You felt the connection.” /> They want to hear about screening rooms, those mythical posh bunkers. There were no trimmings, nothing there — except, on occasion, the person’s head in the seat in front of you — to get between you and the movie. What those rooms, in their la-di-da way, represent is the reverence for cinema. And at Magno, you always felt the purity of that reverence, maybe because the room itself was so ordinary. But I know that’s not the answer they’re looking for. Of all the questions I routinely get asked as a film critic, the one that always comes up — it’s second only to "What’s your favorite movie?" — is "Where do you see the movies?" I usually start off by saying that those of us who are New York-based critics see movies in a variety of places, including, nearly every week, the Times Square megaplexes where “all-media screenings” are held for blockbusters and other commercial releases. What you felt at Magno was primal.
But one of the reasons that the Magno Screening Rooms are closing down, apart from the perpetual scandal of over-the-top rents for New York commercial real estate, is the rise of link culture. And though there are a handful of independent screening rooms left in New York that, theoretically, can take up the slack (the stately and inviting Dolby 88, the elegant Park Avenue Screening Room), the closing down of Magno has to make one wonder how long they’re going to be around. Independent film companies, the kind that have always used Magno for several hundred dollars an hour, may increasingly think of links as a way to cut costs.
They’ve been there for 68 years, and for those of us who are lucky enough to include watching a movie in the middle of the day as part of our jobs, and who have spent more of our daily lives watching movies in those two rooms — especially the main one, Magno 1 — than we have anywhere else, it feels like the curtain is coming down on something. This Wednesday, the famed Magno Screening Rooms in New York, at 729 7th Ave. I wonder if it’s one more telling, creeping example of the metaphysic of movies transitioning from a shared experience to a solitary-viewer-fixed-on-the-small-screen transaction. (near the corner of W. Apart from the boilerplate end-of-an-era nostalgia that always accompanies a moment like this, I wonder, in a way, if it is the end of an era. 49th St.), will close their doors for the very last time.
The greatest film I ever saw in that tiny room was "Ed Wood," and to this day, when I think of "Ed Wood" (which I’ve seen a dozen times), the first thing that flashes into my head is watching it at Magno 2. I saw "Reservoir Dogs" there, and "Boogie Nights," and "The Piano" and "The Wrestler," and "Menace II Society" and "Mulholland Drive," and "Lost in Translation" and "Memento" and "A Separation" and "Birdman." The screening room across the hall, Magno 2, was the one you thought of as "too small," and it was, but if you sat in the back row, as was my insistent custom (there were, I believe, only five rows), it gave you an ironically panoramic view of a screen that loomed up before you. In so many ways, though, it was the place.
As someone who periodically reviews films off links, because that’s the only available way to see them ahead of time, I treat them as a necessary evil and do all that I can to level the playing field of my own perceptions. At any moment, you’re a click and a password away from watching that indie Greg Kinnear thriller or documentary about human-rights abuses in Syria on your computer screen. Now, instead of DVDs, there are links. At least the movie is getting reviewed — and, after all, it isn’t a perfect world.
The joke is that for a place that hosted screenings of many of the most vital films around, it has always been a notably flawed venue. It was a ritual, a second home, a connection to the past, and a rather perverse joke. The nine or ten rows of seats are raked ever so slightly (imagine stadium seating as first designed in 1890), but the screen itself, which is a perfectly good size, is sunk down a bit too low, so that if you’re sitting in, say, the third row (or the fourth row, or fifth row, or just about any row), and the place is at all full, you’re liable to find yourself tilting to the side to see around the person in front of you and take in the whole screen. It is, for one thing, a little grubby. I suspect I speak for more than a few movie critics when I say that Magno wasn’t just a screening room.
The studios, like Fox and Warner Bros. They became an additional way to “pre-screen” a movie (the DVDs were called "screeners"), and though this was a convenience I held out from partaking in as long as humanly possible, believing that it wasn’t fair to the movies (a film you "screened" on DVD wasn’t being experienced on a level playing field with a movie you saw in a screening room), the battle was doomed. What began to change in the 2000s was the introduction of DVDs to film-critic culture. and Universal, always tended to use their own screening rooms, and still do, though every so often they would use Magno.
But the comedy of Magno is that it’s a New York phenomenon that no one even bothered to complain about, because it’s just something that you accepted, like the tourist hordes of Times Square or the sound of Michael Savage blaring from a cab driver’s radio. That the most widely used screening room in New York had the worst sight lines of any screening room you could imagine is one of those quirks that make life interesting.
Other rooms were notably cushier, like the Broadway Screening Room in the fabled Brill Building, with its plush wide seats and womb-like aura of inner-sanctum exclusivity, or Todd-AO, a sprawling, high-ceilinged facility that had the greatest sound of any of them. Yet in the last decade, as those rooms closed down, Magno, though it isn’t quite the last of them, became the last New York screening room that felt like a hub. Magno was created in 1950 (it also had a Sound and Recording Studio, which will continue on in another location), and in the '80s, when I first started coming to New York for screenings, it was one of a handful of screening rooms that were rented out to show a mixture of studio and (mostly) independent features. With its shaggy accessibility and center-of-midtown location, it seemed to take the very idea of watching a movie before it came out, in a hobbit-hole chamber sprinkled with media and film-world people, and democratize it.

