"It's how I found about so many cool bands,” she recalled. “We may not have that exact experience now, but I really love what playlisting has done for me as a music consumer, as someone who really needs to discover things." However, Williams admitted it took her some time to warm up to streaming, as she grew up discovering new bands when they toured with her favorite artists, and by making frequent trips to the popular Nashville record store Grimey’s.
The keynote interview with Beats 1 anchor Zane Lowe at the Music Biz conference in Nashville on Sunday had a counterintuitive format: He was interviewed by someone a lot more famous than he is, Paramore frontperson Hayley Williams. Despite her star power, the singer largely played it straight as an interviewer and allowed Lowe to have the spotlight, although both talked about the power artists have in this ultra-connected world.
Williams says that her Paramore bandmates Taylor York and Zac Farro were the ones who opened her eyes to streaming. She drew comparisons to their middle school days, when York would find their new favorite bands and Farro would make the mix CDs — eventually, those CDs turned into playlists. “As we got older, they were using streaming services more, while I was still trying to be super romantic and go to Grimey's and buy my records,” Williams says. "For me, it wasn't until [the group’s 2017 album] ‘After Laughter’ that streaming felt like a really exciting part of the roll-out strategy.”
“That changed everything in a big way: We had to do our job [and figure out how] to be a really valuable part of new music.” He said a friend in the industry gave him valuable perspective after Lowe stated he didn’t feel the same sense of purpose, now that music is so widely accessible. “He said to me, ‘You're completely missing the point: It was never about when you had the record, it was how you played the record,’” Lowe rcalled. Lowe said that when he first joined Beats 1 in 2015, he faced some challenges moving from to a streaming platform from the giant BBC Radio 1.
"Artists really make music because they want empathy,” Lowe said. One of the things that I think is really important is the conversation around the human spirit continues to get loud — and music is at the very core, one of the most powerful ways of amplifying that conversation.”” /> Indeed, he says that can be a foundation of the connection between artist and listener. “We're discovering so much more about ourselves as people in terms of our vulnerabilities and our insecurities and our emotions.
Lowe also spoke of ways that streaming culture has moved power into the hands of artists, a change he says has gained traction within the past four years, citing Billie Eilish and Chance the Rapper as two model examples of artists using creative tools to distribute their work. Being able to cut out the middleman in that way, I feel more connected to the listener now than I did from 2007-2015," she said. "To me as an artist, it's strange that this was never normal for us, because we were always so headstrong and adamant about how an album cycle would look. Williams explained how streaming feels natural to her as an artist and member of a band born in the digital age.
“It's an extension of the themes and the mood of the record: You're going to serve the purpose of that project so that the audience understands in a deeper way what it means to you.” Lowe also spoke of the importance a message can have in drawing fans to a work, citing Jay Z’s “4:44” album as being centered around a theme (atoning for the transgressions his wife Beyonce addressed in her “Lemonade” album) rather than aiming for a radio hit. "It's about understanding your audience and knowing what you think that is going to get their attention,” he said.

Previously, Trump has described Mexican migrants in racist rhetoric, calling them "rapists" and saying that Mexico is "sending people that have lots of problems, and they're bringing those problems with us." Tensions around immigration have risen to an all-time high, with the longest government shutdown in U.S. The closure has left 800,000 federal workers with either no pay or furloughed wages. history continuing as Trump demands funding for the border wall.
The song mentions past immigrants to America, such as those who came by ship and worked in the "drift mines of Pennsylvania." It also compares that to current immigrations seeking a better life in the U.S.., with the lyrics: "Down at the border/ They’re gonna put up a wall/ With concrete and rebar steel beams/ High enough to keep all those filthy hands off of our hopes and our dreams/ People who just want the same thing we do."
The Killers have released the new track, "Land Of The Free," with a video by Academy Award-winning director Spike Lee, that condemns President Donald Trump's proposed border wall with Mexico and his anti-immigration stance.
Somebody's going to write this song. And then it just piled up and I finally just, you know, Las Vegas, Orlando, Parkland and it just kept coming. Killers frontman Brandon Flowers spoke with Beats 1's Zane Lowe about the song in an interview aired today. I would start the song and then I would put it away and say, 'I'm not the guy to do this,' or I would feel inadequate, waiting for … It was just like 'I have to get this out.'"” /> It started in my mind around when Sandy Hook happened and as a father, how that affected me, and then it just started stacking up: Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, what's happening at the wall, this stuff just didn't seem to be in harmony with the values that I believe my country was founded on. "I think it is a very important time right now and 'enough is enough' was basically where it comes from.
The "BlacKkKlansman" director filmed the video over a few weeks toward the end of 2018, traveling to the U.S.-Mexico border to capture footage of migrants families on their journeys toward "the land of the free." The video shows scenes of migrants' clashes with police, as well as US Border Patrol's controversial practice of firing tear gas at migrants, many of whom are seeking asylum from violence in their home countries.