Boyle's next project is "Yesterday," a musical comedy about a man who one day is the only person to remember songs by the Beatles and makes a career by plagiarizing their music. It will debut at the Tribeca Film Festival on May 4.” />
The Bond producers tapped "Beasts of No Nation" helmer Cary Joji Fukunaga last September to replace Boyle, who added that there are no hard feelings about his departure or the new direction of the film.
After splitting from the new 007 flick last August, Boyle told Empire in a story published on Thursday that the script he penned with his "Trainspotting” co-writer John Hodge "wasn’t finished, but it could have been really good."
"So we decided to part company, and it would be unfair to say what it was because I don’t know what Cary is going to do. I got a very nice message from him and I gave him my best wishes. "We were working very, very well, but they didn’t want to go down that route with us," he went on. It is just a great shame."
Director Danny Boyle has finally spoken out after leaving the upcoming 25th James Bond movie over creative differences.
After Boyle's departure, Oscar winner Rami Malek and Billy Magnussen have been in talks to play the villain and a CIA operative, respectively, in Bond's new outing. Production on the still unnamed film will start this spring, and longtime producer Barbara Broccoli has ruled out rumors that the title will be "Shatterhand."

Bayer lashed out at Netflix documentary "The Bleeding Edge," with the pharmaceutical giant saying it presents an inaccurate picture of its Essure birth-control implant device.
"The Bleeding Edge" launched on Netflix on Friday (July 27). Bayer said its critique of the film is based on a review of the film's premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival in April.
The film from Oscar-nominated documentary filmmakers Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering ("The Invisible War," "The Hunting Ground") takes a look at the medical-device industry, "examining lax regulations, corporate cover-ups, and profit-driven incentives that put patients at risk daily," according to a Netflix description.
Netflix reps did not respond to a request for comment.
Essure was approved under FDA's Premarket Approval program for medical devices in 2002.” />
According to Bayer, the company provided the producers of "Bleeding Edge" with "extensive scientific information on Essure before the completion of the film." The pharma giant also alleged that several sources interviewed for the film have potential conflicts of interest that are not disclosed. The movie "does a disservice to the thousands of women who rely on Essure for their reproductive health, as it may encourage them to pursue risky and unnecessary surgery to remove the device," Bayer said.
The company cited declining interest in Essure among women, which it attributed to factors including decreased use of permanent contraception overall, as well as negative publicity about the device including the accounts in "The Bleeding Edge." at the end of the year. Last week, Bayer announced that it would discontinue sales and distribution of Essure in the U.S.
Bayer, in a statement issued Friday, said the film "presents an inaccurate and misleading picture of Essure by relying almost entirely on anecdotes, cherry-picking information to fit a predetermined conclusion, ignoring the full body of scientific evidence that supports the [FDA's] determination that Essure's benefits outweigh its risks and disregarding the appropriate warnings that accompany the device."
related to Essure by women who claim the implants caused injuries such as excessive bleeding, abdominal pain and allergic reactions, according to the New York Times. Bayer currently faces more than 16,000 lawsuits in the U.S.

Other cast members include Jessica Walter, Tibor Feldman, Sondra James, and Johnathan Tchaikovsky. Israel worked with non-professional actors from Adaptations to create fictional versions of themselves for the film. The film was produced by Summer Shelton, Todd Remis, and Kurt Enger with Anne Hubbell, Amy Hobby, Philip Ruedi and Laura Staich as executive producers.
A national expansion will follow. Kino Lorber will open "Keep the Change" in New York on March 16, following its screening as the opening night feature of the 2018 ReelAbilities Film Festival. The deal was negotiated between Kino Lorber's  Wendy Lidell and Cinetic’s Jason Ishikawa.” />
Nick Schager gave the film a positive review at Tribeca for Variety: "Winner of the best narrative feature and best new narrative director prizes at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival, it’s an ode to self-discovery and acceptance that’s as funny as it is sweet."
"Keep the Change" is based on an award-winning short film developed by Israel and Polansky that was inspired by Polansky’s experiences at Adaptations, a community for adults on the autism spectrum. Set in New York, the story centers on the struggles by Polansky's character to come to terms with his own high-functioning autism, when he unexpectedly falls for a quirky and outgoing woman whose lust for life both irks and fascinates him.
"Keep the Change," starring newcomers Brandon Polansky and Samantha Elisofon, won the Tribeca Film Festival's awards for Best U.S. narrative feature and best new narrative director last year along with a special mention for the Nora Ephron Prize. At last summer’s Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, the film won the best debut and Fipresci  awards.
"'Keep the Change' has been a labor of love for all involved, from our cast to our crew, our producers, and our community partners at the JCC's Center for Special Needs," Israel said. We are absolutely thrilled to be partnered with Kino Lorber, and to have their exceptional taste and reputation behind the film.” "We made a unique, risk-taking film and it is wonderful to see it come to light on the big screen.
Kino Lorber has acquired all North American rights to the romantic comedy "Keep the Change," written and directed by Rachel Israel, Variety has learned exclusively.