"Much better than last year," she replied, as a sub-zero wind blew back her hair. Standing with Ryan Seacrest, Camilla Cabello and others on the podium after the countdown, Seacrest asked her how she felt.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=C4cQHlL5Mz0″ />
Mariah Carey stumbled on a few notes but gamely sang two songs on a freezing New Year's Eve in New York City's Times Square, returning to the scene of her disastrous "New Year's Rockin' Eve" performance of a year ago. While a bit bumpy, the performance would have been challenging for any singer: She sang "Vision of Love" and "Hero" on a raised platform in 10-degree weather that felt like -7, factoring in wind chill.
and ran through her performance. Despite unfounded rumblings earlier in the day about the extreme cold in Times Square possibly making it impossible for Carey to rehearse — temperatures remained in the teens all day and into the night — the singer arrived to her soundcheck at 2 p.m. According to a source, Carey "was great all day" and "on time for everything."
I’m going to be just like everybody else with no hot tea," and then launched into "Hero." After performing "Vision of Love," she said: “I’m just going to take a sip of tea if they’ll let me. The performance was not without a diva moment, albeit a minor one. They told me there would be tea.” When no tea materialized, she said, “Ugh, it’s a disaster. Okay, well, we’ll just have to rough it.
The band ran through their best-known numbers, including 2010's "Stuck Like Glue." Another highly touted return was that of country duo Sugarland, who hadn't performed together in six years.
Many fans had been lined up since early in the morning to secure prime views of the acts, and many had traveled to New York from out of state or other countries for the holiday. "Dick Clark's Rockin' New Year's Eve with Ryan Seacrest" featured several more performers live from Times Square, including Camila Cabello, who delivered her hit song "Havana" and Nick Jonas, who performed a medley. Cabello graciously stopped to snap some photos with a few admirers from London following her bow.

Now, who’s hot who not
Tell me who rock who sell out in the stores
You tell me who flopped who copped the blue drop
Who jewels got robbed who’s mostly Goldie down
To the tube sock, the same ol pimp
Mase, you know ain’t nothing change but my limp
Can’t stop till I see my name on a blimp
Guarantee a million sales pulling all the love
You don’t believe in Harlem World nigga double up
We don’t play around it’s a bet lay it down
Nigga didn’t know me ninety-one bet they know me now
I’m the young Harlem nigga with the Goldie sound
Can’t no PHD niggas hold me down, Cooter
Schooled me to the game, now I know my duty
Stay humble stay low blow like Hootie
True pimp niggas spend no dough on the booty
And then ya yell there go Mase there go your cutie

I don’t know what, they want from me
It’s like the more money we come across
The more problems we see
[2X]

Yeah yeah, ahaha, I’m the C-to-the-A-to-the-D-D-Y
Know you’d rather see me die than to see me fly
I call all the shots
Rip all the spots, rock all the rocks
Cop all the drops, I know you thinking now’s
When all the balling stops, nigga never
Home gotta call me on the yacht
Ten years from now we’ll still be on top
Yo, I thought I told you that we won’t stop
Now what you gonna do when it’s cool
Bag a money much longer than yours
And a team much stronger than yours, violate me
This’ll be your day, we don’t play
Mess around be D.O.A., be on your way
Cause it ain’t enough time here, ain’t enough lime here
For you to shine here, deal with many women
But treat dimes fair, and I’m
Bigger than the city lights down in Times Square
Yeah, yeah yeah

