin Williams film.
The cast includes Common, LeBron James, Gina Rodriguez, Danny DeVito, and Tara Shahidi. "Night School's" fiercest competition will be the Warner Bros.' family-friendly film "Smallfoot." The animated comedy is aiming to pull in around $25 million when it bows on over 4,000 screens. And Zendaya is Meechee, but you probably already knew that. Karey Kirkpatrick, known for his work on "James and the Giant Peach," "Charlotte's Web," and "Over the Hedge," co-wrote and directed the film. In a twist on the legendary tale, Channing Tatum voices a Yeti named Migo, who comes across a human named Percy (James Corden), as both think the other species was just a myth.
Lionsgate and CBS Films are getting in on the spooky spirit a little early with the low-budget horror film that takes place in a theme park during Halloween. "Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension" and "Happy Death Day" director Gregory Plotkin handled filmmaking duties. A costumed serial killer begins terrorizing a group of friends, who aren't sure if it's part of the park experience. Then there's "Hell Fest," which looks to make $5 million to $9 million from 2,200 venues.

After the success of "Girls Trip," though, she found herself in the company of many of Hollywood's biggest names, some of whom have taken on the role of mentors and advisers. Haddish also detailed her difficult upbringing during the event, telling of being placed in foster care at a young age and working as a struggling comedian while homeless.
Mara Brock Akil, creator of "Love Is_ " and "Being Mary Jane," presented Farquhar with the award, as the producer gave her her start as a writer on "Moesha."
"After being homeless three times I'm never afraid to ask, 'Help me, show me, can you teach me.' I was working with Melissa McCarthy, I was like 'How do you develop your characters?' I ask Jada [Pinkett Smith] questions all the time, Queen Latifah, I'm never afraid to ask, 'How can you help me?'" Haddish credited Smith, her "Girls Trip" co-star, with fashion advice before admitting that the dress she wore to the event she "stole this off the set of 'Night School,' you're gonna see this in the movie. Perry is not the only one helping Haddish reach success, she added. I was like 'This is a cute dress.'"
As comedy's current "It" girl, Haddish is fielding plenty of offers, but said her choice of projects hinges on "anything that resonates with my soul I want to do, whether it be dramatic, cartoon, comedy, whatever…makes me feel like it would enhance other women and men and make society better in a way." 
At Hollywood Confidential's An Evening with Tiffany Haddish in Los Angeles on Friday night, the star told Variety that down the line, "I want to get my production company up and running, be able to provide a lot of jobs for people that actually have talent and skill, I want to still open up those streets — get two streets that intersect called Tiffany and Haddish — open up that youth center, that job placement center, that art center, that mental health center. I really want to give everyone a chance to be their selves." With current roles in "The Last OG" and "Uncle Drew," and soon starring in "Night School" and "Nobody's Fool," the funnywoman has a full schedule and even bigger dreams on the horizon.
Following a year that has made her a household name after her breakout role in "Girls Trip," Tiffany Haddish has no plans of slowing down.
One of those famous friends is Tyler Perry, who Haddish worked with a few years ago on "If Loving You Is Wrong" and again on the upcoming "Nobody's Fool." She said she has repeatedly asked him to teach her how to build an empire like his own. Eventually Perry gave in, and "he started teaching me things, sending me messages when I do stuff, I'll ask him 'What's your advice on this, what would you do, how would you handle this?'"
Past participants include Sterling K. The Hollywood Confidential is a free panel series designed to educate aspiring actors, producers, directors and writers on the inner workings of the entertainment industry. Brown, Issa Rae, Snoop Dogg and Regina King.” />
On a more serious note, the actress even remembered getting early comedy advice from Richard Pryor and guidance from producer Ralph Farquhar, who was honored at the event with the Legend Award, while Haddish received the Trailblazer Award.
During the conversation, hosted by Hollywood Confidential creator Steve Jones, she elaborated: "When I read scripts, I always think of 16-year-old Tiffany. Would 16-year-old Tiffany be telling all of her friends 'Guess what I'm about to do, let's go to the movies, let's see if we can get a fake ID and sneak into this, you think your big sister would take us to see this?'" Would 16-year-old Tiffany want to see this?
I know I'm not the only one so I'll speak for everybody, there's probably thousands of lives that you have touched," she said, adding that he employed black directors even "back then." "Production designers, you didn't hear about black production designers, you were doing that back then…You created space for our stories." "Thank you for changing my life, for seeing something in me. Thank you for creating space so that I could do what I do, so that I could have a dream realized.
Farquhar, former showrunner of "Real Husbands of Hollywood" and a producer on "Married with Children" and "Moesha," remembered meeting Haddish early in her career and scolding her for telling dirty jokes to the child actors on the set of TV series "Just Jordan."