It wasn't until he fainted while working in a salon that he "cleaned up" his act. Van Ness then moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career as a hairstylist, where he was introduced to methamphetamine, resulting in two rehab trips and two relapses. The day after he fainted, Van Ness revealed, he went to Planned Parenthood where he tested positive for H.I.V.
“That day was just as devastating as you would think it would be,” he writes.
"Queer Eye's" Jonathan Van Ness is getting vulnerable in his new memoir “Over the Top.”
In a preview of his book with the New York Times, Van Ness opened up about his early struggles with sex and drug addiction as well as his experience with sexual assault, revealing that he was abused by an older boy from his childhood church.
Later on, Van Ness started college at the University of Arizona in Tucson where he began doing cocaine. That trauma, Van Ness revealed, led to a series of other "self-destructive" behaviors, including spending hours in AOL chat rooms, which he used to meet up with older men for sex in his teens. And after spending his monthly allowance on the drug, he began advertising sex for more money. Soon after, he flunked out of college.
“For a lot of people who are survivors of sexual assault at a young age, we have a lot of compounded trauma,” he said.
“Over the Top” is set to be released on Sept. Following his diagnosis, Van Ness said he still drinks and smokes marijuana but hasn't done hard drugs in years. 24.” />


The GoFundMe page, set up by Vanessa Gamet, says Guilbeaux is a “strong, black lesbian woman” who was thrown out of the house by her adoptive family at age 16 after coming out, and has been financially independent ever since. She started studying computer science at the University of Kansas, but was forced to drop out after accumulating too much debt. A GoFundMe campaign has raised more than $95,000 of its $100,000 goal.
Guilbeaux revealed on the GoFundMe page that the donations have allowed her to pay off all of her student loans. “I'm so excited and ready to continue my education with a fresh new star,” she wrote.
After appearing on “Queer Eye,” Guilbeaux has started performing in drag shows, according to her Instagram. She posted on Instagram about her experience on the show, “I learned how to love my natural curls, love my highly melanated skin, and all of what makes up who i am (a fierce gay kween™️).”” />
“Queer Eye” helped give contestant Jess Guilbeaux a makeover in Season 3, and now fans of the show have helped her return to college.
i’m dehydrated at this point,” followed by crying emojis. Guilbeaux said she has been in contact with Gamet and confirmed that the fundraiser is legitimate. i have no words. She tweeted, “This is so sweet.

However, Brown said the LGTBQ community still has a ways to go in its representation of people of color.
As she accepted the Community Leadership Award, Thais-Williams said she created the club to provide a safe space for queer people of color. Thais-Williams, who opened the black gay disco-club Catch One in 1973, was next to receive an award for her work within the LGBTQ community. At the time, she said there were no other places to go, so clubs and parties were essential in establishing a safe space, which also helped her come to terms with her own sexuality.
Griffin also pointed out the importance of organizations like Equality for queer people in America that are not in a position to come out, before turning to the current presidency as a warning for audience members to get out and vote. However, as she accepted the Ally Leadership Award at the LA Equality Awards, Griffin's main focus was highlighting the queer community and encouraging people to vote in the upcoming midterm elections. Griffin recounted her experiences growing up and making friends with the one gay person in her class, setting off years of LGBTQ support.
In between speeches, drinks flowed freely as guests enjoyed dinner while making donations via phone texts. By the end of the night, LA Equality raised more than $140,000.” />
"I’m going to basically keep it in a temperature controlled vault until people come to their senses, whether it’s HBO or whomever." "I’m so proud of this material, and I’m so glad the audiences are responding so well," Griffin said.
"It’s a blessing to give and to be available, and I was gifted with the blessing when I opened the Catch One." "The Catch provided me a venue, a place and a space for me to come out too. Before I got there I had one foot in the closet, and the other one was on the threshold of the closet," Thais-Williams said.
"You know, I come to these awards, and I never see an Asian trans person," Brown said. "I think that we have got to continue to make sure that we encourage the conversation and allow people to know that they matter, and that they should be visible at these events."
He also encouraged audience members to recognize the power of their own voices with a ballroom chant of "my voice has power." Last up was "Queer Eye's" Karamo Brown and series executive producer Michael Williams, who accepted the Equality Visibility Award on behalf of the the show's entire cast and crew. During the rousing speech, Brown recounted the experiences of the Fab Five growing up as members of the LGBTQ community, experiences that didn't necessarily feature the same confident gay men that appear on television now.
"The only way that can happen is when you remember that your voice has power." "No longer should it be us vs them, it should be us working together for our families and for love and for unity," Brown said.
Griffin, who was being honored for her longstanding relationship with the LGBTQ community alongside gay club owner Jewel Thais-Williams and Netflix's "Queer Eye" cast and crew, recently returned from a world tour of her "Laugh Your Head Off" comedy show, which she performed in 17 different countries outside of the United States. After garnering national outrage for posing with a fake decapitated Trump head on social media, the 57-year-old comedian said she believes she was purposefully silenced by the Trump administration, forcing her to tour the show internationally.
"I really still feel like they kind of used me as the test case, and what I said then I still believe, which is if it can happen to me it can happen to you," Griffin said.
29 stop of her "Laugh Your Head Off" tour at the Santa Monica College Performing Arts Center. Directed by Troy Miller of Dakota Pictures, the self-funded special will be filmed at the Oct. Now, after bringing the show back to the United States, Griffin is creating a new, three-hour comedy special about her experiences undergoing a federal investigation, which she hopes will pave the way for her return to television.
"It’s a different kind of show than I’ve ever done," she told Variety at Saturday's LA Equality Awards in Downtown Los Angeles. "I’m still scary to all of the 60-year-old, white, male dinosaurs that are afraid to put me on TV…so I’m just going to get it in the can as they say."
Kathy Griffin is back in America, and this time she's creating her own comedy special.