I don’t know what, they want from me
It’s like the more money we come across
The more problems we see
[2X]

Uhh, uhhh
B.I.G., P-O, P-P-A
No info, for the, DEA
Federal agents mad cause I’m flagrant
Tap my cell, and the phone in the basement
My team supreme, stay clean
Triple beam lyrical dream, I be that
Cat you see at all events bent
Gats in holsters girls on shoulders
Playboy, I told ya, being mice to me
Bruise too much, I lose, too much
Step on stage the girls boo too much
I guess it’s cause you run with lame dudes too much
Me lose my touch, never that
If I did, ain’t no problem to get the gat
Where the true players at?
Throw your rollies in the sky
Wave em side to side and keep their hands high
While I give your girl the eye, player please
Lyrically, niggas see, B.I.G.
Be flossing jig on the cover of Fortune
Five double oh, here’s my phone number
Your name, I got to know, I got to go
Got the flow down phizat, platinum plus
Like thizat, dangerous
On trizack, leave your ass kizzack

I don’t know what, they want from me
It’s like the more money we come across
The more problems we see
[3X]

What’s going on?
What’s going on?
I don’t know what, they want from me
It’s like the more money we come across
The more problems we see
[3X]

A little bit here
A little bit there
All the pieces my heart could spare
You’re my sunshine
And these city lights don’t compare
You’re standing there, with your overcoat
But you feel so bare

Is it ever really fair?
All the nights I spent away from you

I want next to you
And I’ll confess to you
For you there is no limit
Dear, we’re falling faster than a New York minute
I want next to you
And all your affections too
For you there is no limit
Dear we’re falling faster than a New York minute

Together a pair
Anywhere with you I swear
To the Brooklyn bridge, or even Times Square
Between the bustling streets
The sirens and police
I can hear you
I can hear your heartbeat

I want next to you
And I’ll confess to you
For you there is no limit
Dear, we’re falling faster than a New York minute
I want next to you
And all your affections too
For you there is no limit
Dear we’re falling faster than a New York minute

I never want to see you go
Falling and we lose control
Only took a minute to know
To know

I want next to you
And I’ll confess to you
For you there is no limit
Dear, we’re falling faster (falling faster)
I want next to you
And I’ll confess to you
For you there is no limit
Dear, we’re falling faster than a New York minute

I want next to you
And all your affections too
For you there is no limit
Dear we’re falling faster than a New York minute

[Verse 1]
She sets her alarm
Five minutes to midnight
And wakes just in time
To greet the new year
Remembers the kisses
Remembers the laughter
And all that’s gone away

[Verse 2]
She shuffles around
Turning the lights on
Goes to the kitchen
Gets the champagne
Opens the window
And wrapped in a blanket
Begins to count and wait
Ten, nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two, one
[Chorus]
Happy new year, happy new year

[Verse 3]
They say you can hear it
Over the island
Starting in Times Square and spreading throughout
A roar like the ocean
It comes from a distance
Grows louder then turns quiet

[Verse 4]
She sits in a dream
Or in a memory
While old conversations play in her ears
Sometimes the minutes feel longer than hours
Some days feel long as years

[Pre-Chorus]
She just glad she gets to be around
To see another spring come to this town

[Chorus]
Happy new year, happy new year
To you

[Verse 5]
She sets her alarm
Five minutes to midnight
And wakes just in time
To say her goodbyes
Thanking the old year for all it has brought her
No mention of the things it took away

[Verse 6]
She shuffles around
Turning the lights out
Closes the window
Checks on the locks
Folds up the blanket
Empties the bottle
And leaves it in the hallway dark

[Pre-Chorus]
She’s just glad she gets to be around
To see another spring come to this town

[Chorus]
Happy new year, happy new year
Happy new year, happy new year
Happy new year, happy new year
To you

Happy new year, happy new year
Happy new year, happy new year

Happy new year, happy new year
To you