It now has more than 57 million players. Psyonix revealed in 2017 the game has surpassed more than 10.5 million copies sold across all platforms. It was later ported to Xbox One and Nintendo Switch as well. "Rocket League" was created with Epic's Unreal game engine and launched on PC and PlayStation 4 in 2015.
Epic Games is acquiring San Diego-based developer Psyonix, the team behind the hugely successful vehicular soccer title "Rocket League," it announced on Wednesday.
“The potential of what we can learn from each other and accomplish together makes us truly excited for the future.” “We’ve been working closely with Epic since the early days of 'Unreal Tournament,' and we’ve survived changing tides as partners, so combining forces makes sense in many ways,” said Dave Hagewood, founder and studio director of Psyonix.
Afterwards, Psyonix, which currently employs 132 people at its San Diego headquarters, will continue to work on "Rocket League" across its multiple platforms. While neither company is disclosing details about the acquisition, they said they expect to wrap it up at the end of May or early June.
In what was likely a response to Epic, Steam owner Valve announced shortly after it will now take a smaller percentage of a game’s sales revenue once it hits certain milestones.” /> Epic only takes a 12% cut, while Steam takes about 30%. Epic Games launched its own digital store in December 2018 and quickly established itself as a major competitor to rival Steam by scoring a number of high-profile timed PC exclusives, including "Metro Exodus" and "Tom Clancy's The Division 2." It also set itself apart from the competition by offering greater revenue share to developers.
“We have great respect for how Psyonix has built an excellent team and an incredible community around 'Rocket League,'" he said. Psyonix has also partnered with Epic in the past on franchises like "Gears of War" and "Unreal Tournament." Epic Games CEO and founder Tim Sweeney said Psyonix has always been a part of the Epic family, and they're happy to make it official.
After the transition, Epic said it will continue to support the Steam version for all existing purchasers. In the meantime, people can still buy it on Steam. Epic clarified to Variety that means continued patches, DLC and all other content that hits the PC version of the game through the Epic Game Store will also appear on Steam for those who already own the game. The PC version of "Rocket League" will make its way onto the Epic Games Store in late 2019.

The surging success of "Fortnite" and its monumentally popular battle royale mode helped transform the already successful game developer and game engine creator Epic Games into a company worth $5 billion to $8 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.
"I would describe it as seeing the writing on the wall," Sweeney said. "There was an increasing realization that the old model wasn't working anymore and that the new model was looking increasingly like the way to go." The realization that "Fortnite" would do much better as a free-to-play, evolving game led Sweeney to realize he had to change the direction of the company.
The company is expected to make $2 billion off the game this year, according to analysts.” /> The decision to keep "Fortnite" in pre-release development for nearly five years before releasing it and the willingness to test out a new mode with battle royale both sprung from Epic's 2012 decision to become a more agile company.
That injection of cash allowed Epic to make some major changes, including dropping the monthly charge for its game engine and giving it away to anyone who wanted to use it. To balance that out, Epic took a royalty cut from anything created with its engine. The result immediately led to the company's biggest profits for the engine in its history.
And of the three gambles, it was "Fortnite" that hit biggest.
It also notes that Tencent owns 40% of the company, but that founder and president Tim Sweeney is the controlling shareholder. While Bloomberg doesn't identify how it came up with that number, it does cite analysts who seem to back it up.
To get the money to change directions so drastically, Epic cut a deal with Tencent, selling it about 48% of the company's outstanding shares, or roughly 40% of Epic, for $330 million.
While "Fortnite's" impact on Epic Games can't be underrated — references to the game have shown up everywhere from the World Cup, to the worlds of music and movies — the true driver of the company's success was a decision it made in 2012 to shift away from big, boxed, marketing-driven titles and pricey games to a more agile company that gives away a bulk of its content.
We were seeing some of the best games in the industry being built and operated as live games over time rather than big retail releases. Do we enter into a new generation of publisher agreement and continue the way we were?" he says. "It boiled down to a decision: What do we do with our company? We recognized that the ideal role for Epic in the industry is to drive that, and so we began the transition of being a fairly narrow console developer focused on Xbox to being a multi-platform game developer and self-publisher, and indie on a larger scale." "We ruled that out fairly soon after 'Gears of War 3' was released. We realized that the business really needed to change its approach quite significantly.
In a case of the chicken or the egg, the decision to shift to what was known internally as Epic 4.0 was driven in part by the years-long development of "Fortnite," which began as a small indie title inside the studio, and lessons learned there, Sweeney said back in 2016.
Going into this new phase, Epic refocused most of its game development efforts on three titles: "Paragon," "Unreal Tournament," and "Fortnite."