BEST SOUND DESIGN
BEST SET DESIGN
BEST NEW OPERA PRODUCTION
Forster, who also happens to be a character in the play. playwright Matthew Lopez, which is headed to Broadway, is inspired by and loosely based on the novel “Howards End” by E.M. The two-parter by U.S. The Olivier for best new play went to “The Inheritance,” which explores the relationships and friendships of several gay American men of the post-AIDS-crisis generation.
“Come From Away” was named best new musical. The story of a Canadian town that took in stranded airline passengers immediately after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the musical also won a trophy for choreographer Kelly Devine.
BEST ACTOR IN A MUSICAL
"A Monster Calls"
"The Inheritance"
BEST ACTOR
Stephen Daldry won the Olivier for his direction of “The Inheritance,” and Kyle Soller won for best actor for his performance in the play, which also featured a brief appearance by Vanessa Redgrave. Patsy Ferran won the best actress award for her turn in “Summer and Smoke,” which was named best revival of a play.
“Home, I’m Darling” was named best new comedy.
BEST NEW MUSICAL
"Summer and Smoke"
BEST NEW DANCE PRODUCTION
Patsy Ferran, "Summer and Smoke"
Monica Dolan took home the trophy for best supporting actress in a play, performing opposite Gillian Anderson in "All About Eve." Chris Walley won the best supporting actor award for "The Lieutenant of Inishmore."
Akram Khan, "Xenos"
Jon Clark, "The Inheritance"
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN DANCE
"Katya Kabanova," Royal Opera House
BEST LIGHTING DESIGN
"Flesh and Bone"
"Come From Away" – Book, Music and Lyrics: David Hein and Irene Sankoff; Music Supervisor, Arrangements: Ian Eisendrath; Orchestrations: August Eriksmoen; Musical Director/UK Music Supervisor: Alan Berry; and the band
BEST ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL
BEST NEW COMEDY
Catherine Zuber, "The King and I"
Patti LuPone, "Company"
BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MUSICAL
A gender-swapped revival of Stephen Sondheim’s “Company,” the 9/11-related musical “Come From Away,” and a seven-hour gay-themed play, “The Inheritance,” each won four Olivier Awards in London on Sunday.
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN AFFILIATE THEATRE
Chris Walley, "The Lieutenant of Inishmore"
BEST ENTERTAINMENT AND FAMILY
The ensemble of "Porgy and Bess"
BEST REVIVAL
Sharon D. Clarke, "Caroline, or Change"
Kyle Soller, "The Inheritance"
Jonathan Bailey, "Company"
"Blkdog" by Botis Seva
BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
"Home, I'm Darling"
"Come From Away"
BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MUSICAL
Bunny Christie, "Company"
BEST DIRECTOR
Gareth Owen, "Come From Away"
BEST MUSICAL REVIVAL
Kelly Devine, "Come From Away"
Matthew Bourne” />
Monica Dolan, "All About Eve"
BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
The production won the Olivier for best revival of a musical. It was directed by Marianne Elliott, whose revival last year of “Angels in America,” starring Andrew Garfield and Nathan Lane, also received widespread acclaim. The new iteration of “Company” drew rave reviews – and, unusually, had Sondheim’s permission – for turning the original male protagonist, Bobby, into Bobbi, a thirty-something woman dealing with commitment issues.
SOCIETY OF LONDON THEATRE SPECIAL AWARD
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC
The full list of Olivier Award winners:
Her fellow “Company” cast member Jonathan Bailey, whose lightning-fast, show-stopping rendition of the song “Not Getting Married Today” became a must-see West End event, won for best supporting actor in a musical. Stage icon Patti LuPone took home one of the Oliviers – Britain’s equivalent of the Tonys – for “Company,” for best supporting actress in a musical.
BEST THEATRE CHOREOGRAPHER
BEST NEW PLAY
Kobna Holdbrook-Smith, "The Tina Turner Musical"
BEST COSTUME DESIGN
"Company"
Stephen Daldry, "The Inheritance"
BEST ACTRESS
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN OPERA

On "Stagecraft," Karl also explained why he thinks the knight-in-shining-armor fairy tale of "Pretty Woman" works in today's heightened awareness of gender parity issues: "She can save him right back." Plus, he revealed why he loves sharing the stage with his wife, Orfeh (who co-stars in "Pretty Woman"), described his "Groundhog Day" tattoo, and let fans know how that knee is doing.
So when it comes to his latest project — "Pretty Woman," the musical adaptation of the famous Julia Roberts-Richard Gere comedy — he knows that being faithful to the original is just as important as bringing something new to the table. Andy Karl knows a thing or two about Broadway musicals based on movies after playing the UPS guy in "Legally Blonde," the Italian Stallion himself in "Rocky," and the jaded weatherman in "Groundhog Day" (in an Olivier-winning performance).
The musical opened last month to very mixed reviews, but that hasn't stopped audiences from turning out in droves. "For 'Groundhog Day' … It blew my mind. … Reviews, to me, have lessened in value." That's just part of the reason Karl doesn't place much trust in reviews anymore. But then we get to New York, reviews were great here, but we just couldn’t get audiences to come see it. Five stars, all the way across, Olivier Award. I had never read such glowing reviews before. Especially about myself!
Find past episodes here and on Apple Podcasts.” /> New episodes of "Stagecraft" are available every other Tuesday in July, August, and September, and then weekly beginning in October. Download and subscribe to "Stagecraft" on iTunes, Stitcher, or anywhere finer podcasts are dispensed.
"Doing shows like 'Groundhog Day' and 'Rocky,' I know there are certain things that you need throughout the piece to remind people of how much they love it. "This particular musical needs all the elements. You’re working on a part of the brain that’s nostalgic." "[The musical] is very faithful to the film, and I don’t think you can get around that," Karl said on the latest episode of "Stagecraft," Variety's theater podcast. It needs the dress, it needs the necklace, it needs certain lines," he continued, referring to the iconic scene from the film in which Roberts, dressed in a red opera gown, gets an expensive necklace as a gift from Gere.