“We’re so lucky to work in TV,” added Kressley, the "RuPaul’s Drag Race" judge, on an uncharacteristically serious note. “It’s really having a renaissance right now and so inclusive and diverse.”
It gives me chills to be in a category with her let alone Dame Diana Rigg, Viola Davis, Cherry Jones, and Samira Wiley. “When I think about the category that I’m in [guest actress in a drama series] — and the women who are in that category — it is just mind-blowing. I feel like I am standing on Cicely Tyson’s shoulders, and that’s why I am able to be here right now talking to you because of the path that Cicely paved. Kelly M. Jenrette, a nominee for "The Handmaid’s Tale," is similarly thrilled to join the club. Just to be a part of that legacy of women leaves me speechless.”
"Drag Race" star Kameron Michaels praised the progress that has been made, saying, “I never thought I would see drag on TV let alone 12 nominations for Emmys, but we had a sickening season, and RuPaul killed it."
“Are we 70 already? Gosh, I remember the first one like it was yesterday,” Carson Kressley, who was the fashion expert on the original iteration of "Queer Eye," joked with Variety at the TV Academy’s (platinum) performer peer group celebration on Monday night.
The Emmys are turning 70, and the Television Academy brought together some of this year's nominees at NeueHouse Hollywood in Los Angeles to celebrate.
“I didn’t realize it was 7-0 until I actually became part of it all. My favorite part of the Emmys is ‘In Memorial,’ and now, being nominated, I think, ‘Well, I probably will be in a clip of ‘In Memorial’ when I die.' Hopefully that won’t be for a long, long time. I’m very happy to be a part of the club.” “I’ve watched the Emmys since the beginning of my life and practiced a little speech because as an actor, who hasn’t?” asked Adina Porter, who is nominated for "American Horror Story: Cult" and will also appear on the upcoming "Apocalypse" season of the show.
One can only imagine what luxurious congratulatory gifts were sent out by Netflix, which reigned supreme with 112 nominations. “It’s awkward because I’m in [HBO’s] 'Barry' as well, but I’ve worked for Netflix twice now and in my experience, they run the business side and they let the creatives run the creative side. “It’s the best — and it’s the best to be a part of it,” "Mindhunter" star Cameron Britton said of the streaming service’s sweep. That’s how Roy and Walt Disney did it, and it was incredibly successful for them.”
While actors like Britton and Jenrette are greener on the awards circuit, some nominees, such as 'Barry'’s Henry Winkler, are older than the award show itself. Ditto for Christina Pickles: “This is the seventh time I’ve been nominated,” the actress said. Ironically, Pickles couldn’t even watch the Emmys, since she grew up in England.
“That was a long time ago — the turn of the century,” she joked. “It’s always such a delight to watch everybody walk down the carpet and see all the glamour and the glitz,” said Drew, who played Dr. She’s already got her dress picked out and can’t wait to attend the ceremony next month. But actress Sarah Drew, who is nominated for her directorial debut on "Grey’s Anatomy: B-Team," fondly recalls “practicing my speech with a hair brush in my mirror” as a little girl. April Kepner on ABC's hit medical drama.
However, the "Queer Eye for the Straight Guy" veteran couldn’t resist a jab at the revised Fab Five’s Netflix reboot. “I’m thrilled that they’re nominated, but it was a little more groundbreaking back when we won an Emmy in 2004,” he said.
“We live in a culture that he helped to create, and he was way more than a fashion designer. Edgar Ramirez and Darren Criss, who portray the iconic designer and his murderer, respectively, in "The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story," which snared 18 nods, worked the carpet in tandem. He was a true social disruptor and cultural force.” “It was a huge honor to me because Gianna Versace is someone I admired a lot,” said Ramirez.
Meanwhile, it left the powers that be at Hulu extremely grateful, since "The Handmaid’s Tale" racked up a total of 20 nominations for the streaming service. “They sent me a couple bottles of champagne, and I don’t even drink,” Jenrette said.
“You don’t always get to work on things that are compelling stories that have value, that have a lot to say, that fascinate you and spark important discussions. To say that Criss felt honored to land such a meaty role is an understatement, however. That’s the real victory. It’s probably all downhill from here,” the former "Glee" star said.” /> “As an actor, it’s nice work if you can get it, right? Like, I’ll work on anything,” admitted Criss.